Varsity Tutors always has a different ISEE Middle Level Reading Question of the Day ready at your disposal! If you’re just looking to get a quick review into your busy day, our ISEE Middle Level Reading Question of the Day is the perfect option. Answer enough of our ISEE Middle Level Reading Question of the Day problems and you’ll be ready to ace the next test. Check out what today’s ISEE Middle Level Reading Question of the Day is below.

The ISEE contains a portion that focuses on Middle Level Reading. The section is made up of 25 questions separated amongst five texts. The questions task your middle school level child with determining the main ideas, making inferences, and identifying conclusions with these passages. The ISEE Middle Level Reading test review Learning Tools offer you the option to assess your child’s abilities in those areas. Your child is able to work with a variety of options, which all function as standalone study aids and work well together. One such valuable study aid offered by Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools is the Question of the Day. This is a question that is changed on a daily basis using the practice tests that are based on the test itself. Whether you are using the tools to enhance your child’s learning at school or to help them study for the ISEE, your child can get free daily test practice.

When your child is studying Middle Level Reading, they should take some time to figure out what concepts they need to really improve in. If your child is spending time on material they are already solid in, they are wasting the time they could be using on the more important areas. By determining specific areas of weakness, your child would be able to spend less time overall studying, since they are only working on what they need. Of course, your child can use the Learning Tools to regularly look back and refresh on the material they haven’t been practicing as much.

Throughout the ISEE Middle Level Reading test practice, your child will look into contemporary life passages dealing with ideas, details, themes, supporting ideas, text analysis, tone, figurative language, style, relationships between texts like cause and effect, logic, organization, genre, compare and contrast, predictions, and inferences. They look at the same basic concepts in history, science, and humanities. With the Question of the Day, they will be tested on each of these concepts. Your child gets free daily test practice from a phone, tablet, or computer at any time of the day. In fact, they are given a full analysis based on their answer, which details their percentile, compares their right vs wrong, and thoroughly explains the reason for the answer.

Anytime your child isn’t sure of why they got the answer correct or incorrect, it is important to check the explanation at the bottom. It provides a detailed breakdown of the core concept, and how it applies to the problem or text at hand. If your child needs to study the concept further, you can choose other Learning Tools, such as flashcards, Learn by Concept, or the practice tests. These offer your child additional practice at each concept, and they can choose to use one tool or use them all for a comprehensive review.

With Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools, you can reinforce the material that your child has learned in class, as well as keep their memory fresh without spending a dime. Your child can use the Learning Tools to practice for ISEE Middle Level Reading section as long as they need to, combining them to create a valuable study guide.

Question of the Day: ISEE Middle Level Reading

Adapted from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum (1900)

Dorothy lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who was the farmer's wife. Their house was small, for the lumber to build it had to be carried by wagon many miles. There were four walls, a floor and a roof, which made one room; and this room contained a rusty looking cookstove, a cupboard for the dishes, a table, three or four chairs, and the beds. Uncle Henry and Aunt Em had a big bed in one corner, and Dorothy a little bed in another corner. There was no garret at all, and no cellar—except a small hole dug in the ground, called a cyclone cellar, where the family could go in case one of those great whirlwinds arose, mighty enough to crush any building in its path. It was reached by a trap door in the middle of the floor, from which a ladder led down into the small, dark hole.

When Dorothy stood in the doorway and looked around, she could see nothing but the great gray prairie on every side. Not a tree nor a house broke the broad sweep of flat country that reached to the edge of the sky in all directions. The sun had baked the plowed land into a gray mass, with little cracks running through it. Even the grass was not green, for the sun had burned the tops of the long blades until they were the same gray color to be seen everywhere. Once the house had been painted, but the sun blistered the paint and the rains washed it away, and now the house was as dull and gray as everything else.

When Aunt Em came there to live she was a young, pretty wife. The sun and wind had changed her, too. They had taken the sparkle from her eyes and left them a sober gray; they had taken the red from her cheeks and lips, and they were gray also. She was thin and gaunt, and never smiled now. When Dorothy, who was an orphan, first came to her, Aunt Em had been so startled by the child's laughter that she would scream and press her hand upon her heart whenever Dorothy's merry voice reached her ears; and she still looked at the little girl with wonder that she could find anything to laugh at.

Uncle Henry never laughed. He worked hard from morning till night and did not know what joy was. He was gray also, from his long beard to his rough boots, and he looked stern and solemn, and rarely spoke.

It was Toto that made Dorothy laugh, and saved her from growing as gray as her other surroundings. Toto was not gray; he was a little black dog, with long silky hair and small black eyes that twinkled merrily on either side of his funny, wee nose. Toto played all day long, and Dorothy played with him, and loved him dearly.

Today, however, they were not playing. Uncle Henry sat upon the doorstep and looked anxiously at the sky, which was even grayer than usual. Dorothy stood in the door with Toto in her arms, and looked at the sky too. Aunt Em was washing the dishes.

Which of the following would be most probable, given what we are told in the passage?

Dorothy's parents decide to come visit her in Kansas.

Uncle Henry volunteers to give a public speech at a meeting of local farmers.

Aunt Em decides to become a comedian.

Aunt Em and Uncle Henry decide to care for a local homeless child.

Toto has puppies.

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