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Sadie

Hi! I love to read, write, draw, and hang out with friends. I recently graduated from UMKC where I studied by Bachelor's Degree in French! I am fluent in French and can also speak basic Arabic. I worked as a tutor for the last two years to help ESL students to learn English, or write college-level academic papers. I also have experience tutoring various math subjects, and I enjoy this just as much as tutoring English related subjects. I enjoy working with students of any age and would love to meet with your student to help them reach their full potential!

Undergraduate Degree:

University of Missouri-Kansas City - Bachelors, Language and Literature - French

Reading, writing, listening to music, learning foreign languages, cooking, and spending time with friends!

10th Grade Writing

11th Grade Writing

12th Grade Writing

1st Grade Math

1st Grade Reading

1st Grade Writing

2nd Grade Math

2nd Grade Reading

2nd Grade Writing

3rd Grade Math

3rd Grade Reading

3rd Grade Science

3rd Grade Writing

4th Grade Math

4th Grade Reading

4th Grade Science

4th Grade Writing

5th Grade Writing

6th Grade Writing

7th Grade Writing

8th Grade Writing

9th Grade Writing

AP French

Arabic

CLEP French

College English

Conversational French

Elementary School Math

Elementary School Reading

Elementary School Science

Elementary School Writing

High School English

High School Writing

Homework Support

Middle School Writing

Other

Summer

What is your teaching philosophy?

My teaching philosophy is that every student has a different learning style. It is important to try to find a way to teach the subject in a way that helps each individual student best learn and have fun doing it!

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I would do a brief introduction, and then ask them about their name, their interests, and what they are finding most difficult about the subject matter. I would attempt to find out what teaching style might be best for the student based on their responses to questions about how they learn and the main problems they are having.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I always like to make sure that the student fully understands a concept before moving on. The best way to be sure they understand the concept on their own is by asking the student to teach a concept back to me by working through an example. When they can effectively teach or explain the problem, then I am sure they have fully grasped the concept.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I would help a student stay motivated by ensuring them that it is OK to make mistakes, and that the important thing is that they try. If they get too frustrated, we can always take a short break or move on and come back to the problem in a few minutes. Positive reinforcement and a relaxed atmosphere are some of the most important things to keep students motivated!

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I would try to explain the concept using different terms or methods. I also find that breaking the problem down into smaller pieces, and focusing on those, can help the student to eventually be able to connect them together and grasp the concept.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

I find that working on the issues that they believe are the most profound for them generally helps. It helps to make sure a student feels comfortable with you so they can open up about their problem areas.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

I find that students generally enjoy learning more if I integrate humor into the lessons. Additionally, I think that positive reinforcement and encouragement can help students feel excited about tackling a difficult problem.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

I think the best technique to assess whether a student understands the material is to ask them to explain it back to me or work through a few problems on their own so I know they get it.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

I build a student's confidence by pointing out what they have already learned that they didn't know before. Going back and reviewing what they have learned provides tangible proof that they are making progress in the subject.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

The best way to evaluate a student's needs is to get to know them. It is important to be observant of the student by paying attention to clues that indicate when they are frustrated, bored, or lost. Adapting your teaching methods to the needs of the student can greatly improve their interest, motivation, and progress in the subject.

How do you adapt your tutoring to the student's needs?

I try to pay attention to the student's body language and any complaints or comments to make sure that I retain their attention and teach them in a way that truly helps them to understand the subject. I refuse to use a cookie-cutter teaching method because I understand that no two students will learn in the exact same way.

What types of materials do you typically use during a tutoring session?

I typically like to work off of the assignments or materials provided in class because it addresses the specific topics covered in class. Additionally, I find that a computer is an amazing tool to help students, and showing students how to find help online can be extremely helpful for them. For younger students, I might bring stickers, small candies (with parents' permission), or toys to use as rewards for progressing in a subject.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

To help students struggling with reading comprehension, I enjoy working through passages or stories together. I will generally encourage the student to read aloud first before asking follow up questions about the passage. If they need more help, I will read a passage out loud. I will encourage the students to try to read as if they are talking or telling a story on their own so that they are more 'into' the passage.