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Seth

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My name is Seth, and I live in Washington, DC. I grew up in central Pennsylvania, in the heart of Penn State country. I have been teaching and tutoring since my junior year at Syracuse University, and I enjoy it immensely. At Syracuse, I worked with a program called Literacy Corps, tutoring students from all over the city. After graduating, I entered an AmeriCorps program in Pennsylvania, teaching full time for a year. I feel that having tutored for so long and being so recently out of school gives me an advantage in helping students. I intimately remember the struggles of trying to learn material that just wouldn't click in my head. Given that, I like to go about tutoring from that place of understanding. I believe that just because the material doesn't get through to a student, that doesn't mean it's unable to be learned. I'm excited to find new, creative ways to help in the education process.

Seth’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Syracuse University - Bachelors, Political Science and Government

Hobbies

TV, Movies, Reading/Writing, Sports, Traveling

Tutoring Subjects

10th Grade Reading

10th Grade Writing

11th Grade Reading

11th Grade Writing

12th Grade Reading

12th Grade Writing

1st Grade

1st Grade Math

1st Grade Reading

1st Grade Writing

2nd Grade

2nd Grade Math

2nd Grade Reading

2nd Grade Writing

3rd Grade

3rd Grade Math

3rd Grade Reading

3rd Grade Science

3rd Grade Writing

4th Grade

4th Grade Math

4th Grade Reading

4th Grade Science

4th Grade Writing

5th Grade

5th Grade Math

5th Grade Reading

5th Grade Science

5th Grade Writing

6th Grade

6th Grade Math

6th Grade Reading

6th Grade Science

6th Grade Writing

7th Grade

7th Grade Math

7th Grade Reading

7th Grade Science

7th Grade Writing

8th Grade

8th Grade Math

8th Grade Reading

8th Grade Science

8th Grade Writing

9th Grade

9th Grade Math

9th Grade Reading

9th Grade Writing

Adult Literacy

History

AP U.S. Government & Politics

AP United States History

AP US History

British Literature

College English

College Essays

College Level American History

Constitutional Law

Elementary School

Elementary School Math

Elementary School Reading

Elementary School Science

Elementary School Writing

English

Essay Editing

European History

High School

High School Chemistry

High School English

High School Level American History

High School Writing

Middle School

Middle School Math

Middle School Reading

Middle School Science

Middle School Writing

Persuasive Writing

Pre-Algebra

Public Speaking

Reading

Short Novel

Social studies

US Constitutional History

US History

Writing


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

Students learn in many different ways. Just because they don't understand subject material taught in one manner does not mean they won't understand it looking through a different lens. My philosophy is to try different approaches to teaching the material until one of them clicks.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I would like to get to know the student. I think that teaching is often futile if there isn't a relationship built on mutual understanding. I'd like the student to talk to me about how he or she learns best. Once that understanding is there, we can move on to the material.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I can help a student become an independent learner by developing strategies based uniquely on how that student learns. Education is often painted in broad strokes, hoping to find one technique that fits as many students as possible. Tutoring is unique in that we have an opportunity to find a tailored approach based on the student's skills and needs.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I would help a student stay motivated based on his or her own goals. Some students genuinely want to learn, and others simply want to get a good grade. I think that by being honest about what the student wants out of his or her education, we can find the motivation that is already there.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I would go about it in different ways, relating the subject to something less abstract, rephrasing the inquiry, or working at the foundation. Teaching isn't a one-size-fits-all profession, and there are dozens of ways to tackle one concept.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

If a student is struggling with reading comprehension, it's usually due to a lack of familiarity with the subject matter. For example, if I'm reading a published physics study, I won't retain a lot of that information because I'm not that familiar with physics. Talking about the text in a way that is relatable and builds upon existing knowledge means that the student can actually grasp what he or she is reading.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

The key is to find something in the subject that makes sense to the world in which the student lives. Learning grows outward, and as such, students needs to be able to root what they learn to what they already know.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

Quite simply, from the ground up. You focus on what the student knows, not what he or she does not know, and then incrementally build from that.