ISEE Lower Level Verbal : Synonyms

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Lower Level Verbal

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Example Questions

Example Question #71 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

REAR

Possible Answers:

Outdated

Unimportant

Genuine

Forgotten

Nurture

Correct answer:

Nurture

Explanation:

The word "rear" can take on two very different meanings. On the one hand, it can mean behind. Think of the "rear seat" of the car. This is the "back seat." Thus, options like "forgotten," "unimportant," and "outdated" might all appear to be correct, for things that are "behind" us are sometimes forgotten, unimportant, or outdated. None of these directly means "behind." Instead, the second meaning is what we need, namely, to raise, parent, or nurture. We use this meaning when we say things like, "He reared his children to be respectful."

(Actually, the word "rear" can also mean, "To raise up or lift up," as when we say, "He reared his head to look at me." This meaning is given here in this question.)

Example Question #72 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

SOIL

Possible Answers:

Damage

Plant

Dig

Below

Punish

Correct answer:

Damage

Explanation:

The word "soil" can be used to describe dirt. It also can mean to make dirty. For example, think of when we say, "He soiled his shirt." This means that the person got some kind of dirt on his shirt. Now, you can also make someone's reputation "dirty." This is another acceptable meaning for "soil", at least in an extended sense. Thus, you can say, "When Harold told the secret in public, he soiled Egbert's reputation." This means that Harold damaged Egbert's reputation. This is the only option that works as an acceptable synonym.

Example Question #73 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

STRUCTURED

Possible Answers:

Erected

Towering

Delivered

Commercial

Organized

Correct answer:

Organized

Explanation:

Whenever something is said to have "structure" or to be a "structure," we are saying that the thing in question has or is an organized arrangement. We do tend to use the word to describe physical buildings. Thus, a house or a large tower is a "structure." We say this because the building is an arrangement of parts that come together to make one, unified building; however, anything that is organized can be called "structured." Some of the other options may tempt you because they are related to physical buildings; however, only "organized" expresses this idea about having an ordered structure.

Example Question #71 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

EXPLOSIVE

Possible Answers:

Terrorism

Rapid

Secretive

Obvious

Frightening

Correct answer:

Rapid

Explanation:

We tend to use the word "explosive" to think of things that physically explode—often with very dangerous and fiery consequences; however, think of what explosions are like. They are very sudden things. Quickly, some small item blasts outward—it explodes. Sometimes, we speak of "explosive" things metaphorically, like an "explosive population growth in ducks." This means that the ducks have suddenly had a significant increase in population. Although some of the other options are somehow related to the general notion of explosions, only "sudden" is a proper synonym.

Example Question #75 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

LOFTY

Possible Answers:

Uneven

Hilly 

Windy

Emphatic

Noble

Correct answer:

Noble

Explanation:

You perhaps have heard the word "lofty" used to describe something that is physically very tall. This is the most obvious and standard meaning of the word; however, this idea of being "high up" can also apply to less material things. For instance, someone can have very "lofty goals" or very "lofty intentions." This means that he or she has chosen a very noble or praiseworthy set of goals or intentions. Such goals or intentions are "above" other goals and intentions in a metaphorical sense.

Example Question #72 : Isee Lower Level (Grades 5 6) Verbal Reasoning

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

IMPLY

Possible Answers:

Deliver

Hide

Conceal

Forget

Involve

Correct answer:

Involve

Explanation:

The most tempting wrong options for this questions are likely "conceal" and "hide." When something is "implicit", it is not completely clear and out in the open. Implicit meanings are things that are not directly stated, though they are "really there." For example, someone might say something like, "Oh yes, it is wonderful that you are here." That person's tone might imply that he or she is actually angry. To imply something, however, is not to hide it. Now, you can also use the word to mean, "involve." It especially can indicate that one thing will be the consequence of something else. Thus, you could say, "The heavy rains imply that there will likely be heavy floods."

Example Question #77 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

HEALTHY

Possible Answers:

Operable

Medicinal

Normal

Amazing

Elegant

Correct answer:

Normal

Explanation:

The word "healthy" can be used to describe someone's state of physical well-being. It can also just mean "normal" or "enough." For example, you can say that someone has a "healthy appetite." This person has a normal appetite—instead of having one that is sickly and very small. Also, you could say, "He had a healthy suspicion about gambling." This means that the person has a reasonable and normal suspicion about gambling, which is a risk business after all!

Example Question #78 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

MAJORITY

Possible Answers:

Large

Bulky 

Most

Important 

Minority 

Correct answer:

Most

Explanation:

"Majority" means more than 50%, or the group with the most members in a given vote or debate. It is the opposite of "minority," which therefore cannot be the correct answer. The right answer is "most," because "most" means more than half. Thus, majority and most are synonyms. While "majority" can sometimes be used as a noun, it can also be used as an adjective. ("The majority of the population" is an example of it being used as a noun, while "the majority vote" is an example of it being used as an adjective.)

Example Question #79 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

MAJORITY

Possible Answers:

Bulky

Minority

Most

Important

Large

Correct answer:

Most

Explanation:

"Majority" means more than 50%, or the group with the most members in a given vote or debate. It is the opposite of "minority," which therefore cannot be the correct answer. The right answer is "most," because "most" means more than half. Thus, majority and most are synonyms. While "majority" can sometimes be used as a noun, it can also be used as an adjective. ("The majority of the population" is an example of it being used as a noun, while "the majority vote" is an example of it being used as an adjective.)

Example Question #80 : Synonyms

Select the word that has most nearly the same meaning as the word in capital letters.

ESTEEM

Possible Answers:

sincerity

congratulations

arrogant

estimation

regards

Correct answer:

regards

Explanation:

Although "regards" has several meanings, one of them is almost interchangeable with "esteem," which means judgement or opinion.

Note that "estimation," a similar-sounding word, is completely unrelated.

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