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Xavier

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I started teaching in my junior year of high school where I was a part of the Virginia's Teachers for Tomorrow program. With this program, I taught Spanish and French to Middle School students. I was also sort of a teacher's aid when it came to helping students in my mixed AP German class assisting the other students who were taking German I. World languages are my fort and I enjoy helping others to understand them better.

Since my teaching revolves around language learning, my teaching philosophy focuses on how to achieve fluency. There are several skills that involve language learning which include speaking, writing, reading, grammar, vocabulary, and listening. Everyone is quick to say that speaking is the most important and the only skill you will need to have. However, I have been in many German, Spanish, and French classes and I always see a pattern. The pattern is that students are able to say any sentence in a language, but have difficulty responding to what a native speaker says. This is why I believe that listening is the most important skill in acquiring fluency. A conversation dies if you are not able to understand what was said to you.

Xavier’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Virginia Wesleyan College - Current Undergrad, International Cultural Studies, Middle Eastern Studies

Hobbies

Traveling the world, going to the gym, learning world languages, socializing with friends.

Tutoring Subjects

AP French Language and Culture

AP German Language and Culture

Conversational French

Conversational German

Conversational Italian

Conversational Spanish

French

French 1

French 2

French 3

German

German 1

German 2

German 3

German 4

Italian

Languages

Spanish

Spanish 1

Spanish 2

Spanish 3


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

Since I teach world languages, my teaching philosophy is revolved around learning another language. I'm keeping this short, but my philosophy is that you need to listen in order to speak properly. Anyone can say a random sentence in Spanish. But it's being able to respond to what someone says to you that determines whether or not the conversation lives or dies.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I want to get to know you, of course. How am you going to have fun learning if we act like strangers?