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Christine

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I recently graduated from Manhattanville College in Purchase, NY with my BA in English Literature and Secondary Education. I plan on attending Marist College in Summer 2017 to obtain my Master's in Educational Psychology. My passion for English had started in my early days in elementary school when I used reading and writing as an escape, and a way to express my feelings when I felt like I wasn't being listened to. However my passion for Education arose when I found I genuinely enjoyed helping my peers with their homework, with lessons, and even with projects. I love to see the look of students and peers when they finally understand something that had been escaping them. I also just really like helping people in anyway that I can.

Although, don't be frightened, I'm actually a pretty relatable person so if something is bothering you, don't be afraid and know you can tell me. I've helped many peers in the past both with their coursework and also with things that were bothering them. Funny enough when the personal problem was solved I saw a strong comeback in the subject that was bothering them.

The way I look at it I'm here to help you succeed, and I will use my content and education knowledge to help you in every area and in every way that I can. I have had nearly 100% success with every student that I've worked with. What about the "nearly" you might ask? We'll there was a case where a student ended up dropping out of the college because he found he didn't like the major he was in.

Thank you for looking at my profile and I hope I hear from you soon!

Christine’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Manhattanville College - Bachelors, English Literature & Secondary Education

State Certified Teacher

Hobbies

Stained glass, reading, writing poetry and short stories, organizing, photography, video games, drawing.

Tutoring Subjects

American Literature

Basic Computer Literacy

College English

College Level American Literature

Elementary School Reading

Elementary School Writing

English

Essay Editing

High School English

High School Level American Literature

High School Writing

Math

Medieval Literature

Middle School Reading

Middle School Reading Comprehension

Middle School Writing

Pre-Algebra

Technology and Computer Science

Writing


Q & A

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

Before anything, I always make it a point to introduce ourselves so we can be familiar with one another. Then, I ask them how they feel about the class that they are taking and whether or not they enjoy the class. Based on the answer given, I can better understand how to go about the future tutoring sessions. After that, I would normally ask what specific help they are looking for, whether it's a problem with something specific or just not grasping the course at all.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

Much like learning how to ride a bike, it needs to start slow and at a baseline. From there we can add more information and, instead of asking guided questions, have them break down the information and process it themselves. Although it does vary from student to student, most students catch on quickly and, from there, start being able to think and process on their own, leading them to be an independent learner.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I'd find out what goals they have and see where their passions are. I frequently have students that are not interested in reading novels or short stories, but, most often than not, they're interested in music and art. I typically take something they do enjoy and mix it in with what they're having trouble with. For example, a short story can be read like a song, or a novel being a masterpiece of words instead of paint.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

More often than not, when a student has a problem with a skill or concept, it's because it's being taught in a way that doesn't fit their needs. I like to break it down to the simplest it can be and work from there. I also like to compare it to other things they do know or are comfortable with, and that gets the most success. Each student is different, but all can understand if they are taught per their individuality.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

Struggling with reading comprehension is something that I find to be on the rise, so I would reassure them letting them know they are not alone. Sometimes it's an auditory issue, so the student isn't much of a visual learner, so hearing it is better for them. Although, it can also be a vocabulary issue where they don't understand some of the vocabulary, so we would enhance our vocabulary skills. More often than not, there is a cause to the struggle, and it's important to find the cause and deal with it accordingly.