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Varsity Tutors can get you enrolled in a Massachusetts Bar prep course that can assist you as you prepare for your upcoming Bar exam. Requirements to practice law vary from state to state, but Massachusetts has adopted the UBE, or Uniform Bar Exam, which allows you to transfer your test scores to any other jurisdiction that also uses the UBE. This means you'll be studying for the three tests that cumulatively make up the UBE: the Multistate Bar Examination (MBE), the Multistate Essay Examination (MEE), and the Multistate Performance Test (MPT). Massachusetts also employs the MPRE, or Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination. This is a separate test that assesses your understanding of the conduct expected of legal professionals, as well as the disciplinary measures used to enforce legal standards. Altogether these tests will require you to show an exhaustive understanding of the law, an ability to apply your knowledge using high-level critical thinking skills, and well-developed written communication abilities. There's so much ground to cover that it can be difficult to know where to begin when putting together a study plan, but a Massachusetts Bar course can give you the guidance you're looking for.

How can a Massachusetts Bar class help me get ready for the MBE?

The MBE makes up the largest portion of the UBE overall. The test is long, asking you to answer 200 multiple-choice questions over the course of six hours, and your score here accounts for 50% of your total UBE score. MBE questions run the gamut of legal concepts, covering topics like civil law, constitutional law, criminal law and proceedings, evidence, torts, real property, and more. In order to be sure that you can respond to all the questions you'll see on the MBE, you'll need to be well-versed in all aspects of U.S. law. Studying the content of the test should, of course, be your primary focus when getting ready to take the Bar exam, the length of the MBE makes it as much a test of mental endurance as a test of your legal know-how.

In a prep course your instructor can not only give lectures and lead review sessions of legal concepts, clear up student misunderstandings, and pose hypothetical questions that can get you attuned to the type of critical analysis you'll use on the MBE, but can also go over test-taking strategies that can prove valuable when tackling a test of this magnitude. You can work on your time-management skills, for example, as maintaining a steady pace and an awareness of time over the course of six hours can be a challenge, and you don't want to end up rushing through the latter part of the exam. You can also develop strategies to take advantage of the multiple-choice structure of the MBE, such as techniques to winnow down your list of possible answers.

What will I need to study to excel on the MEE?

The MEE will ask you to respond to a set of six essays. You'll have 30 minutes to answer each essay question posed to you, in which time you'll have to read and fully comprehend the hypothetical legal scenario at hand, think through any legal or ethical concerns that the situation raises, develop your own stance, and craft a logically sound and well-written argument that addresses the matter at hand. If you're unsure of your compositional abilities, or if you're a strong writer but you tend to take your time thinking through your arguments before putting pen to paper, you'll need to put in some work to get yourself up to speed before taking the MEE. Since quickly developing an argument can be just as challenging as actually writing out your response, a prep instructor can drill you with essay questions similar to what you'll see on the test so you can get acclimated to thinking on your feet.

You can also work on your outlining abilities. Planning and outlining your essays may seem like a waste of time, especially when working under pressure on an exam, but it can actually help you write a better essay faster than if you were to extemporize. Outlining also allows you to set down the entire chain of logic that your argument will hinge on and note any places where you might be on shaky ground, allowing you to revise your thoughts before you commit to the essay. A prep instructor can share techniques for quick essay writing that are particularly applicable to the subject matter you'll be dealing with on the MEE.

How can I prepare for the MPT?

The MPT diverges somewhat from the other elements of the UBE. The MPT doesn't take the form of a standard test; instead, it will give you three hours to complete two tasks that simulate the sort of work that you'll perform professionally should you become licensed to practice law and go on to work in a law office. You might be asked to draft a letter to a supervising attorney, for example, or to put together a closing argument. Whatever challenge is set before you, you'll be provided with two sets of documents that you may reference freely as you work. You'll have a "File," a set of simulated police reports, client documents, evidence, witness statements, or other, similar material, as well as a "Library," a collection of historical precedents, relevant regulations and statutes, and the like.

Because you'll have all the necessary material to complete your work, you won't have to worry about having memorized all the applicable legal information. However, just as in real law practice, you may find that many of the documents in your "File" contradict each other, or that they offer misleading information, or that they're not entirely relevant to the immediate task. A Massachusetts Bar course can assist you in building the active reading skills you can use to skim through the provided papers and records, so you can locate critical materials and get to work composing your own work. Your instructor can also give you advice on methods that can be used to map out your written responses as you research, to save precious exam time.

How will a Massachusetts Bar course help me learn all of this?

When you enroll in a Massachusetts Bar class you'll be placed in an online classroom where you'll work with a professional instructor who has been exhaustively interviewed and vetted to make sure that they have both the foundation of legal knowledge needed to teach students how to prepare for the Bar exam and the communication skills required to convey complex information in a way that's accessible. There are no canned lectures or prerecorded video files here. You'll be taught live, so you'll get the same sort of dynamic classroom experience that you would in a traditional brick-and-mortar class.

You'll engage with your instructor and your classmates over video chat through an online virtual classroom, so you'll be able to see, hear, and speak with the rest of the class just as if you were there in person. Your instructor can give lectures, take questions, adjust their curriculum to respond to student concerns, and provide in-class activities that can get you ready for the Bar exam. You and your classmates can work together on MPT-style legal tasks and offer constructive criticism of each others' work, for example, or your instructor can lead the class in group discussions that can bring you into conversation with a diverse range of opinions on legal and ethical issues. As your classmates can come from a wide range of backgrounds and career paths, they can offer new viewpoints on the law that can open your eyes to new ways of engaging with legal discourse. This can give you a more well-developed understanding of U.S. law and how it affects the everyday lives of citizens, improving your ability to give nuanced responses on the MEE.

How can I fit a Massachusetts Bar prep course into my busy life?

We're aware that many law students have personal, academic, and professional commitments that can limit their ability to attend a Massachusetts Bar prep course. This is why we've made an effort to make accessing our courses easy. The online-only format means you won't have to worry about wasting time during a commute to and from a physical location. You can access your classroom from any place that's convenient for you, as long as you have an internet connection and a computer or mobile device. This means you can study at home, from your workplace, or at a library or favorite cafe. A wide variety of course times are on offer, so whether you're looking for a late-night session, something early in the morning, or even a course that you can fit into your lunch break, we can find something for you. Additionally, both two-week and four-week course sections are available.

How do I get enrolled in a Massachusetts Bar course near me?

If you give Varsity Tutors a call today our educational consultants can get you signed up for a Massachusetts Bar course painlessly. We can offer you plenty more information about our course offerings, discuss scheduling, and find a course for you. New course sections start monthly, so reach out now and take this step towards pursuing success on the Bar exam.

Contact us today to connect with a top Massachusetts Bar Exam instructor