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Nate

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I was born and raised in Denver, Colorado where I was fortunate to attend great schools with great teachers. I now attend Trinity University as an Engineering Sciences major with a focus in Chemical Engineering, a minor in Physics, and a minor in Math.

I have always been introspective when it comes to my learning, so I've paid a lot of attention to what works for me when I'm being taught. I love interactive learning and problem solving as opposed to lectures and I value the importance of putting something in your own terms to understand rather than memorizing a dictionary or textbook definition.

I've worked with kids ages 4-18 for the past four summers as a swim coach at my neighborhood pool and feel comfortable with pretty much any kid. I understand the struggle of keeping good grades in a busy schedule and would love to help.

Nate’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Trinity University - Bachelor of Science, Engineering Sciences

Test Scores

ACT Composite: 34

ACT English: 33

ACT Math: 33

ACT Reading: 35

ACT Science: 35

SAT Composite: 2100

SAT Math: 760

SAT Verbal: 730

Hobbies

Skiing, Hiking, Soccer, Volunteering, Dogs, Video Games


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

I have always been introspective when it comes to my learning, so I've paid a lot of attention to what works for me when I'm being taught. I love interactive learning and problem solving as opposed to lectures, and I value the importance of putting something in your own terms to understand rather than memorizing a dictionary or textbook definition.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I like to establish a level of comfort, because it's uncomfortable for most kids to fail in front of someone they don't know. Failing is an important part of learning, which I like to communicate early on. Then, I like to see where a student is in their studies and establish a knowledge level so I can use examples and language that are familiar.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I don't want my students to always get an answer right. I want them to go wrong and learn to identify when they go wrong and how to fix it. A focus on problem solving rather than solving problems is key to being successful when I'm not there.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I've been through school, and I remember the days of wondering when I would ever need what I'm learning. As a college student thinking about my future career, I can provide concrete examples of when I can apply what I learn to something I want to spend my life doing. I think that's key to staying motivated as a student.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

Whenever I struggle with a problem, it's usually because I'm looking at everything at once. It works for me and has worked for my students to break a problem down into manageable pieces then put the big picture together. I think visualizing problems is a helpful tool as well.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

I like to have students read a passage and then vocalize what it means back to me. It solidifies their knowledge, lets me know what pieces they get and which they miss from a reading, and teaches them to practice reading for understanding.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

Problem solving, every time. The best way to get better is to do it. I like to talk to my students as they work through a problem so I know what they're thinking and can help them approach a problem differently if they need help.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

If a subject doesn't feel relatable, it can be hard to feel excited about it, especially when struggling. I like to get to know my students so I can relate what they learn back to their life.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

Problem solving. If a student can do the problems, it ensures that they can take knowledge and apply it, which is the ultimate goal of learning. There are crutches along the way that I slowly eliminate (open notes, open me), then I hope to see them do it independently.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

I like to start off small. You show a student that they can do small pieces of a problem or a paper well and build that into the entire problem.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

I like to have a straightforward conversation with the student and a parent about the student's goals.

How do you adapt your tutoring to the student's needs?

I've taught kids ages 4-18 how to swim for the past 4 summers, so I've dealt with all sorts of learning styles and personalities. I'm good at identifying how a student responds to certain encouragement or motivation.

What types of materials do you typically use during a tutoring session?

You can't beat pen and paper for problem solving, but I encourage students to use the web for resources. Almost all the work I do myself includes an open search engine nearby.