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Jonathan

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Whether working over practice questions in a test booklet, reading an instructional manual or an obscure book for pleasure in a library corner, we are engaging with the words and ideas of others and measuring them for their value, use and relevance. Thinking is never done in total isolation anyway but rather is always a social exercise and activity. The best teaching and learning then, I think, allows us to consider knowledge, from the most practical to the most abstract, as both social exercise and activity. This means, as exercise, that we get comfortable with the necessary repetitions of learning--reading and writing, listening and speaking with consideration. As social activity, strong teaching and learning allows us to consider knowledge production as constantly unfolding, knowledge production as a place where self-expression and communication within a larger community are not only welcome but of absolute necessity.

Jonathan’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: University of Massachusetts Amherst - Bachelors, English

Graduate Degree: Wayne State University - Current Grad Student, General Literature

Hobbies

Writing, books, etc.

Tutoring Subjects

ACT Reading

American Literature

College English

College Level American Literature

English

English Grammar and Syntax

Essay Editing

Graduate Test Prep

GRE Subject Test in Literature in English

GRE Subject Tests

High School English

High School Level American Literature

High School Writing

LSAT Logical Reasoning

Math

Middle School

Middle School Math

Middle School Reading

Middle School Reading Comprehension

Middle School Science

Middle School Writing

Other

PSAT Critical Reading

Science

Test Prep


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

Learning is always a social exercise. We seek understanding and self-expression within fields of knowledge opened by communication and activity between people and their objects of inquiry. To learn is to engage in this social exercise: getting in the repetitions of reading and writing, stretching ourselves to think from new angles, and then coordinating ourselves to a world of shared activities, experience, opportunities, and realities. To teach, then, is to help train for this social exercise-- to allow one to comfortably take the risks of stretching after new skills and knowledge.