NCLEX : Pediatric Condition Follow-Up

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for NCLEX

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Pediatric Condition Follow Up

The pediatric nurse is counseling a mother/baby couplet who are having trouble breastfeeding. The baby is showing poor suck and falling asleep at the breast. Which of the following is not an appropriate intervention?

Possible Answers:

Unswaddle and undress the baby prior to placing at breast

Gently caress or rub the head of the infant

Feed the baby every three hours until they become in-sync with the pattern

Play with the feet of the newborn while feeding

Feed the infant according to infant's cues

Correct answer:

Feed the baby every three hours until they become in-sync with the pattern

Explanation:

When presented with an infant showing poor suck, it is important to feed when cues are given. The infant will suck best when hungry. However, a breast-fed infant should not go more than 3 hours between routine feedings in order to establish healthy weight gain. Feeding every 3 hours regardless of cue is less advisable. Unswaddling, undressing, and stimulating the infant can sometimes aid in keeping them awake and sucking well at the breast.

Example Question #2 : Pediatric Condition Follow Up

Individuals who contracted varicella zoster (chicken pox) in childhood may experience which of the following if the virus is reactivated later in life?

Possible Answers:

Scarlet fever

Shingles 

Rheumatic fever

Orchitis

Correct answer:

Shingles 

Explanation:

A common sequela of varicella is shingles, a painful rash caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus along the single dermatome that corresponds with the site of initial infection. Rheumatic fever and scarlet fever are both possible sequelae of streptococcus infection, and orchitis is a potential sequela or co-morbidity of infection with the mumps virus.

Example Question #3 : Pediatric Condition Follow Up

At what point is a child with varicella no longer contagious?

Possible Answers:

7 days after the initial presentation

After the last lesion is no longer visible

By the time the lesions are visible, the child is no longer contagious

After the last lesion has broken open and crusted over

Correct answer:

After the last lesion has broken open and crusted over

Explanation:

Varicella is a highly contagious infectious disease of childhood. It is no longer contagious when the last lesion has broken open and crusted over. Until then the virus can be spread via respiratory droplets, by contact with the saliva of an infected child, or by touching an unbroken blister or the fluid within a blister. 

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