ISEE Middle Level Verbal : Synonyms: Roots from Latin

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Middle Level Verbal

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Example Questions

Example Question #343 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ALIENATE

Possible Answers:

Arrive

Invade

Forgive

Condemn

Isolate

Correct answer:

Isolate

Explanation:

The words "alien" and "alienate" come from Latin roots meaning other. Whenever something is "alien," it is foreign to us—it is something "other" in the sense of being different. The verb form "alienate" describes the process of making something appear to be foreign or other. Thus, the only option that is adequate for this question is "isolate." Whenever we "alienate" people, we isolate them from each other.

Example Question #344 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

IMITATION

Possible Answers:

Display

Simulation

Dull

Mockery

Occupation

Correct answer:

Simulation

Explanation:

Whenever we "imitate" something else, we try to copy that thing. The word "imitate" comes from roots meaning image. Think of what we mean when we call a picture an "image." It is a kind of copy of something else. This is the general idea of being an "imitation." Another example that might be familiar to you is "imitation vanilla." Because vanilla can be expensive, some companies make a kind of vanilla by artificial processes. Thus, they make a kind of replica of vanilla or they attempt to simulate vanilla flavoring. The best option provided for this question is "simulation," which expresses this general idea of being a copy or an imitation.

Example Question #345 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

VILIFY

Possible Answers:

Concur

Defame

Frighten

Attack

Infuriate

Correct answer:

Defame

Explanation:

The word "vilify" is made up of two stems with which you should be familiar. The first portion is related to "vile." Whenever something is "vile," it is very unpleasant. Sometimes, we use the word to describe something that is very disgusting. The suffix "-fy" means to do or to make. Thus, to "vilify" someone is to make that person appear to be disgusting or unpleasant. In general, the word is used to describe how we can ruin someone's appearance in public by saying bad things about them. Thus, the word "defame" is excellent, for it means to ruin someone's reputation.

Example Question #346 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

POMPOUS

Possible Answers:

Thorough

Domineering

Engaging

Famous

Illustrious

Correct answer:

Domineering

Explanation:

The word "pomp" is used to describe a kind of grand or large personality or external appearance that something might have. A "pompous" person expresses himself or herself in this kind of grand manner. Often, this kind of attitude is arrogant or "pushy." The word "domineering" is derived from the Latin word for master. A domineering person is someone who is forceful and acts like he or she is the master of other people. This word is related to the English word "dominion," meaning, "Area that is under a given person or country's rule."

Example Question #347 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DIGNIFIED

Possible Answers:

Imposing

Radical

Hilarious

Extreme

Governmental

Correct answer:

Imposing

Explanation:

Whenever something has great dignity—hence, is "dignified"—that thing is worthy of respect. Often, such things strike us as being very important and, hence, also show us how unimportant we are in comparison to that thing (or person). For this reason, the word "dignified" has "imposing" as an acceptable synonym. The word "imposing" comes from the combination of the prefix "im-" (a form of "in-"), which here means "on", with the base "-posing," which here means "to place." (The word "position" can be thought of as meaning "the placement.") Whenever something is "imposing", it can be said to place on us a sense of importance or grandeur.  Hence, this word is an acceptable synonym for "dignified."  A "dignified person" could well be called "an imposing person."

Example Question #301 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

FICTITIOUS

Possible Answers:

Legitimate

Fabricated

Oblivious

Foolish

Storied

Correct answer:

Fabricated

Explanation:

As you likely know, the genre of fiction is about stories that are "made up." Non-fiction is about true facts. This seems interesting that the "not real" category doesn't have a "non-" in front of it! However, root words help to understand this state of affairs. The word "fiction" and "fictitious" come from Latin meaning to do or to make. From this, you can understand why "fictitious" is related to "fabricated." Something that is "fabricated" is also "made up." A "fabrication" is something that has been created. Often, we use it to describe something that is made up and not true, as when we say, "He fabricated a tale to cover over his bad deed."

Example Question #302 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

INSULAR

Possible Answers:

Insightful

Annual

Solitary

Illuminating

Intuitive

Correct answer:

Solitary

Explanation:

The word "insular" comes from the Latin word "insula," meaning island. It is actually the root for the English word "isolated." We use the word "insular" to describe someone who is isolated from others. This can be meant physically, but also culturally. An insular person is someone who is ignorant and uncultured. For this question, however, the only good option is "solitary," meaning alone. An insular person is like someone alone on an island.

To help you remember this word, think of the word "peninsula". The state of Florida in the United States of America is almost an island because it is surrounded by water on three sides. Therefore, it is almost an island. The word "peninsula" literally means almost an island.

Example Question #303 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ANNUAL

Possible Answers:

Monthly

Regular

Scheduled

Weekly

Yearly

Correct answer:

Yearly

Explanation:

The word annual comes from the Latin for "year." When we celebrate an anniversary, we celebrate the fact that another year has passed after something occurred. Hence, the best meaning for "annual" is "yearly." An annual gathering is one that occurs once every year.

Example Question #304 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DURABLE

Possible Answers:

Enigmatic

Dense

Intricate

Persisting

Manufactured

Correct answer:

Persisting

Explanation:

The word "durable" comes from Latin roots meaning hard or lasting. The word "endure" is actually related to this. When something "endures," it lasts on because it is so hardy. It is like a hard stone—as opposed to a non-durable soft material. Sometimes we talk of "durable goods." These are things that last a long time and do not need to be bought often—like appliances and well-made cars. Thus, the best option among those provided is "persisting." Something that "persists" manages to "stand through" various hardships. It remains and, hence, "endures"!

Example Question #305 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

REGIMENTED

Possible Answers:

Disciplined

Legal

Sanctioned

Rational

Indignant

Correct answer:

Disciplined

Explanation:

The word "regiment" comes from the Latin "regula," meaning measure, and "regulare," to measure. When we measure things, we sometimes use "rulers." This word comes from "regula." Thus, a person who is "regimented" is a person who is "measured" or "ruled." This means that he or she is "ruled" by discipline—and hence is not lax and undisciplined. Indeed, being regimented indicates that someone is very thoroughly disciplined in his or her actions and activity. (To help you remember this word, think of the idea of army "regiments"—groups that most certainly are disciplined!)

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