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You can use the SSAT Upper Level Reading Comprehension Question of the Day to get into the habit of thinking about SSAT Upper Level Reading Comprehension content on a daily basis when studying for the SSAT. Varsity Tutors' SSAT Upper Level Reading Comprehension Questions of the Day are drawn from each topic and question type covered on the Upper Level Reading Comprehension section of the SSAT.

Question of the Day: SSAT Upper Level Reading

Adapted from “Darwin’s Predecessors” by J. Arthur Thomson in Evolution in Modern Thought (1917 ed.)

In seeking to discover Darwin's relation to his predecessors, it is useful to distinguish the various services which he rendered to the theory of organic evolution.

As everyone knows, the general idea of the doctrine of descent is that the plants and animals of the present day are the lineal descendants of ancestors on the whole somewhat simpler, that these again are descended from yet simpler forms, and so on backwards towards the literal "Protozoa" and "Protophyta" about which we unfortunately know nothing. Now no one supposes that Darwin originated this idea, which in rudiment at least is as old as Aristotle. What Darwin did was to make it current intellectual coin. He gave it a form that commended itself to the scientific and public intelligence of the day, and he won widespread conviction by showing with consummate skill that it was an effective formula to work with, a key which no lock refused. In a scholarly, critical, and preeminently fair-minded way, admitting difficulties and removing them, foreseeing objections and forestalling them, he showed that the doctrine of descent supplied a modal interpretation of how our present-day fauna and flora have come to be.

In the second place, Darwin applied the evolution-idea to particular problems, such as the descent of man, and showed what a powerful tool it is, introducing order into masses of uncorrelated facts, interpreting enigmas both of structure and function, both bodily and mental, and, best of all, stimulating and guiding further investigation. But here again it cannot be claimed that Darwin was original. The problem of the descent or ascent of man, and other particular cases of evolution, had attracted not a few naturalists before Darwin's day, though no one [except Herbert Spencer in the psychological domain (1855)] had come near him in precision and thoroughness of inquiry.

In the third place, Darwin contributed largely to a knowledge of the factors in the evolution-process, especially by his analysis of what occurs in the case of domestic animals and cultivated plants, and by his elaboration of the theory of natural selection, which Alfred Russel Wallace independently stated at the same time, and of which there had been a few previous suggestions of a more or less vague description. It was here that Darwin's originality was greatest, for he revealed to naturalists the many different forms—often very subtle—which natural selection takes, and with the insight of a disciplined scientific imagination he realized what a mighty engine of progress it has been and is.

Which of the following describes the descriptions provided by Darwin?

Vague

Historical

Precise

Indeterminate

Paleontological

If your high school learner is planning on enrolling in a private school or academy, they will more than likely need to take the Secondary School Admission Test. The Upper Level SSAT is made up of writing, reading, mathematics, and verbal components; there is also an experimental section to the test, which is not scored and is usually used to test new questions being considered for upcoming revisions. The Upper Level SSAT has four different versions based on the grade students will be entering in high school. Students will have just over three hours to complete the 167-question test. Sometimes, preparing for standardized tests can seem intimidating and tiresome. Because of this, Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools offer a wealth of resources designed to make your child’s SSAT Upper Level Reading study sessions simple and effective. By making use of the Learning Tools, you are able to give your child comprehensive SSAT Upper Level Reading practice they need to prepare for test day.

By accessing the Question of the Day on the Learning Tools website, your high school learner is able to maximize the time they have for SSAT Upper Level Reading practice. Each question, which is chosen randomly, covers an important concept that may be included on the Upper Level SSAT in Reading. These areas include various reading passages on the humanities, literary fiction, poetry, science, and social studies. By utilizing the Question of the Day, your learner is working to promote excellent study habits while reinforcing their knowledge of various concepts they’ll need to know on the SSAT.

When your learner accesses the Question of the Day for Upper Level SSAT Reading, they will be given a randomly chosen passage to read. After reading the passage, your learner will be asked a question regarding their understanding of the reading. This format is designed to mimic questions that will be present on the actual Upper Level Reading SSAT, which is perfect for building your learner’s confidence while helping them become comfortable with the test format. Furthermore, each problem contains a clear explanation that can help your learner understand how the correct answer was reached. By reviewing the SSAT Upper Level reading help provided, your learner can enhance their daily test practice and develop a deeper understanding of the material.

By using the Question of the Day alongside the rest of Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools, your learner can augment their preparation for the SSAT Upper Level Reading section. By accessing all of the Upper Level SSAT Reading help made available through Learn by Concept, your high school learner can find information that can help them overcome concepts that are troublesome. In addition, there are a wealth of SSAT Flashcards and Practice Tests that have been specially designed to help your high school learner prepare for their SSAT Upper Level Reading exam. Through the utilization of Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools, your learner has a great opportunity to get the most out of their SSAT Upper Level Reading practice.

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