ISEE Middle Level Verbal : Synonyms: Roots from Latin

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Middle Level Verbal

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Example Questions

Example Question #281 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

PUGNACIOUS

Possible Answers:

Cooperative

Combative

Squalid

Reprehensible

Callous

Correct answer:

Combative

Explanation:

The latin root -pugn- means fight, so "pugnacious" means aggressive, combative, quick to anger, hostile. To provide additional help, "callous" means harsh and uncaring; "reprehensible" means behavior that is disgraceful, deserving of harsh criticism; "cooperative" means helpful, willing to work with others; "squalid" means dirty, filthy, poor and wretched

Example Question #282 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ANNOUNCE

Possible Answers:

Reprise

Declare

Possess

Suffer

Concentrate

Correct answer:

Declare

Explanation:

The Latin roots -noun- and -nunc- mean declare, speak about, as in "denounce," which means to speak out against something, to declare something is wrong or malevolent. So, "announce" means to publicly declare. Additionally, "reprise" means repeat a performance of, repeat a character; "concentrate" means focus on; "possess" means have, own; "suffer" means experience pain

Example Question #283 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ENDURING

Possible Answers:

Finishing

Completing

Continuing

Halting

Pausing

Correct answer:

Continuing

Explanation:

The Latin root -dur- means tough, hard, lasting, as in "durable," which means able to withstand pressure, long lasting, tough. So, "enduring" means lasting or continuing. Additionally, "halting" means pausing, stopping; "completing" means finishing

Example Question #284 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

MALODOROUS

Possible Answers:

Gross

Loud

Unattractive

Firm

Smelly

Correct answer:

Smelly

Explanation:

In the word "malodorous" there are two relevant Latin roots. The first mal- means bad, as in "malevolent," which means bad natured, evil, wicked. The second is -odor- which means related to smell or scent. So, "malodorous" means smelly, unpleasantly smelling, disgusting, stinky, fetid

Example Question #285 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

INVINCIBLE

Possible Answers:

Unbeatable

Impassive

Unlikely

Important

Interesting

Correct answer:

Unbeatable

Explanation:

The Latin root -vinc- means conquer, win, as in "victory." So, "invincible" means unable to be conquered, indestructible, unbeatable. Additionally, "impassive" means not showing or feeling emotions

Example Question #291 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ENUMERATE

Possible Answers:

Compel

List

Repel

Allow

Attract

Correct answer:

List

Explanation:

The Latin root -numer- means number, as in "numerous" which means a large number of something. So, to "enumerate" means to make a numbered list of something. Additionally, "repel" means force back, fight off; "compel" means force to do something.

Example Question #292 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DERIDE

Possible Answers:

Detain

Kill

Mock

Impair

Discuss

Correct answer:

Mock

Explanation:

The word "deride" comes from the Latin word for to laugh. Whenever we "ridicule" someone, we mock that person or "laugh at them." In a way, you can think of the expression "being a laughing stock." This means that someone is being ridiculed or derided. When we "deride" someone, we mock that person. Mockery is a mean way of "making fun of" someone. (Do you see that the word "deride" has a form similar to "ridicule"? Both words come from the Latin "ridere," meaning to laugh.) 

Example Question #293 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

LUMINOUS

Possible Answers:

Surprising

Increasing

Fading

Dim

Brilliant

Correct answer:

Brilliant

Explanation:

The word "luminous" is related to the word "illuminate." They both come from Latin roots meaning light. Whenever we "illuminate" a room, we add light to it. Something that is "luminous" is shining or bright. The word "brilliant" is often used to mean very intelligent; however, this comes from the idea that such a person has a "very bright or shining mind." It is a bit metaphorical. The word "brilliant" means to shine, and this is a good synonym for "luminous."

Example Question #341 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DOCILE

Possible Answers:

Forgetful

Quiet

Regular

Intelligent

Submissive

Correct answer:

Submissive

Explanation:

The word "docile" comes from Latin roots meaning to teach. The words "doctor," "indoctrinate," "doctrine," and "document" all come from the same root. A "doctor" is someone who has been taught very thoroughly, and a "doctrine" is a teaching. Whenever a person is described as being "docile," he or she is teachable. Hence, the best option is "submissive." Someone who is "submissive" is someone who lets himself or herself be taught (or, at least, led) by someone else.

Example Question #342 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ILLITERATE

Possible Answers:

Irrational

Learning

Plain

Remote

Ignorant

Correct answer:

Ignorant

Explanation:

The word "illiterate" comes from the Latin word for letters. Whenever we talk about the "literal" meaning of something, we want to know "what the letters mean"—i.e. what it means without any additional interpretation. Whenever someone is "illiterate," he or she cannot read or communicate via written language. Thus, an illiterate person is generally an uneducated person. Thus, the word "ignorant" is sometimes a fine synonym for "illiterate."

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