ISEE Upper Level Verbal : Synonyms: Nouns for Abstract Concepts

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Upper Level Verbal

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Example Questions

Example Question #81 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

PLIGHT

Possible Answers:

Destitution

Poverty

Difficulty

Disowned

Forsakenness

Correct answer:

Difficulty

Explanation:
When someone is “in a plight,” that person is in a difficult situation. Often, this situation is unfortunate and pitiful. In such usage, one will often speak of “the plight” of some person or group. For instance, consider the sentence, “The plight of the poor is something that we all should wish to eliminate.” Note, however, that it does not necessarily pertain to poverty, though poeverty generally does cause difficulties. Likewise, “plight” can imply that a situation is dangerous. Often, these various meaning are mixed together, for an unfortunate situation can be one that places one in danger.

Example Question #81 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

SHAMBLES

Possible Answers:

Torn

Ripped

Wastelands

Disorder

Depressing

Correct answer:

Disorder

Explanation:

When the word “shambles” is plural, it means “state of chaos” in conversational usage. The strict meaning implies that the state of chaos is one of death and destruction. Here, the former is implied, as none of the other words express the sense of massacre corresponding to the strict sense of the word. When used as a verb, “to shamble” merely means “to walk around awkwardly.”

Example Question #82 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

FINALITY

Possible Answers:

Limited

Closing

Small

Decisiveness

Bounded

Correct answer:

Decisiveness

Explanation:

The word “finality” clearly is related to “final,” meaning end or goal. It means “something conveying the sense of representing the end of a set of options or actions.” For example, one could say, “The teacher’s words had an aura of finality about them; thus, the students presumed that there would be no debating the topic any longer.”

Example Question #83 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ANNUNCIATION

Possible Answers:

Send

Transport

Announcement

Conception

Birth

Correct answer:

Announcement

Explanation:

Although the word “annunciation” is often used for a specific Catholic holiday, it has an root meaning that should be obvious from the form of the word. It is related to the word “announce,” and basically means “announcement.” The word now is most often used to describe the story of the angel Gabriel announcing the birth of Jesus to his mother Mary. It is called “the Annunciation” precisely because it is about this “announcement.”

Example Question #84 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

REPROACH

Possible Answers:

Approximate

Insecticide

Chastisement

Arrive

Report

Correct answer:

Chastisement

Explanation:

The word “reproach,” when used as a noun, most properly means “an act of reprimanding” or “chastisement.” These are actions that communicate disapproval. Thus, when someone is said to be “beyond reproach,” that person acts in such a way that he or she does not merit disapproval. The word can be used as a verb to describe the act of expressing such disapproval, as in, “The professor reproached the students for their clear lack of dedication in preparing for class.”

Example Question #84 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

RESOLUTION

Possible Answers:

Longsighted

Decision

Problem

Cause

Adjacent

Correct answer:

Decision

Explanation:

When someone has “resolve,” that person has a steadfast attitude, generally based upon a definite choice. While the word “resolution” can mean “solution,” as in “the resolution to a problem,” it often is used in the sense of “making a resolution.” In the usage “resolution to a problem,” you can think of the word as meaning “something that resolves a problem.” Among our answers, the closest meaning is “decision.” Here, think of the phenomenon of “making New Year’s resolutions,” that is, making decisions and promises for the New Year.

Example Question #84 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

REVELRY

Possible Answers:

Disclosure

Tempestuous

Awakening

Festivity

Rouge

Correct answer:

Festivity

Explanation:

Revelry is a rambunctious or noisy form of partying. Often, it comes with the implication that the partying is accompanied by heavy drinking of alcohol. Among the answers, the word “festivity” best signifies this sense of partying.

Example Question #85 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

REVELRY

Possible Answers:

Awakening

Disclosure

Festivity

Rouge

Tempestuous

Correct answer:

Festivity

Explanation:

Revelry is a rambunctious or noisy form of partying. Often, it comes with the implication that the partying is accompanied by heavy drinking of alcohol. Among the answers, the word “festivity” best signifies this sense of partying.

Example Question #86 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

VILLAINY

Possible Answers:

Squeamish

Accusation

Indictable

Superb

Wickedness

Correct answer:

Wickedness

Explanation:

Clearly, the word “villainy” is related to “villain.” It is a noun meaning “an action that is immoral,” often implying some kind of illegality. For example, one could say, “The mafia boss committed many acts of villainy, often killing his enemies in a brutal manner without any regret.”

Example Question #90 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

LIBATION

Possible Answers:

Offering

Freedom

Unfettered

Permissive

Indeterminate

Correct answer:

Offering

Explanation:

The word libation comes from the Latin meaning “to pour out,” generally implying that it is being done as a sacrifice to the God. Such a “libation” would be poured as a type of sacrifice. The term has been made to be somewhat informal in regular speech and is often used to refer to a drink in general. To say, “Let us share a libation,” can sound far more refined than a mere, “Let us share a drink.” Among the options provided, the only one that matches either sense is “offering.”

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