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I am a student in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at NYU and have my Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from Boston College. For two years after graduating Boston College, I worked as an Operations Lead and Data Analyst for a healthcare management company. I have experience tutoring children of all ages from elementary through high school. I tutor in a broad range of subjects, however I am most passionate about math and sciences. I am very hands-on and use various methods to engage my clients in order to get the best possible results, and cater toward each individual's learning styles.

Jamie’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Boston College - Bachelors, Psychology

Graduate Degree: NYU Doctor of Physical Therapy - Current Grad Student, Physical Therapy

Test Scores

GRE Analytical Writing: 5


Fitness, Soccer, Ice Skating, Reading, Cooking

Tutoring Subjects


Algebra 2

Anatomy & Physiology


Elementary School Math

Elementary School Reading

Elementary School Science

Elementary School Writing





ISEE- Lower Level


Middle School Math

Middle School Reading

Middle School Reading Comprehension

Middle School Science

Middle School Writing





Social Sciences


SSAT- Elementary Level

Test Prep

Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

I aim to cater my teaching style to each client individually. What works for one student may not work for another, so it is important to view each client as unique and find out what works best for him/her. I hope to engage each client and create a meaningful learning environment.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

After introducing myself, I would get to know a little bit about them and their learning style. By gauging their responses and body language, I would begin to determine the best way to approach the session. I would also ask the student what they hope to get out of the session and their short and long-term goals relating to the subject at hand.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

It is important to engage the student and get them excited about the subject. I would try to relate each subject to something the student is interested in so they would be more inclined to study it on their own.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I have found that emphasizing the importance of doing well in school and maintaining a balanced lifestyle can increase motivation. Some students tend to respond well with incremental rewards and positive reinforcement through the sessions, which also entices them to continue performing.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I would break down the concept to the most basic level in order to determine which part or parts of the concept they are having the most trouble with. Then, depending on their learning style, I would modify how to clarify or instruct the skill. Once I think the student has understood the concept, I will have them teach it back to me to make sure they are ready to move on.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

I would break down each story or paragraph sentence by sentence and have the student explain it to me that way. Then, once they started getting the hang of the story, I would make up my own questions regarding the reading to see if they can logically come up with an answer based on what they have read.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

I have found it most successful to be engaging and encouraging right off the bat. By treating each student as a peer, as opposed to a client, it helps build trust in the relationship so the students are more willing to listen and pay attention during the sessions.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

I would try to relate the subject they are struggling into an activity they enjoy participating in. If I can show them how it will help them succeed in something they like to do, then hopefully they will be more receptive to the subject.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

The best technique I have found is to show them, have them do it with me, and then teach it back to me. This way, I know they have actually mastered and understood the topic, not just memorized what I have shown them.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

By constantly reinforcing their improvements, a student's confidence will continue to grow. I also will never make fun of or ridicule a student for not understanding a subject.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

Every student is different, so it is important to ask questions to the student, parent, caregiver, teacher, etc. to find out what the best approach should be. I want to know their short and long-term goals, as well as their learning style to best evaluate how to approach each session.

How do you adapt your tutoring to the student's needs?

For example, if a student is more hands-on, I will incorporate tactile components, such as counting on their fingers, with coins, markers, etc. to have them be able to physically feel how they are solving the problem. If a student is more visual, I would have them draw, or look at pictures of something in order for them to better understand, instead of me just talking out the problem.

What types of materials do you typically use during a tutoring session?

I like to use various counting tools, flashcards, online games, and any other textbooks that may be required.