ISEE Middle Level Verbal : Synonyms: Roots from Latin

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Middle Level Verbal

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Example Questions

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Example Question #306 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

MIRACULOUS

Possible Answers:

Fictitious

Mythical

Religious

Astonishing

Deceptive

Correct answer:

Astonishing

Explanation:

We tend to think of miracles as being associated with religion. While it is true that he word "miraculous" can be used to describe something that is supernatural and, hence, perhaps associated with a religious phenomenon, this is not its primary meaning. The word actually comes from Latin roots meaning to be in wonder or to marvel at. Thus, something that is "miraculous" is something that is very wonderful, surprising, or (as is the option for this question) "astonishing"!

Example Question #101 : Synonyms: Roots

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

MORTIFIED

Possible Answers:

Humiliated

Enraged

Interrogated

Massacred

Slaughtered

Correct answer:

Humiliated

Explanation:

Do not be tricked by all of your hard studying! The word "mortified" does have the Latin root "mort-" in it, which means dead or death; however, the word "mortified" does not directly deal with death or being killed. Instead, it indicates the kind of extreme embarrassment or humiliation someone can feel from time to time. It is that kind of feeling that makes people say something like, "I would rather be dead than be caught in that place," or, "I would rather be dead than to have tripped like that in front of Susan!" Thus, the best option among those provided here is "humiliated," not the options about death and dying like "slaughtered" and "massacred."

Example Question #308 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

CIVIL

Possible Answers:

Legal

Formal

Polite

Intelligent

Constructed

Correct answer:

Polite

Explanation:

The word "civil" comes from Latin root words meaning citizen. A civilian is a person who is a regular citizen of a country—that is, not a soldier. Whenever someone is described as being civil, we mean to say that he or she is living in a way that befits those who are able to live in a city. A person who is barbaric and uncivilized cannot interact with other people and likely is rude. A "civil" person is polite and personable.

Example Question #309 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

LITERATE

Possible Answers:

Ghastly

Strict

Educated

Genius

Precise

Correct answer:

Educated

Explanation:

The word "literate" comes from the Latin word littera, meaning "letter" as in one of the letters in a word. A person who is "literate" is able to read letters. More simply stated, he or she is able to read and write. This word is therefore generally used to describe someone who is educated. It doesn't indicate great genius or deep education, but it does indicate the state of being educated. Hence, the word "educated" is a fine option among those provided here. Do not confuse "literate" with "literal," which would mean either "strict" or "precise." The literal meaning of something is its exact meaning. Actually, "literal" means something like "just by the letters"—in the sense of meaning "without any further interpretation."

Example Question #310 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

AUDITION

Possible Answers:

Presentation

Recital

Concert

Implementation

Trial

Correct answer:

Trial

Explanation:

The word "audition" comes from Latin roots meaning to hear. We find this same root in the word "audio." Whenever someone has an audition, he or she wants to have a "hearing" from some sort of "judge." That is, he or she wants some kind of "judge" to give him or her a chance regarding a position or task. For example, people may audition for various parts in a musical. Thus, the only acceptable option provided here is "trial." A "trial run" is a kind of initial attempt. When we "try out" for a part, we could also say that we are giving the part a "trial run"—though we will only get the part if we are judged to have done well!

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