AP Calculus AB : Asymptotic and Unbounded Behavior

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP Calculus AB

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Example Questions

Example Question #52 : Calculus Ii — Integrals

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the definite integral, we can use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus which states that if , then .

Therefore, we need to find the indefinite integral of our equation to start.

To find the indefinite integral, we can use the reverse power rule. We raise the exponent of the variable by one and divide by our new exponent.

Remember to include a  to cover any potential constant that might be in our new equation.

Plug that into FTOC:

Notice that the 's cancel out.

Plug in our given values.

Example Question #53 : Calculus Ii — Integrals

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

The fundamental theorem of calculus states that if , then .

First, we need to find the indefinite integral of our given equation. Just like with the derivatives, the indefinite integrals or anti-derivatives of trig functions must be memorized.

Don't forget the to compensate for any potential constant!

Plug this in to our FTOC:

.

Notice that the 's cancel out.

.

Now plug in the given values.

Example Question #54 : Calculus Ii — Integrals

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To solve for the definite integral, use the fundamental theorem of calculus. If , then .

First we need to find the indefinite integral.

To find the indefinite integral of our given equation, we can use the reverse power rule: we raise the exponent by one and then divide by that new exponent.

Don't forget to include a to compensate for any constant!

Plug this into our first FTOC equation:

Notice that the 's cancel out.

Plug in our given values.

Example Question #111 : Functions, Graphs, And Limits

Find the indefinite ingtegral for .

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

First, bring up the radical into the numerator and distribute to the (x+1) term.

Then integrate.

 

Since it's indefinite, don't forget to add the C: 

 

 

Example Question #112 : Functions, Graphs, And Limits

Integrate this function: 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

First, divide up into two different integral expressions:

Then, integrate each: 

Don't forget "C" because it is an indefinite integral:

 

Example Question #111 : Asymptotic And Unbounded Behavior

Integrate the following expression: 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

First, divide up into three different expressions so you can integrate each x term separately:

Then, integrate and simplify:

 

Don't forget "C" because it's an indefinite integral: 

Example Question #112 : Asymptotic And Unbounded Behavior

Find the general solution of  to find the particular solution that satisfies the intitial condition F(1)=0

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To start the problem, it's easier if you bring up the denominator and make it a negative exponent:

Then, integrate:

Simplify and add the "C" for an indefinite integral:


Plug in the initial conditions [F(1)=0] to find C and generate the particular solution:

Thus, your final equation is: 

 

Example Question #113 : Asymptotic And Unbounded Behavior

Integrate: 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

First, split up into 2 integrals:

Then integrate and simplify:

Don't forget to add C because it's an indefinite integral:

Example Question #111 : Asymptotic And Unbounded Behavior

Integrate: 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

First, FOIL the binomial:

Once that's expanded, integrate each piece separately:

Then simplify and add C because it's an indefinite integral:

 

Example Question #31 : Integrals

Possible Answers:

Undefined

Correct answer:

Explanation:

Remember the Rundamental Theorem of Calculus: If , then .

To solve for the indefinite integral, we can use the reverse power rule. We raise the power of the exponents by one and divide by that new exponent. For this problem, that would look like:

Remember, when taking an integral, definite or indefinite, we always add , as there could be a constant involved.

Now we can plug that back into the problem.

Notice that the 's cancel out. Plug in the values given in the problem:

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