SSAT Upper Level Reading : Making Inferences in Literary Fiction Passages

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for SSAT Upper Level Reading

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Example Questions

Example Question #12 : Making Inferences In Literary Fiction Passages

Adapted from Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson (1883)

He was a very silent man by custom. All day he hung round the cove or upon the cliffs with a brass telescope; all evening he sat in a corner of the parlor next the fire and drank rum and water very strong. Mostly he would not speak when spoken to, only look up sudden and fierce and blow through his nose like a fog-horn; and we and the people who came about our house soon learned to let him be. Every day when he came back from his stroll he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the road. At first we thought it was the want of company of his own kind that made him ask this question, but at last we began to see he was desirous to avoid them. When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the parlor; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such was present. For me, at least, there was no secret about the matter, for I was, in a way, a sharer in his alarms. He had taken me aside one day and promised me a silver fourpenny on the first of every month if I would only keep my "weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg" and let him know the moment he appeared. Often enough when the first of the month came round and I applied to him for my wage, he would only blow through his nose at me and stare me down, but before the week was out he was sure to think better of it, bring me my four-penny piece, and repeat his orders to look out for "the seafaring man with one leg.”

How that personage haunted my dreams, I need scarcely tell you. I would see him in a thousand forms, and with a thousand diabolical expressions. Now the leg would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the middle of his body. To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and ditch was the worst of nightmares. And altogether I paid pretty dear for my monthly fourpenny piece, in the shape of these abominable fancies.

Based on the underlined sentence, the reader can infer that __________.

Possible Answers:

men pass by on the road far too quickly to be identified as seafaring men

seafaring men pass by the house every day

the man often forgets to ask about whether any seafaring men passed by that day

seafaring men never go by along the road

the man goes on a stroll every day

Correct answer:

the man goes on a stroll every day

Explanation:

The underlined sentence is “Every day when he came back from his stroll he would ask if any seafaring men had gone by along the road.”  This doesn’t tell us that “seafaring men pass by the house every day,” nor does it tell us that “seafaring men never go by along the road” —if either of these were the case, why would the man ask if any seafaring men had gone by? Those answers can be eliminated. Similarly, if men passed by on the road far too quickly to be identified as seafaring men, there would be no reason to ask if any had gone by, since they wouldn’t have been able to be identified at the time. The sentence doesn’t tell us anything about the man forgetting to ask his daily question, so “the man often forgets to ask about whether any seafaring men passed by that day” cannot be correct either. This leaves us with the correct answer, “the man goes on a stroll every day.” We can assume this because the sentence says, “Every day when he came back from his stroll.” If, every day, the time at which the man asks his question is being described as it relates to his stroll, he must go on a stroll every day, or at least be thought to do so.

Example Question #32 : Making Inferences In Literary Fiction Passages

Adapted from Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy (1895)

He sounded the clacker till his arm ached, and at length his heart grew sympathetic with the birds' thwarted desires. They seemed, like himself, to be living in a world which did not want them. Why should he frighten them away? They took upon more and more the aspect of gentle friends and pensioners—the only friends he could claim as being in the least degree interested in him, for his aunt had often told him that she was not. He ceased his rattling, and they alighted anew.

"Poor little dears!" said Jude, aloud. "You shall have some dinner—you shall. There is enough for us all. Farmer Troutham can afford to let you have some. Eat, then my dear little birdies, and make a good meal!"

They stayed and ate, inky spots on the nut-brown soil, and Jude enjoyed their appetite. A magic thread of fellow-feeling united his own life with theirs. Puny and sorry as those lives were, they much resembled his own.

His clacker he had by this time thrown away from him, as being a mean and sordid instrument, offensive both to the birds and to himself as their friend. All at once he became conscious of a smart blow upon his buttocks, followed by a loud clack, which announced to his surprised senses that the clacker had been the instrument of offense used. The birds and Jude started up simultaneously, and the dazed eyes of the latter beheld the farmer in person, the great Troutham himself, his red face glaring down upon Jude's cowering frame, the clacker swinging in his hand.

"So it's 'Eat my dear birdies,' is it, young man? 'Eat, dear birdies,' indeed! I'll tickle your breeches, and see if you say, 'Eat, dear birdies' again in a hurry! And you've been idling at the schoolmaster's too, instead of coming here, ha'n't ye, hey? That's how you earn your sixpence a day for keeping the rooks off my corn!"

It can reasonably be inferred from the passage that __________.

Possible Answers:

the birds are about as big as sparrows

Jude gains comfort from seeing the bird's satiation

the clacker is lost at the end of the passage

Jude falls asleep

Jude is passionate about animal welfare

Correct answer:

Jude gains comfort from seeing the bird's satiation

Explanation:

We know the birds are bigger than sparrows as they are called "rooks," which are akin to crows. The information in the passage that proves Jude is comforted by the bird’s hunger being fulfilled, or satiated, is “Jude enjoyed their appetite.”

Example Question #32 : Making Inferences In Literary Fiction Passages

Adapted from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen (1811)

For a moment or two she could say no more; but when this emotion had passed away, she added, in a firmer tone, "Elinor, I have been cruelly used; but not by Willoughby."

"Dearest Marianne, who but himself? By whom can he have been instigated?"

"By all the world, rather than by his own heart. I could rather believe every creature of my acquaintance leagued together to ruin me in his opinion, than believe his nature capable of such cruelty. This woman of whom he writes—whoever she be—or any one, in short, but your own dear self, mama, and Edward, may have been so barbarous to bely me. Beyond you three, is there a creature in the world whom I would not rather suspect of evil than Willoughby, whose heart I know so well?"

Elinor would not contend, and only replied, "Whoever may have been so detestably your enemy, let them be cheated of their malignant triumph, my dear sister, by seeing how nobly the consciousness of your own innocence and good intentions supports your spirits. It is a reasonable and laudable pride which resists such malevolence."

"No, no," cried Marianne, "misery such as mine has no pride. I care not who knows that I am wretched. The triumph of seeing me so may be open to all the world. Elinor, Elinor, they who suffer little may be proud and independent as they like—may resist insult, or return mortification—but I cannot. I must feel—I must be wretched—and they are welcome to enjoy the consciousness of it that can."

"But for my mother's sake and mine—"

"I would do more than for my own. But to appear happy when I am so miserable—Oh! who can require it?"

Again they were both silent. 

It can be reasonably inferred from the passage that which of the following occurred between Marianne and Willoughby?

Possible Answers:

They just became happily engaged.

He left her to be with another woman.

Elinor stole him from her.

The two just got married.

Her mother refused to let them get married.

Correct answer:

He left her to be with another woman.

Explanation:

In this passage, Elinor is commiserating with Marianne over Willoughby's betrayal. It is apparent that she didn't play a role in it. Since Marianne admits that she has been "cruelly used", it is unlikely that she is happily engaged. The trust she expresses in her mother makes it unlikely that her mother was the source of their split. Marianne mentions "this woman of whom he writes," so it is plausible that Willoughby left Marianne for her.

Example Question #31 : Making Inferences In Literary Fiction Passages

Adapted from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen (1811)

For a moment or two she could say no more; but when this emotion had passed away, she added, in a firmer tone, "Elinor, I have been cruelly used; but not by Willoughby."

"Dearest Marianne, who but himself? By whom can he have been instigated?"

"By all the world, rather than by his own heart. I could rather believe every creature of my acquaintance leagued together to ruin me in his opinion, than believe his nature capable of such cruelty. This woman of whom he writes—whoever she be—or any one, in short, but your own dear self, mama, and Edward, may have been so barbarous to bely me. Beyond you three, is there a creature in the world whom I would not rather suspect of evil than Willoughby, whose heart I know so well?"

Elinor would not contend, and only replied, "Whoever may have been so detestably your enemy, let them be cheated of their malignant triumph, my dear sister, by seeing how nobly the consciousness of your own innocence and good intentions supports your spirits. It is a reasonable and laudable pride which resists such malevolence."

"No, no," cried Marianne, "misery such as mine has no pride. I care not who knows that I am wretched. The triumph of seeing me so may be open to all the world. Elinor, Elinor, they who suffer little may be proud and independent as they like—may resist insult, or return mortification—but I cannot. I must feel—I must be wretched—and they are welcome to enjoy the consciousness of it that can."

"But for my mother's sake and mine—"

"I would do more than for my own. But to appear happy when I am so miserable—Oh! who can require it?"

Again they were both silent. 

It can be reasonably inferred from the passage that Marianne would agree with which of the following viewpoints?

Possible Answers:

A friend's secrets should never be disclosed without his or her permission.

True emotions cannot and should not be suppressed.

Never trust a man who has betrayed you once.

Self-control is more important than enthusiasm.

Anybody can be unfaithful.

Correct answer:

True emotions cannot and should not be suppressed.

Explanation:

Marianne states that "they who suffer little may be proud and independent as they like—may resist insult, or return mortification—but I cannot. I must feel—I must be wretched..." This implies that she suffers too much to hide her feelings, so one can reasonably infer that she would agree that true emotions cannot and should not be suppressed.

Example Question #511 : Prose Fiction

Adapted from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen (1811)

For a moment or two she could say no more; but when this emotion had passed away, she added, in a firmer tone, "Elinor, I have been cruelly used; but not by Willoughby."

"Dearest Marianne, who but himself? By whom can he have been instigated?"

"By all the world, rather than by his own heart. I could rather believe every creature of my acquaintance leagued together to ruin me in his opinion, than believe his nature capable of such cruelty. This woman of whom he writes—whoever she be—or any one, in short, but your own dear self, mama, and Edward, may have been so barbarous to bely me. Beyond you three, is there a creature in the world whom I would not rather suspect of evil than Willoughby, whose heart I know so well?"

Elinor would not contend, and only replied, "Whoever may have been so detestably your enemy, let them be cheated of their malignant triumph, my dear sister, by seeing how nobly the consciousness of your own innocence and good intentions supports your spirits. It is a reasonable and laudable pride which resists such malevolence."

"No, no," cried Marianne, "misery such as mine has no pride. I care not who knows that I am wretched. The triumph of seeing me so may be open to all the world. Elinor, Elinor, they who suffer little may be proud and independent as they like—may resist insult, or return mortification—but I cannot. I must feel—I must be wretched—and they are welcome to enjoy the consciousness of it that can."

"But for my mother's sake and mine—"

"I would do more than for my own. But to appear happy when I am so miserable—Oh! who can require it?"

Again they were both silent. 

It can be reasonably assumed from the passage that if Elinor were in Marianne's position, she would respond by __________.

Possible Answers:

devising an elaborate plan to achieve revenge on the man who hurt her

trying to appear calm and unaffected to preserve her pride and avoid hurting her loved ones with her pain

crying to Marianne and her mother about her pain and the loss of the love of the man she esteemed so well

begging Willoughby to take her back

running away from the entire situation

Correct answer:

trying to appear calm and unaffected to preserve her pride and avoid hurting her loved ones with her pain

Explanation:

Some insight into Elinor's probable behavior can be gained from her advice to Marianne. She advises her that "a reasonable and laudable pride...resists such malevolence," and urges her to try to keep herself composed "for my mother's sake and mine."

Example Question #33 : Making Inferences In Literary Fiction Passages

Adapted from "The Three Musketeers" in Volume Sixteen of The Romances of Alexandre Dumas (1844; 1893 ed.)

As they rode along, the duke endeavored to draw from d'Artagnan not all that had happened, but what d'Artagnan himself knew. By adding all that he heard from the mouth of the young man to his own remembrances, he was enabled to form a pretty exact idea of a position of the seriousness of which, for the rest, the queen's letter, short but explicit, gave him the clue. But that which astonished him most was that the cardinal, so deeply interested in preventing this young man from setting his foot in England, had not succeeded in arresting him on the road. It was then, upon the manifestation of this astonishment, that d'Artagnan related to him the precaution taken, and how, thanks to the devotion of his three friends, whom he had left scattered and bleeding on the road, he had succeeded in coming off with a single sword thrust, which had pierced the queen's letter and for which he had repaid Monsieur de Wardes with such terrible coin. While he was listening to this recital, delivered with the greatest simplicity, the duke looked from time to time at the young man with astonishment, as if he could not comprehend how so much prudence, courage, and devotedness could be allied with a countenance which indicated not more than twenty years.

The horses went like the wind, and in a few minutes they were at the gates of London. D'Artagnan imagined that on arriving in town the duke would slacken his pace, but it was not so. He kept on his way at the same rate, heedless about upsetting those whom he met on the road. In fact, in crossing the city two or three accidents of this kind happened; but Buckingham did not even turn his head to see what became of those he had knocked down. D'Artagnan followed him amid cries which strongly resembled curses.

On entering the court of his hotel, Buckingham sprang from his horse, and without thinking what became of the animal, threw the bridle on his neck, and sprang toward the vestibule. D'Artagnan did the same, with a little more concern, however, for the noble creatures, whose merits he fully appreciated; but he had the satisfaction of seeing three or four grooms run from the kitchens and the stables, and busy themselves with the steeds.

Was the cardinal successful in preventing d’Artagnan from entering England, and how can we tell?

Possible Answers:

No, because d'Artagnan has a letter from the queen.

Yes, because d'Artagnan tells the duke this in the first paragraph.

No, because d'Artagnan and the duke ride to London in the passage.

No, because the duke helped d'Artagnan hide from the cardinal.

We cannot tell whether the cardinal was successful in keeping d'Artagnan out of England based on the information presented in the passage.

Correct answer:

No, because d'Artagnan and the duke ride to London in the passage.

Explanation:

The duke does not help d'Artagnan hide from the cardinal, and nowhere in the first paragraph or the entire passage does d'Artagnan tell the duke that the cardinal succeeded in keeping him out of England, so those answer choices are incorrect. The passage does demonstrate that the cardinal was not successful in keeping d'Artagnan out of England, so "We cannot tell whether the cardinal was successful in keeping d'Artagnan out of England based on the information presented in the passage" cannot be correct either. This leaves us with two remaining answer choices: "No, because d'Artagnan has a letter from the queen" and "No, because d'Artagnan and the duke ride to London in the passage." At this point we must consider the logic of each statement. While it is true that "d'Artagnan has a letter from the queen," this does not help us realize that he was able to get into England. We can tell that d'Artagnan was successful in entering England because he and the duke ride to London in the passage, and London is a city in England. This is the correct answer.

Example Question #72 : Drawing Inferences From Prose Fiction Passages

Adapted from "The Three Musketeers" in Volume Sixteen of The Romances of Alexandre Dumas (1844; 1893 ed.)

As they rode along, the duke endeavored to draw from d'Artagnan not all that had happened, but what d'Artagnan himself knew. By adding all that he heard from the mouth of the young man to his own remembrances, he was enabled to form a pretty exact idea of a position of the seriousness of which, for the rest, the queen's letter, short but explicit, gave him the clue. But that which astonished him most was that the cardinal, so deeply interested in preventing this young man from setting his foot in England, had not succeeded in arresting him on the road. It was then, upon the manifestation of this astonishment, that d'Artagnan related to him the precaution taken, and how, thanks to the devotion of his three friends, whom he had left scattered and bleeding on the road, he had succeeded in coming off with a single sword thrust, which had pierced the queen's letter and for which he had repaid Monsieur de Wardes with such terrible coin. While he was listening to this recital, delivered with the greatest simplicity, the duke looked from time to time at the young man with astonishment, as if he could not comprehend how so much prudence, courage, and devotedness could be allied with a countenance which indicated not more than twenty years.

The horses went like the wind, and in a few minutes they were at the gates of London. D'Artagnan imagined that on arriving in town the duke would slacken his pace, but it was not so. He kept on his way at the same rate, heedless about upsetting those whom he met on the road. In fact, in crossing the city two or three accidents of this kind happened; but Buckingham did not even turn his head to see what became of those he had knocked down. D'Artagnan followed him amid cries which strongly resembled curses.

On entering the court of his hotel, Buckingham sprang from his horse, and without thinking what became of the animal, threw the bridle on his neck, and sprang toward the vestibule. D'Artagnan did the same, with a little more concern, however, for the noble creatures, whose merits he fully appreciated; but he had the satisfaction of seeing three or four grooms run from the kitchens and the stables, and busy themselves with the steeds.

Which of the following pairs of characters are most likely NOT enemies?

Possible Answers:

D'Artagnan's three friends and Monsieur de Wardes

D'Artagnan and Monsieur de Wardes

The queen and the cardinal

Buckingham and the cardinal

Monsieur de Wardes and the cardinal

Correct answer:

Monsieur de Wardes and the cardinal

Explanation:

This question requires you to consider subtle details conveyed throughout the entire passage. Let's consider each answer choice individually:

"D'Artagnan's three friends and Monsieur de Wardes" -  We can infer these characters are enemies because d'Artagnan's three friends fight with him and are injured, whereas Monsieur de Wardes fights against d'Artagnan in this same skirmish.

"Buckingham and the cardinal" - We can infer that these characters are enemies because while Buckingham knows that the cardinal tried to stop d'Artagnan from entering England, he does nothing to expel d'Artagnan from England, and instead travels to London with him.

"D'Artagnan and Monsieur de Wardes" - We can tell these characters are enemies because d'Artagnan describes his fight with Monsieur de Wardes in the first paragraph.

"The queen and the cardinal" - This one is tricky. We can tell that the queen and the cardinal are likely enemies because d'Artagnan is carrying a letter from the queen, yet the cardinal aimed to stop him from traveling freely.

"Monsieur de Wardes and the cardinal" - This is the correct answer choice, as these characters are likely to be working together from what we are told in the passage. The cardinal wanted to prevent d'Artagnan from entering England, and after d'Artagnan managed to get into England, Monsieur de Wardes attacked him. We can infer that the cardinal and Monsieur de Wardes are thus both working to stop d'Artagnan from carrying the queen's letter to its recipient.

Example Question #1311 : Passage Based Questions

Adapted from Emma by Jane Austen (1815)

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.

She was the youngest of the two daughters of a most affectionate, indulgent father; and had, in consequence of her sister's marriage, been mistress of his house from a very early period. Her mother had died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses; and her place had been supplied by an excellent woman as governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in affection.

Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in Mr. Woodhouse's family, less as a governess than a friend, very fond of both daughters, but particularly of Emma. Between them it was more the intimacy of sisters. Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.

The real evils, indeed, of Emma's situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself; these were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her.

Sorrow came—a gentle sorrow—but not at all in the shape of any disagreeable consciousness. Miss Taylor married. It was Miss Taylor's loss which first brought grief. It was on the wedding-day of this beloved friend that Emma first sat in mournful thought of any continuance. The wedding over, and the bride-people gone, her father and herself were left to dine together, with no prospect of a third to cheer a long evening. Her father composed himself to sleep after dinner, as usual, and she had then only to sit and think of what she had lost.

The event had every promise of happiness for her friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her. 

How was she to bear the change?—It was true that her friend was going only half a mile from them; but Emma was aware that great must be the difference between a Mrs. Weston, only half a mile from them, and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude. She dearly loved her father, but he was no companion for her. He could not meet her in conversation, rational or playful.

Based on the passage, Miss Taylor began living in Mr. Woodhouse's household when Emma was approximately __________ years old.

Possible Answers:

fifteen

five

twelve

two

ten

Correct answer:

five

Explanation:

Details in the passage can help you figure out approximately when Miss Taylor was hired as Emma’s governess. We are told in the first paragraph that Emma “had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her,” so she must be about twenty-one. At the start of the third paragraph, we are told,“Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in Mr. Woodhouse's family, less as a governess than a friend”; this means that Miss Taylor has been working for Mr. Woodhouse for sixteen years. Taking sixteen from twenty-one gives us five, so Miss Taylor must have hired when Emma was approximately five years old.

Example Question #1 : Analyzing Passage Logic, Genre, And Organization In Literature Passages

Adapted from Emma by Jane Austen (1815)

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.

She was the youngest of the two daughters of a most affectionate, indulgent father; and had, in consequence of her sister's marriage, been mistress of his house from a very early period. Her mother had died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses; and her place had been supplied by an excellent woman as governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in affection.

Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in Mr. Woodhouse's family, less as a governess than a friend, very fond of both daughters, but particularly of Emma. Between them it was more the intimacy of sisters. Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.

The real evils, indeed, of Emma's situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself; these were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her.

Sorrow came—a gentle sorrow—but not at all in the shape of any disagreeable consciousness. Miss Taylor married. It was Miss Taylor's loss which first brought grief. It was on the wedding-day of this beloved friend that Emma first sat in mournful thought of any continuance. The wedding over, and the bride-people gone, her father and herself were left to dine together, with no prospect of a third to cheer a long evening. Her father composed himself to sleep after dinner, as usual, and she had then only to sit and think of what she had lost.

The event had every promise of happiness for her friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her. 

How was she to bear the change?—It was true that her friend was going only half a mile from them; but Emma was aware that great must be the difference between a Mrs. Weston, only half a mile from them, and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude. She dearly loved her father, but he was no companion for her. He could not meet her in conversation, rational or playful.

This passage likely appears near the __________ of a __________.

Possible Answers:

middle . . . scientific report

start . . . persuasive essay

beginning . . . novel

end . . . fable

conclusion . . . magazine article

Correct answer:

beginning . . . novel

Explanation:

As we are being introduced to the main character seemingly for the first time in the first paragraph of this passage, we can infer that it would be found near the “beginning” or “start” of a text. This leaves us to choose whether it more likely appears in a “novel” or in a “persuasive essay.” The passage is structured as a narrative (it tells a story) instead of as a persuasive piece that attempts to convince the reader of the author’s opinion on a subject. This means that the correct answer is “beginning . . . novel.”

Example Question #11 : Ideas In Literature Passages

Adapted from A Room With a View by E.M. Forster (1908)

"The Signora had no business to do it," said Miss Bartlett, "no business at all. She promised us south rooms with a view close together, instead of which here are north rooms, looking into a courtyard, and a long way apart. Oh, Lucy!"

"And a Cockney, besides!" said Lucy, who had been further saddened by the Signora's unexpected accent. "It might be London." She looked at the two rows of English people who were sitting at the table; at the row of white bottles of water and red bottles of wine that ran between the English people; at the portraits of the late Queen and the late Poet Laureate that hung behind the English people, heavily framed; at the notice of the English church (Rev. Cuthbert Eager, M. A. Oxon.), that was the only other decoration of the wall. "Charlotte, don't you feel, too, that we might be in London? I can hardly believe that all kinds of other things are just outside. I suppose it is one's being so tired."

"This meat has surely been used for soup," said Miss Bartlett, laying down her fork.

"I want so to see the Arno. The rooms the Signora promised us in her letter would have looked over the Arno. The Signora had no business to do it at all. Oh, it is a shame!"

"Any nook does for me," Miss Bartlett continued, "but it does seem hard that you shouldn't have a view."

Lucy felt that she had been selfish. "Charlotte, you mustn't spoil me; of course, you must look over the Arno, too. I meant that. The first vacant room in the front—" "You must have it," said Miss Bartlett, part of whose traveling expenses were paid by Lucy's mother—a piece of generosity to which she made many a tactful allusion.

"No, no. You must have it."

"I insist on it. Your mother would never forgive me, Lucy."

"She would never forgive me."

The ladies' voices grew animated, and—if the sad truth be owned—a little peevish. They were tired, and under the guise of unselfishness they wrangled. Some of their neighbors interchanged glances, and one of them—one of the ill-bred people whom one does meet abroad—leant forward over the table and actually intruded into their argument. He said:

"I have a view, I have a view."

Miss Bartlett was startled. Generally at a pension people looked them over for a day or two before speaking, and often did not find out that they would "do" till they had gone. She knew that the intruder was ill-bred, even before she glanced at him. He was an old man, of heavy build, with a fair, shaven face and large eyes. There was something childish in those eyes, though it was not the childishness of senility. What exactly it was Miss Bartlett did not stop to consider, for her glance passed on to his clothes. These did not attract her. He was probably trying to become acquainted with them before they got into the swim. So she assumed a dazed expression when he spoke to her, and then said: "A view? Oh, a view! How delightful a view is!”

The “Signora” __________.

Possible Answers:

is the wife of a prominent government official

is difficult to understand because of her heavy Italian accent

cleans the pension's rooms

cooks at the pension

runs the pension

Correct answer:

runs the pension

Explanation:

Throughout the passage, we are told more than once that ""The Signora had no business to do it," "it" meaning give Lucy and Miss Bartlett different rooms than the rooms they were promised. We are also told that the Signora has a Cockney accent, perhaps from London. Based on this information and not extrapolating to any conclusions not supported by the text, we can answer that the Signora "runs the pension"; this we can tell because she is the one the women blame for switching their rooms, and someone who cooks or cleans at the pension would likely not have this power or responsibility. Nowhere is it suggested that the Signora is the wife of a prominent government official, and we are told that she has a Cockney accent, not an Italian one.

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