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Nina

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I graduated from Barnard College with a bachelor's degree in Neuroscience & Behavior in 2012. After I graduated, I worked with patients as a Clinical Research Coordinator at Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan. During this time, I developed a love for teaching. I saw that every healthcare professional played the role of an educator in some capacity. As a research coordinator, I instructed patients on their course of treatment in clinical trials and relayed information about how medications could affect the body. After working for two years, I realized I would be most fulfilled with a career in medicine; I could combine my love for teaching, learning, and service. I am excited to be attending New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine this fall to become a physician.

My past experiences as a Clinical Research Coordinator as well as a tutor in math and biology have equipped me with the skills needed to effectively teach students. I want to help individuals actively engage with math and science topics by thinking critically, as this strategy can improve performance. I also strive to make learning an enjoyable activity because we tend to remember concepts that we have learned with pleasure. Moreover, I am a down-to-earth and affable individual who aims to provide a comfortable environment for students to ask questions and share any concerns. I would be thrilled to share what I can, as a tutor, to help my students love learning just as much as I do.

Nina’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Barnard College - Bachelors, Neuroscience & Behavior

Graduate Degree: NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine - Current Grad Student, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.)

Hobbies

Painting, drawing, traveling, tennis, badminton, baking, art history

Tutoring Subjects

Algebra

Biology

College Biology

College English

English

High School Biology

High School English

Middle School Math

Pre-Algebra

SAT Subject Test in Mathematics Level 1

Science

Writing


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

I think each person has a different learning style, but I've noticed, as a student myself, that many individuals benefit from hearing themselves explain concepts to aid in learning. Therefore, I love to help students by having them run through a problem and explain in their own words how they solved it. I think this solidifies understanding.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

In a typical first session with a student, I would openly ask the student what he or she hopes to gain for our sessions. I want to ensure I am as helpful as possible. I would then proceed to investigate what areas the student is facing difficulty with and what might be causing these issues.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I can help a student become an independent learner by enforcing the importance of active self-study in our sessions. By doing practice problems and applying material to daily life, the student can master the information in a way that transcends rote memorization. I believe this active learning process will help the student recall information for a longer period of time and develop a more thorough understanding of the material.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I would help a student stay motivated by reminding them of their academic potential and the power of hard work from my own experiences. I would also motivate them by reminding them of the larger goal of their studies. What is it that they hope to pursue in the future? By connecting his or her coursework to personal life, it helps a student stay mentally engaged with the act of studying.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, I would investigate the root cause of this difficulty by examining his or her thought process. I would ask the student where he or she is getting stuck. I want to provide a very comfortable space for the student to ask any questions. I would then explain the material again in a step-by-step fashion (if possible, in the learning style of the student), so he or she can ask any questions to clear confusion.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

I help students who are studying with reading comprehension to first slow down their reading pace if they are reading too fast. I then suggest that they visually imagine what is going on in their mind in each paragraph, as if they are imagining a scene in a movie or a play. After each paragraph, I tell them to recall the main idea that was stated. Finally, I recommend reading frequently on their own for pleasure to ensure they are practicing these techniques. I also ask them to read different genres, as certain texts are more difficult to understand compared to others. Practice really helps!

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

When I start to work with a student, I first explore any issues that the student is facing with the material, as well as the goals that the student would like to reach. Afterwards, I review any background knowledge regarding the topic and ensure the student has a solid understanding of the material before tackling practice questions.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

To help a student get excited about a subject, I would provide a direct application of the material to daily life. I believe that this approach can help students see the purpose of their studies.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

To ensure understanding, I would ask the student to explain, out loud, the material in his or her own words. This approach can immediately notify the student if he or she has understood the information. I would also provide a short list of questions for the student to answer. I would ask the student to show me how he or she would solve these questions.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

I build a student's confidence in a subject by ultimately having the student teach me the skill or concept. By having the student become the teacher, the student can see he or she has mastered the material. To get to this level, I would first review the issues the student has in the subject, review background material, assign reading and problems, and review those problems/concepts with the student.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

I evaluate a student's needs by first asking the student about areas where he or she is struggling. I would then review past exams the student has taken in school to pinpoint weak areas. I would compile these topics into a list and work on each item.