A photo of James, a tutor from Northwestern University

James

Certified Tutor

Call us today to connect with a top tutor
(888) 888-0446

I am interested in helping students prepare for the LSAT exam. As background, I am a practicing attorney in Atlanta, Georgia. I graduated from Northwestern University, with a degree in English Literature and Political Science, in 2009. I later graduated from Notre Dame Law School, magna cum laude and in the top ten percent of my class, in 2012. With regard to testing, I have previously scored a 1470 on the SAT (720 math, 750 verbal) and a 167 on the LSAT.

I have long been interested and engaged in teaching and mentoring. My experience tutoring goes back all the way to high school, when I tutored several fellow students in a wide variety of subjects. Later, as senior editor of the Notre Dame Law Review, I mentored a team of second-year members, reviewing and giving feedback on both their legal writing and editing. Additionally, I participated in the Notre Dame Law School’s Street Law program, in which I taught a semester-long course on constitutional law and civil rights and liberties to upper-level high school students. I believe my skill set, academic background and experience uniquely qualify me to help students succeed on the LSAT.

James’ Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Northwestern University - Bachelors, English, Political Science

Graduate Degree: Notre Dame Law School - PHD, Law

Test Scores

LSAT: 167

Hobbies

Writing, film, baseball, tennis

Tutoring Subjects

Administrative Law

British Literature

Civil Procedure

College English

College Essays

Criminal Law

MCAT Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

English

Evidence

Graduate Test Prep

High School English

Law

LSAT Analytical Reasoning

LSAT Essay Section

LSAT Logical Reasoning

Political Science

Social Sciences

Tort Law

Writing


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

My teaching philosophy for the LSAT focuses on teaching students to look past the superfluous details of any exam question, which are merely meant to distract from the actual logical or analytical point being tested. My goal is to teach students to look past the surface of the question and break it into its simplest parts, thus "translating" the unwieldy language of the exam into straightforward, easily understandable questions. Teaching this skill is the core of my teaching philosophy, as I believe mastering it is the single best way for a student to significantly improve his or her score.