5th Grade Science : Reveal patterns in seasonal appearance of stars

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for 5th Grade Science

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

If you were to watch the night sky from dusk to dawn, you would notice starts rising from the eastern horizon. They will sweep across the night sky and set beneath the western horizon at dawn. Something interesting happens over time. If you were to look outside again a few weeks later, those same stars would disappear from your view. A new group of stars would take their place. In the winter months, stargazers in the Northern Hemisphere look into the night sky and see Orion the Hunter. The same spot in the summertime revels the stars of Scorpius. In the spring, the constellation of the Sickle of Leo, the Lion, is present. Finally, in the fall, the Great Square of Pegasus comes into view. Every season this same pattern takes place, and the constellations return to the skywatcher's view.

As our Earth whirls through space around the Sun, its motions cause night and day, the four seasons, and the passage of the years. The Earth completes a single turn on its axis, not in 24 hours, but 23 hours 56 minutes. As a result, the stars appear to rise, cross the sky and set four minutes earlier each night. The Earth does not merely stand in the same spot in space and spins but is always rushing eastward along in its orbit around the Sun.

What patterns in the stars do we notice when observing the night sky?

Possible Answers:

Constellations are single stars that can be seen in the spring and fall.

Stars appear year-round in the same location.

Constellations are groups of stars that are seen in summer and winter.

Stars appear seasonally and are not all visible for the whole year in a single location.

Correct answer:

Stars appear seasonally and are not all visible for the whole year in a single location.

Explanation:

The patterns of stars in the sky stay the same, although they appear to move across the sky nightly. In a single location, the same stars or constellations are not seen nightly but instead seasonally. As the Earth revolves around the Sun, a variety of stars are visible because of the Earth's location in its orbit.

Example Question #2 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

If you were to watch the night sky from dusk to dawn, you would notice starts rising from the eastern horizon. They will sweep across the night sky and set beneath the western horizon at dawn. Something interesting happens over time. If you were to look outside again a few weeks later, those same stars would disappear from your view. A new group of stars would take their place. In the winter months, stargazers in the Northern Hemisphere look into the night sky and see Orion the Hunter. The same spot in the summertime revels the stars of Scorpius. In the spring, the constellation of the Sickle of Leo, the Lion, is present. Finally, in the fall, the Great Square of Pegasus comes into view. Every season this same pattern takes place, and the constellations return to the skywatcher's view.

As our Earth whirls through space around the Sun, its motions cause night and day, the four seasons, and the passage of the years. The Earth completes a single turn on its axis, not in 24 hours, but 23 hours 56 minutes. As a result, the stars appear to rise, cross the sky and set four minutes earlier each night. The Earth does not merely stand in the same spot in space and spins but is always rushing eastward along in its orbit around the Sun.

Based on this information, which constellation(s) will be visible next summer in the Northern Hemisphere?

Possible Answers:

Sickle of Leo, the Lion

Scorpius

Orion the Hunter

Great Square of Pegasus

Correct answer:

Scorpius

Explanation:

The Earth completes its orbit around the Sun or its revolution in about 365 days total. As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the position of the Earth changes, and this creates the different views of the night sky. Day and night are caused by the Earth's rotation or spin on its axis. This rotation is what causes daylight and nighttime. As the Earth changes its position, the stars appear to move in the sky as well. The stars are stationary but seem to move in the sky. Each day the Earth travels further in its orbit, and a different part of the night sky is visible. The stars appear seasonally, so the pattern will remain the same. Scorpius will appear each summer in the Northern Hemisphere following this pattern.

 

Example Question #3 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

Some stars and constellations can be seen in the sky all year, while others appear only at certain times of the year.

Possible Answers:

True

False

Correct answer:

True

Explanation:

The Earth completes its orbit around the Sun or its revolution in about 365 days total. As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the position of the Earth changes, and this creates the different views of the night sky. Day and night are caused by the Earth's rotation or spin on its axis. This rotation is what causes daylight and nighttime. As the Earth changes its position, the stars appear to move in the sky as well. The stars are stationary but seem to move in the sky. Each day the Earth travels further in its orbit, and a different part of the night sky is visible. The stars appear seasonally, so the pattern will remain the same. The same stars will appear each summer in the Northern Hemisphere following this pattern, as will those in the other seasons.

Example Question #4 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

What celestial body moves, causing constellations and stars to change seasonally?

Possible Answers:

The Moon

The stars

The Sun

The Earth

Correct answer:

The Earth

Explanation:

The Earth completes its orbit around the Sun or its revolution in about 365 days total. As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the position of the Earth changes, and this creates the different views of the night sky. Day and night are caused by the Earth's rotation or spin on its axis. This rotation is what causes daylight and nighttime. As the Earth changes its position, the stars appear to move in the sky as well. The stars are stationary but seem to move in the sky. The Earth is the celestial body that moves to cause some stars to appear seasonally.

 

Example Question #5 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

If you were to watch the night sky from dusk to dawn, you would notice starts rising from the eastern horizon. They will sweep across the night sky and set beneath the western horizon at dawn. Something interesting happens over time. If you were to look outside again a few weeks later, those same stars would disappear from your view. A new group of stars would take their place. In the winter months, stargazers in the Northern Hemisphere look into the night sky and see Orion the Hunter. The same spot in the summertime revels the stars of Scorpius. In the spring, the constellation of the Sickle of Leo, the Lion, is present. Finally, in the fall, the Great Square of Pegasus comes into view. Every season this same pattern takes place, and the constellations return to the skywatcher's view.

As our Earth whirls through space around the sun, its motions cause night and day, the four seasons, and the passage of the years. The Earth completes a single turn on its axis, not in 24 hours, but 23 hours 56 minutes. As a result, the stars appear to rise, cross the sky and set four minutes earlier each night. The Earth does not merely stand in the same spot in space and spins but is always rushing eastward along in its orbit around the sun.

Will the residents of the Southern Hemisphere see the same constellations as those in the Northern Hemisphere?

Possible Answers:

Yes, they will see the same constellations but during a different season.

Yes, they see the same constellations at the same time.

No, they will see only half of each constellation that the Northern Hemisphere sees.

No, they will never see the same constellations.

Correct answer:

Yes, they will see the same constellations but during a different season.

Explanation:

NASA explains why those in the different hemispheres will both see the constellations but during different seasons, "We see different views of the Universe from where we live as Earth makes its yearly trip around the solar system. That is why we have a different Star Finder for each month, as different constellations come into view. Also, as Earth rotates on its axis toward the east throughout the hours of the night, the whole sky seems to shift toward the west."

Source: https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/starfinder/en/

Example Question #6 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

Dev looked at the night sky through his telescope on the first night of each season (spring, summer, fall, and winter). Each night he started looking at the stars at the same time and the same location. He observed the stars for five hours each night. If the sky was clear of clouds on all four nights, which of the following did he most likely observe?

Possible Answers:

There were no groupings or patterns of stars on the first day of the season.

The same stars would be in the same place on each of the four nights.

Different groups of stars remained in the same place for each of the four nights.

The patterns of stars changed and appeared to move across the sky.

Correct answer:

The patterns of stars changed and appeared to move across the sky.

Explanation:

The Earth completes its orbit around the Sun or its revolution in about 365 days total. As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the position of the Earth changes and this creates the different views of the night sky. Day and night are caused by the Earth's rotation or spin on its axis. This rotation is what causes daylight and nighttime. As the Earth changes its position, the stars appear to move in the sky as well. The stars are stationary but seem to move in the sky. Each day the Earth travels further in its orbit, and a different part of the night sky is visible. The stars appear seasonally, so the pattern will remain the same but seem to move across the sky.

Example Question #7 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

What statement about patterns of stars in the sky is correct?

Possible Answers:

The stars are rotating, so it makes the Earth appear to move.

The patterns of stars rotate as the Sun moves around Earth.

As the Earth rotates on its axis, the patterns of stars in the night sky appear to move.

As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the patterns of the stars appear to move.

Correct answer:

As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the patterns of the stars appear to move.

Explanation:

The Earth completes its orbit around the Sun or its revolution in about 365 days total. As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the position of the Earth changes and this creates the different views of the night sky. Day and night are caused by the Earth's rotation or spin on its axis. This rotation is what causes daylight and nighttime. As the Earth changes its position, the stars appear to move in the sky as well. The stars are stationary but seem to move in the sky. Each day the Earth travels further in its orbit, and a different part of the night sky is visible. The stars appear seasonally, so the pattern will remain the same but seem to move across the sky.

Example Question #8 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

Jesse was in his front yard observing constellations in the night sky early in the evening. He observed that one constellation, Orion, was very easy to see from his front yard. Later the same evening, he observed that Orion could be seen better from the back yard.

Which statement correctly explains why Orion appears to have moved in the sky?

Possible Answers:

Earth rotates on its axis, causing Orion to appear to move across the sky.

Orion is the only constellation that travels across the night sky.

Orion moves from North to South across the sky.

As the Earth revolves around the Sun, it causes Orion to shift positioning.

Correct answer:

Earth rotates on its axis, causing Orion to appear to move across the sky.

Explanation:

The Earth completes its orbit around the Sun or its revolution in about 365 days total. As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the position of the Earth changes and this creates the different views of the night sky. Day and night are caused by the Earth's rotation or spin on its axis. This rotation is what causes daylight and nighttime. As the Earth changes its position, the stars appear to move in the sky as well. The stars are stationary but seem to move in the sky. Each day the Earth travels further in its orbit, and a different part of the night sky is visible. The stars appear seasonally, so the pattern will remain the same but seem to move across the sky. The Earth's rotation causes Orion to appear to move across Jesse's yard.

 

Example Question #9 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

The chart below lists the major constellations in the Northern Hemisphere during each season.

Screen shot 2020 09 18 at 3.42.39 pm

Why do the constellations change in each column?

Possible Answers:

The stars have to change locations so they can form new constellations.

As the Earth rotates, the constellations move across the sky.

You can see new constellations as the length of the night changes.

People see different parts of the night sky as the Earth revolves around the Sun.

Correct answer:

People see different parts of the night sky as the Earth revolves around the Sun.

Explanation:

The Earth completes its orbit around the Sun or its revolution in about 365 days total. As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the position of the Earth changes, and this creates the different views of the night sky. Day and night are caused by the Earth's rotation or spin on its axis. This rotation is what causes daylight and nighttime. As the Earth changes its position, the stars appear to move in the sky as well. The stars are stationary but seem to move in the sky. Each day the Earth travels further in its orbit, and a different part of the night sky is visible.

Example Question #10 : Reveal Patterns In Seasonal Appearance Of Stars

Natalie has been using her telescope every night to observe the star patterns (constellations). She kept a journal of her observations all year. Which of the following is a correct observation?

Possible Answers:

Constellations change as they appear to travel across the sky.

Different seasons bring different constellations.

Constellations change their brightness during different times of the night.

Every night the stars stay in the same position in the sky.

Correct answer:

Different seasons bring different constellations.

Explanation:

The Earth completes its orbit around the Sun or its revolution in about 365 days total. As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the position of the Earth changes, and this creates the different views of the night sky. Day and night are caused by the Earth's rotation or spin on its axis. This rotation is what causes daylight and nighttime. As the Earth changes its position, the stars appear to move in the sky as well. The stars are stationary but seem to move in the sky. Each day the Earth travels further in its orbit, and a different part of the night sky is visible.

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