A photo of Betty, a tutor from University of Maryland-Baltimore County

Betty

Certified Tutor

Call us today to connect with a top tutor
(888) 888-0446

My passion for tutoring started when I was in college, studying economics. I struggled a lot with my introductory microeconomics class and worked diligently to not only understand the content but improve my grades. At the end of the semester, I received an A. Being able to accomplish this was amazing, and helped me regain confidence. But the truth is that I never gave up. Hard work matters!
I became a tutor on campus for students athletes and helped them with economics, accounting and finance.
I also understood that explaining concepts to my classmates and peers on campus was the best way for me to deepen my understanding of the subject matter. I never stopped since!
Throughout the years, I have discovered a passion for helping others improve their grades and pass their classes. I focus a lot on helping students regain confidence, because that's key to perseverance.
I have expanded my tutoring areas of expertise to college math, algebra, trigonometry and French. I now assist middle, high school and college students in those areas.

Betty’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: University of Maryland-Baltimore County - Bachelors, Financial Economics

Graduate Degree: University of Maryland-Baltimore County - Masters, Economic Policy

Hobbies

Organizing church's youth groups and fundraisers, cooking.

Tutoring Subjects

Business

College Business

College Economics

Economics

French 1

French 2

High School Business

High School Economics

Macroeconomics

Microeconomics

Middle School Math

Pre-Algebra


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

My teaching philosophy is very simple: to accommodate both visual and auditory learners, I use a combination of teaching aids, role plays if available, along with class materials. The use of graphs and diagrams are very helpful for online students to help them remember concepts. My greatest reward at the end of a semester is not about the number of students who have passed; it's about the number of students who didn't give up-- those who have been struggling since the beginning of the quarter/semester but who were able to make it until the end. They are very meaningful to me, because their little success is my reward as a tutor.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

At the end of the first sessions, I like to take a few minutes to share my own experience and mention how and where I got that passion for teaching. Since a passionate attitude is contagious, I hope to get them involved in their own learning process. A student involved in his/her learning process is already an independent learner, because it all starts with motivation.