ACT Science : How to find research summary in biology

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ACT Science

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Example Questions

Example Question #217 : Act Science

Five experiments are done to test the relative infectiousness of different serotypes of the Influenza A virus when exposed to tissue from different organisms and competition from one another.

When the virus is more infectious, it will result in more detectable antigens.

Antigens are detected via Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which elicits a detectable hue of purple whenever antigens are detected. The hue darkens in response to increased detection of antigens according to this qualitative scale:

Very Dark Purple, Dark Purple, Purple, Light Purple, and Very Light Purple

Experiment 1

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were separately centrifuged onto single layers on human cells and viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Dark purple     H5N1: purple

Experiment 2

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were separately centrifuged onto single layers on chicken cells and viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Dark purple     H5N1: Very dark purple

Experiment 3

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were separately centrifuged onto single layers on swine cells and viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Very dark purple     H5N1: Purple

Experiment 4

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were centrifuged together onto single layers of duck cells while viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Very dark purple     H5N1: Very dark Purple

Experiment 5

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were centrifuged together onto equal layers of human, chicken, swine, and duck cells while viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Purple     H5N1: Light Purple

According to the experiments, H5N1 is most infectious in __________.

Possible Answers:

Humans

Avians

Swine

Mixed cultures

Correct answer:

Avians

Explanation:

H5N1, known as "bird flu", is most infectious in avian (duck, chicken), according to the experiements.

Example Question #218 : Act Science

Five experiments are done to test the relative infectiousness of different serotypes of the Influenza A virus when exposed to tissue from different organisms and competition from one another.

When the virus is more infectious, it will result in more detectable antigens.

Antigens are detected via Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which elicits a detectable hue of purple whenever antigens are detected. The hue darkens in response to increased detection of antigens according to this qualitative scale:

Very Dark Purple, Dark Purple, Purple, Light Purple, and Very Light Purple

Experiment 1

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were separately centrifuged onto single layers on human cells and viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Dark purple     H5N1: purple

Experiment 2

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were separately centrifuged onto single layers on chicken cells and viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Dark purple     H5N1: Very dark purple

Experiment 3

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were separately centrifuged onto single layers on swine cells and viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Very dark purple     H5N1: Purple

Experiment 4

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were centrifuged together onto single layers of duck cells while viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Very dark purple     H5N1: Very dark Purple

Experiment 5

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were centrifuged together onto equal layers of human, chicken, swine, and duck cells while viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Purple     H5N1: Light Purple

One of the issues with ELISA as a detection method is that due to its qualitative nature, the "resolution" of results is low. In other words, measurements of "Very dark purple" are indistinguishable.

Assume another method is tested and reveals that infectiousness for H2N2 in duck and swine is much higher than H1N1, what is a possible implication?

Possible Answers:

In the absence of competion from other serotypes, H1N1 is the least infectious serotype.

"Very dark purple" is the least accurate outcome of ELISA.

ELISA is a useless testing format.

In the absence of competion from other serotypes, H2N2 is more infectious than H1N1.

Correct answer:

In the absence of competion from other serotypes, H2N2 is more infectious than H1N1.

Explanation:

If H2N2 is much more infectious than H1N1 in duck and swine, then this possibly (accounting for the deficit in infectiousness in chicken and humans) makes it more infectious than H1N1 in the absence of serotype competition.

Example Question #219 : Act Science

Five experiments are done to test the relative infectiousness of different serotypes of the Influenza A virus when exposed to tissue from different organisms and competition from one another.

When the virus is more infectious, it will result in more detectable antigens.

Antigens are detected via Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which elicits a detectable hue of purple whenever antigens are detected. The hue darkens in response to increased detection of antigens according to this qualitative scale:

Very Dark Purple, Dark Purple, Purple, Light Purple, and Very Light Purple

Experiment 1

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were separately centrifuged onto single layers on human cells and viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Dark purple     H5N1: purple

Experiment 2

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were separately centrifuged onto single layers on chicken cells and viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Dark purple     H5N1: Very dark purple

Experiment 3

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were separately centrifuged onto single layers on swine cells and viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Very dark purple     H5N1: Purple

Experiment 4

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were centrifuged together onto single layers of duck cells while viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Very dark purple     H5N1: Very dark Purple

Experiment 5

Three separate serotypes of Influenza A are used: H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1. Viral samples were centrifuged together onto equal layers of human, chicken, swine, and duck cells while viral activity was identified using ELISA. The results are as follows:

H1N1: Very dark purple    H2N2: Purple     H5N1: Light Purple

According to the experiments, can it be determined which is the least infectious serotype?

Possible Answers:

Yes: H2N2

No: The viral samples of certain serotypes may conceivably have been damaged prior to testing.

No: The resolution of results from the ELISA method is too low to accurately interpret.

Yes: H5N1

Correct answer:

Yes: H5N1

Explanation:

The notion that the viral samples may have been damaged is possible, but too outlandish to seriously consider.

The resolution of results from the ELISA method is high enough to give us a clear picture.

The results of the experiment show that H5N1 was fairly often the least infectious serotype of the group.

Example Question #220 : Act Science

A medical researcher is testing the effectiveness of a particular supplementation regimen in controlling the accumulation of LDL cholesterol. Her experimental animals are three different groups of mice. Strains X and Y are laboratory mice whose tendencies toward accumulation of LDL cholesterol are well known. The last group consists of mice caught in the wild.

Experiment 1

Population A, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XA: 109 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YA: 163 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice A: 104 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 2

Population B, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XB: 155 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YB: 189 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice B: 115 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 3

Population C, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XC: 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YC: 171 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice C: 112 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 4

Population D, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XD: 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YD: 153 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice D: 98 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

It would be accurate to conclude from the four experiments that __________

Possible Answers:

ICS supplementation is only useful given a particulary heredity.

Dietary factors have a larger impact on LDL accumulation than supplementation alone does.

Trans fats have a larger effect on LDL accumulation than saturated fats do.

Wild mice survive for longer than laboratory strains.

Correct answer:

Dietary factors have a larger impact on LDL accumulation than supplementation alone does.

Explanation:

It makes sense to conclude that dietary factors have a larger impact on LDL accumulation than ICS supplementation does, because the difference between LDL accumulation in high fat diet vs moderate fat diet is much higher than the difference between supplementation vs non supplementation whether the diet is high fat or not.

Example Question #81 : How To Find Research Summary In Biology

A medical researcher is testing the effectiveness of a particular supplementation regimen in controlling the accumulation of LDL cholesterol. Her experimental animals are three different groups of mice. Strains X and Y are laboratory mice whose tendencies toward accumulation of LDL cholesterol are well known. The last group consists of mice caught in the wild.

Experiment 1

Population A, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XA: 109 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YA: 163 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice A: 104 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 2

Population B, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XB: 155 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YB: 189 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice B: 115 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 3

Population C, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XC: 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YC: 171 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice C: 112 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 4

Population D, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XD: 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YD: 153 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice D: 98 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 1 is useful in determining __________

Possible Answers:

Whether or not mice can accumulate LDL cholesterol.

Whether or not wild mice are healthier than lab mice.

The effect that high fat diets have on LDL cholesterol accumulation.

The similarity between laboratory-bred mice.

Correct answer:

The effect that high fat diets have on LDL cholesterol accumulation.

Explanation:

The researcher knows beforehand that mice can develop LDL cholesterol, so that answer choice is wrong.

The first experiment gives too little insight into whether or not wild mice are "healthier" for a determination to be made (the only insight given in LDL lvels, which may be insufficient).

The researcher knows before hand the tendencies and similarities (or lack therof) of LDL accumulation in the lab mice.

Whithout knowing how mice accumulate LDL with a moderate fat diet, it is impossible to know the effect a high fat diet has on them.

Example Question #82 : How To Find Research Summary In Biology

A medical researcher is testing the effectiveness of a particular supplementation regimen in controlling the accumulation of LDL cholesterol. Her experimental animals are three different groups of mice. Strains X and Y are laboratory mice whose tendencies toward accumulation of LDL cholesterol are well known. The last group consists of mice caught in the wild.

Experiment 1

Population A, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XA: 109 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YA: 163 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice A: 104 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 2

Population B, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XB: 155 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YB: 189 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice B: 115 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 3

Population C, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XC: 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YC: 171 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice C: 112 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 4

Population D, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XD: 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YD: 153 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice D: 98 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

The experiment shows that __________

Possible Answers:

ICS supplementation is generally effective in reducing LDL accumulation.

ICS supplementation is only effective when combined with a moderate fat diet.

In wild mice, ICS supplementation and moderate fat diets do not aid in reducing LDL accumulation.

Strain Yhad the highest LDL accumulation of all groups.

Correct answer:

ICS supplementation is generally effective in reducing LDL accumulation.

Explanation:

Strain Yhad the highest LDL accumulation of all groups.

In wild mice, ICS supplementation and moderate fat diets definitely aided in reducing LDL accumulation.

ICS supplementation was effective when combined with a high fat diet.

In fact, ICS supplementation was effective in high and moderate fat diets.

Example Question #83 : How To Find Research Summary In Biology

A medical researcher is testing the effectiveness of a particular supplementation regimen in controlling the accumulation of LDL cholesterol. Her experimental animals are three different groups of mice. Strains X and Y are laboratory mice whose tendencies toward accumulation of LDL cholesterol are well known. The last group consists of mice caught in the wild.

Experiment 1

Population A, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XA: 109 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YA: 163 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice A: 104 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 2

Population B, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XB: 155 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YB: 189 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice B: 115 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 3

Population C, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XC: 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YC: 171 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice C: 112 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 4

Population D, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XD: 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YD: 153 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice D: 98 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

These experiments would be applicable to human cholesterol treatment only if __________

Possible Answers:

Humans have similar biology to lab and wild mice.

Humans respond to ICS supplementation to the same degree that mice do.

LDL accumulation in humans is similar to that of mice.

Dietary factors in humans are as pronounced as they are in mice.

Correct answer:

Humans respond to ICS supplementation to the same degree that mice do.

Explanation:

All of the other answers sound nice, but the only one that makes these experiments applicable to humans is if the one factor (ICS) that affected LDL accumulation in mice has the same effect on humans.

Example Question #84 : How To Find Research Summary In Biology

A medical researcher is testing the effectiveness of a particular supplementation regimen in controlling the accumulation of LDL cholesterol. Her experimental animals are three different groups of mice. Strains X and Y are laboratory mice whose tendencies toward accumulation of LDL cholesterol are well known. The last group consists of mice caught in the wild.

Experiment 1

Population A, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XA: 109 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YA: 163 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice A: 104 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 2

Population B, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XB: 155 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YB: 189 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice B: 115 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 3

Population C, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XC: 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YC: 171 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice C: 112 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 4

Population D, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XD: 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YD: 153 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice D: 98 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Which of the following would not be useful to give additional consideration?

Possible Answers:

What factor causes strain Y to have such high LDL accumulation?

What factor causes wild mice to have such low LDL accumulation?

Why do dietary factors have a much greater effect on LDL than ICS supplementation?

How much saturated and trans fat can be added in order to increase LDL accumulation?

Correct answer:

How much saturated and trans fat can be added in order to increase LDL accumulation?

Explanation:

All of the other options might provide useful insight into the factors that determine LDL accumulation.

However, we are already aware that high fat increases LDL accumulation, and do not need to further pursue that question.

Example Question #85 : How To Find Research Summary In Biology

A medical researcher is testing the effectiveness of a particular supplementation regimen in controlling the accumulation of LDL cholesterol. Her experimental animals are three different groups of mice. Strains X and Y are laboratory mice whose tendencies toward accumulation of LDL cholesterol are well known. The last group consists of mice caught in the wild.

Experiment 1

Population A, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XA: 109 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YA: 163 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice A: 104 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 2

Population B, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. No supplementation was given. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XB: 155 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YB: 189 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice B: 115 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 3

Population C, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet very high in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XC: 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YC: 171 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice C: 112 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Experiment 4

Population D, consisting of all three groups, was bred for several generations and given a diet moderate in saturated and trans fats. Supplementation of iodine, copper, and selenium (ICS) was administered regularly. Accumulation of LDL cholesterol occurred at the following rates:

Strain XD: 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Strain YD: 153 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Wild mice D: 98 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

Without experiment 4, it cannot be determined that __________

Possible Answers:

ICS supplementation is effective at reducing LDL even in combination with a moderate fat diet.

ICS supplementation is effective at reducing LDL even in combination with a high fat diet.

Nothing: Experiment 4 yeilded no new information.

ICS supplementation is only effective at reducing LDL even in combination with a moderate fat diet.

Correct answer:

ICS supplementation is effective at reducing LDL even in combination with a moderate fat diet.

Explanation:

ICS supplementation is effective against LDL accumulation in high fat diets (we know this from experiment 3 NOT 4).

Experiment 4 shows that it is effective in moderate fat diets as well.

Example Question #86 : How To Find Research Summary In Biology

     An agronomist is investigating the effect that different types of soil have on the growth and yield of maize. Sweet corn (Zea mays) is planted in loamy soil of varying proportions of sand, silt, and clay. Growth is measured in inches after 15 days, again after 50 days and finally at 100 days. Dry mass of the yield is measured in grams at the same day intervals.

     Four experiments are conducted such that the average amount of sunlight per day is 15 hours at 75° F for the duration of each experiment. All plants where watered at exactly an inch of water per week. All plots where the sweet corn was grown were equally fertilized at about 25 pounds per 1,000 square feet.

     Weed growth and pest attack was mitigated by assiduous attentiveness and insecticide.

Experiment 1

     Sweet corn is planted in loamy soil of sand 33%, silt 33%, and clay 33% after soil was warmed to 50° F.

                                            Table 1

            Height (inches)                           Day                              Yield (g)

            7                                              15                                 0

            84                                             50                                 9

            94                                             100                               45

 

Experiment 2

     Sweet corn is planted in loamy soil of sand 40%, silt 40%, and clay 20% after soil was warmed to 50° F.

                                            Table 2

            Height (inches)                           Day                              Yield (g)

            8                                              15                                 0

            91                                             50                                 8

            101                                           100                               65

 

Experiment 3

     Sweet corn is planted in loamy soil of sand 40%, silt 20%, and clay 40% after soil was warmed to 50° F.

                                            Table 3

            Height (inches)                           Day                              Yield (g)

            7                                              15                                 0

            86                                             50                                 8

            96                                             100                               40

 

Experiment 4

     Sweet corn is planted in loamy soil of sand 20%, silt 40%, and clay 40% after soil was warmed to 50° F.

                                            Table 4

            Height (inches)                           Day                              Yield (g)

            9                                              15                                 0

            90                                             50                                 6

            98                                             100                               45

What seems to be the optimun combination of soil for highest sweet corn yield?

Possible Answers:

Sand 40%, silt 20%, and clay 40%.

Sand 40%, silt 40%, and clay 20%.

Sand 33%, silt 33%, and clay 33%.

Sand 20%, silt 40%, and clay 40%.

Correct answer:

Sand 40%, silt 40%, and clay 20%.

Explanation:

Loamy soil of constitution sand 40%, silt 40%, and clay 20% yields 65 grams of dry mass, more than all the others.

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