HSPT Verbal : Analogies

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for HSPT Verbal

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Example Questions

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Example Question #1 : Analogies

Childish is to puerile as facetious is to __________.

Possible Answers:

trite

amusing

disrespectful

flippant

humorous

Correct answer:

flippant

Explanation:

The word “puerile” is derived from the Latin for “boy.” The English word means “childish,” so this analogy is one of synonymy. When someone acts in a facetious manner, that person treats a serious manner in a way that is inappropriately flippant or light-hearted. Although facetious talk might be humorous, amusing, or even disrespectful, the best description is “flippant,” which is the correct answer for this analogy. 

Example Question #2 : Analogies

Reliable is to dependable remorseful is to __________.

Possible Answers:

atonement

begging

penance

anger

contrite

Correct answer:

contrite

Explanation:

The first half of this analogy is comprised of two very common words. Merely note that they are basically synonyms, so it will be necessary to find a synonym for “remorseful” among the options provided. To feel remorse is to feel sorry for a wrong that one commits. Among the options provided, only “contrite” expresses this same kind of emotional reaction. “Contrition” is the state of such remorse.  While words like “penance” and “atonement” might seem proper, these do not describe the actual state of sorrow felt for the wrong actions.

Example Question #2 : Analogies

Fill is to permeate as satisfy is to __________.

Possible Answers:

enjoy

gorge

satiate

please

gratify

Correct answer:

satiate

Explanation:

The prefix "per-" comes from the Latin meaning thorough. We see this in words like "perfect" and "pervade." When something permeates something else (e.g. a smell in a room), it completely fills it. Thus, permeate is a kind of "complete filling." To be "satiated" is to be satisfied completely. This is a kind of "complete satisfaction."

Example Question #1 : Analogies: Determining Meaning From Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots

Juxtaposed is to location as instantaneous is to __________.

Possible Answers:

position

response

answer

time

scheduling

Correct answer:

time

Explanation:

The prefix "juxta-" comes from the Latin meaning close. When two things are juxtaposed, they are bordering on each other (like neighboring plots of land). Just as juxtaposition is a close placement with regard to location, so is being "instantaneous" a kind of being close with regard to time.

Example Question #1 : Analogies

Vexed is to calm as after is to __________.

Possible Answers:

anterior

ingenuous

posterior

distracted

crafty

Correct answer:

anterior

Explanation:

When someone is "vexed," he or she is annoyed. This is the opposite of being calm. Therefore, we are looking for a word that is an antonym for "after."  he prefix "ante-" comes from Latin and means before. It is found in words like "antechamber" and "antecede." Something that is "anterior" is before something else. This is the opposite of being "after."

Example Question #1 : Analogies: Determining Meaning From Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots

Malicious is to benevolent as extraneous is to __________.

Possible Answers:

tedious

questionable

idiotic

wasteful

relevant

Correct answer:

relevant

Explanation:

Someone who is malicious is not benevolent. Being benevolent means being "good-willed"—quite the opposite of someone with a malicious will, a bad will! Therefore, we are looking for something that is the opposite of "extraneous." The prefix "extra-" means outside of. Extraneous details are unimportant and irrelevant—as when someone tells you all about the recent weather when you ask him or her to give you an outline of the a class you missed. Therefore, extraneous details are not relevant.

Example Question #2 : Analogies: Determining Meaning From Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots

Defeat is to vanquish as finish is to __________.

Possible Answers:

submit

accept

perfect

fulfill

conquer

Correct answer:

perfect

Explanation:

To "vanquish" someone is to completely defeat him or her. Therefore, we are looking for a word that intensifies the meaning of "finish," giving the sense of being wholly finished. The prefix "per-" is from a Latin root meaning throughout, though it often means "thoroughly" or "completely." When something is perfected, it is completely made—it is totally finished.

Example Question #3 : Analogies

Impress is to dazzle as decorate is to __________.

Possible Answers:

festive

cover

blandish

bedeck

inculcate

Correct answer:

bedeck

Explanation:

The word "bedeck" generally means decorate. However, the prefix "be-" can also function as an intensifier meaning thoroughly. To "bedeck" something is to decorate it thoroughly. To be "bedecked" is to be covered or decorated very completely. Just as something dazzling is very illuminated, so too is something bedecked "very decorated."

Example Question #4 : Analogies

Sweet is to cloying as good is to __________.

Possible Answers:

stellar

acceptable

enjoyable

facetious 

horrible

Correct answer:

stellar

Explanation:

When something is "cloying," it is excessively sweet. Therefore, our analogy is one of intensification. As something cloying is excessively sweet, so too is something "stellar" very goodexceedingly good. It comes from the Latin word for "star," as though the goodness of the thing in question were "as high as the stars."

Example Question #3 : Analogies: Determining Meaning From Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots

Contrary is to uncooperative as senile is to __________.

Possible Answers:

archaic

expiring

deathly

foolish

infirm

Correct answer:

infirm

Explanation:

The prefix "contra-" or "contr-" generally means against. "Contra dancing" is a kind of dancing in two lines that face each other, and "counterpoint" is a kind of music that has two musical lines that run "against" each other, weaving together melodies and harmonies. When someone is "contrary," he or she acts in a way that is always against other people's opinions. He or she generally is a troublesome personality and is thus someone who is uncooperative. Thus, we are looking for a descriptive word for "senile." While we often use this word to describe people who are losing their memories, the word can describe the more general condition of someone who is becoming aged. Someone who is senile is becoming infirm and weak with age. The word "senator" comes from a similar root, meaning old man.

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