AP Biology : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP Biology

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

Example Questions

Example Question #71 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following is not true regarding Braxton Hicks contractions?

Possible Answers:

They are uterine contractions 

They signify the beginning of labor

They prepare the mother for childbirth

They occur throughout pregnancy

Correct answer:

They signify the beginning of labor

Explanation:

Braxton Hicks contractions are mild and irregular uterine contractions that are believed to prepare the mother for childbirth. The contractions may begin during the first trimester, but are often only noticed during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy.

Example Question #72 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following muscles contra to help deliver the baby during labor?

Possible Answers:

Vaginal

Fallopian

Uterine

Cervical

Correct answer:

Uterine

Explanation:

During labor, uterine contractions help dilate the cervix and descend the baby into the birth canal. As labor progresses, contractions become regular and occur more frequently. As the contractions continue to bear down on the fetus, the labor process is aided by maternal pushing.

Example Question #73 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following best describes the direct effect of uterine contractions during labor?

Possible Answers:

Both cervical dilation and fetal descent

Cervical dilation

Fetal descent

Neither fetal descent nor cervical dilation

Correct answer:

Both cervical dilation and fetal descent

Explanation:

Uterine contractions during labor help the fetus descend into the birth canal and aid cervical dilation.

Example Question #73 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following best describes what occurs physiologically when a woman’s “water breaks”? 

Possible Answers:

Descent of the baby into the birth canal

Detachment of the umbilical cord

Expulsion of the placenta

Rupture of the amniotic sac

Correct answer:

Rupture of the amniotic sac

Explanation:

The rupture of the amniotic sac during birth is commonly said to be when a woman’s “water breaks.” This typically occurs at the beginning of labor, but sometimes has to be ruptured by a medical professional. The rupture decreases cushioning of the fetus and increases pressure of the contractions, aiding the descent of the fetus into the birth canal.

Example Question #74 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following best describes when a pregnancy is considered to be “full term”?

Possible Answers:

37 to 38 weeks

30 to 31 weeks

39 to 41 weeks

33 to 35 weeks

Correct answer:

39 to 41 weeks

Explanation:

A woman is said to be “full term” when she is at 39 to 41 weeks of pregnancy. Medical intervention to induce labor during this time is not ideal.

Example Question #75 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following is a complication associated with pregnancy?

Possible Answers:

Ectopic pregnancy

Anemia

Preeclampsia

Postpartum depression

All of these

Correct answer:

All of these

Explanation:

Pregnancy related medical conditions and complications are incredibly common due to strain on the mother and extreme biological changes associated with pregnancy. Examples include postpartum depression, anemia, preeclampsia, and ectopic pregnancy.

Example Question #76 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following best describe methods that are used to prevent premature births?

Possible Answers:

Nutritional supplements

Avoiding stress

Screening for complications

Reducing the mother's activity

All of these

Correct answer:

All of these

Explanation:

Premature birth is the leading cause of death in newborns. While the exact causes of premature birth are not completely understood, certain methods may work to prevent it. These methods include nutritional supplements, avoiding stress, screening for complications, and reduction in activity.

Example Question #77 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following must occur in order to deliver the shoulders of the fetus?

Possible Answers:

Fetal rotation in the birth canal

The mother needs to stop pushing

Release of the placenta

Breech of the fetus

None of these

Correct answer:

Fetal rotation in the birth canal

Explanation:

In order to deliver the fetal shoulders, the fetus needs to rotate in the birth canal.

Example Question #78 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following best defines the delivery term “crowning”?

Possible Answers:

Appearance of the fetal head at the vagina

None of these

Dilation of the cervix to 10cm

Clamping of the umbilical cord

The rotation of the fetus to allow for shoulder delivery 

Correct answer:

Appearance of the fetal head at the vagina

Explanation:

During delivery, the term “crowning” refers to the appearance of the fetal head at the vaginal opening. This happens after the cervix is fully dilated and the mother begins pushing.

Example Question #79 : Understanding Other Reproductive Physiology

Which of the following is true regarding cervical dilation?

Possible Answers:

Cervical dilation is not incremental

Cervical dilation cannot be induced medically

Cervical dilation only occurs just before "crowning"

None of these

It is a result of uterine contractions

Correct answer:

It is a result of uterine contractions

Explanation:

Cervical dilation is the thinning and widening of the cervix to allow for fetal passage into the birth canal. Cervical dilation is a result of uterine contractions and may begin naturally or can be medically induced to start labor. As labor continues, the cervix will continue to dilate until reaching until it reaches 10cm. At this point, delivery can take place. Indicators of cervical dilation include the release of the mucus plug, blood, and pain.

Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors