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Dwight

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I am an experienced electrical engineer with an advanced degree in electrical engineering. In graduate school, I was a teaching assistant for two semesters (basic semiconductor circuits and electro-mechanical laboratory). During 2012-2013, I taught fundamental electrical circuit analysis to engineering students for two semesters at Penn State Harrisburg. I also have experience tutoring mathematics one-on-one to high-school students.

My goal is to improve and help solidify the student's understanding of the subject matter. With a better understanding, it is expected that the student will be motivated to approach problems with increased skill and eventually confidence.

A student's insight is important to solving mathematics and calculus problems. Sometimes this insight is based on physical intuition--but it does not need to be. I spend time to ensure that the student starts on a correct approach.

With years of hands-on-experience in electrical engineering and physical systems, I am able to associate the equations describing a system with its behavior.

If concepts in mathematics or physics escape you, or you're having trouble figuring out how to set up problems to obtain their solution, I would enjoy helping you work through that difficulty.

Dwight’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Dartmouth College - Bachelors, Engineering Sciences

Graduate Degree: University of Pennsylvania - PHD, Electrical Engineering

Test Scores

SAT Math: 730

Hobbies

Music, astronomy, audio

Tutoring Subjects


Q & A

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

In a first session, I will ask the student to tell me what they are having trouble doing. Then I will ask to see the course syllabus, the text, and the assignment that is proving to be difficult for the student. I will ask the student to begin working the problem so I may see where progress slows.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

By developing the student's confidence in their ability to analyze and set up problems, they will learn that they have the ability to proceed more independently.

What is your teaching philosophy?

For solving math and physics problems, I try to build on the approach the student has already internalized--unless clear difficulties in using that approach are foreseen. If the student is starting off in the wrong direction, questioning in a Socratic way will help the student think more clearly about the structure of the problem and a method for its solution.