3rd Grade Science : Investigate how unbalanced forces affect an object's motion

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for 3rd Grade Science

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Example Questions

Example Question #273 : 3rd Grade Science

This is an example of an unbalanced force.

Screen shot 2020 06 16 at 10.51.38 am

Possible Answers:

False

True

Correct answer:

True

Explanation:

This statement is accurate; this is an unbalanced force. There is a greater force being applied to one side of the object when compared to the opposite side. This object will have a change in motion because of the unequal force.

Example Question #274 : 3rd Grade Science

What is an unbalanced force? Example: Due to the unbalanced forces on each side of the dresser, we were not able to slide it across the floor.

Possible Answers:

An unbalanced force causes the object on which it is acting to accelerate, changing its position, speed, or direction due to equal forces on opposite sides.

An unbalanced force causes the object on which it is acting to accelerate, changing its position, speed, or direction due to unequal forces on the same side.

An unbalanced force does not affect an objects' motion, acceleration, speed, or position.

An unbalanced force causes the object on which it is acting to accelerate, changing its position, speed, or direction due to unequal forces on opposite sides.

Correct answer:

An unbalanced force causes the object on which it is acting to accelerate, changing its position, speed, or direction due to unequal forces on opposite sides.

Explanation:

Unbalanced forces are the opposite of a balanced force. An unbalanced force causes a change in motion, speed, direction, or movements because of unequal force or strength that is applied to one side of an object. Opposite sides have forces acting against them, but in the case of unbalanced forces, one side has more energy than the other.

Example Question #275 : 3rd Grade Science

How will the motion of the individual change due to the unbalanced forces?

Resist, Tug-Of-War, Cartoon, Strong

Possible Answers:

When the three players start to tug against the individual, he will move towards them and eventually win the game.

When the three players start to tug against the individual, he will move away from them and eventually win the game.

When the three players start to tug against the individual, he will move away from them and eventually lose the game.

When the three players start to tug against the individual, he will move towards them and eventually lose the game.

Correct answer:

When the three players start to tug against the individual, he will move towards them and eventually lose the game.

Explanation:

This graphic represents an unbalanced force. One individual player versus three players on the opposite team is not an equivalent amount of force or strength. The single-player will move towards the group of three when the pulling starts because they have more power than one player alone. The lone player will eventually lose the game when crossing over the center point due to an equal amount of force.

Example Question #276 : 3rd Grade Science

How can this graphic be edited to represent an unbalanced force?

Screen shot 2020 06 16 at 10.45.56 am

Possible Answers:

Add an arrow of equal side to the top and bottom of the object.

One arrow needs to be elongated to represent more force.

This graphic already represents an unbalanced force so no editing is needed.

Add an equal-sized arrow to the left and right sides, so there will be two arrows on each side.

Correct answer:

One arrow needs to be elongated to represent more force.

Explanation:

This graphic currently represents an object with balanced forces working on it. Each side has the same amount of force, so the object will not move. If one of the arrows is elongated, there will be an unequal distribution of force, so the object will move. Creating an unbalanced amount of strength on one side will change the object's motion.

Example Question #277 : 3rd Grade Science

If a toy car is rolling on a smooth surface and I push a heavier, faster toy car into it, how will its motion be affected?

Possible Answers:

The small toy car will move the heavier, faster car and then keep rolling.

The small toy car will change speed, direction, or may stop.

The small toy car will not be affected, and there will be no changes.

The heavier toy car will go flying off the surface when it makes contact with the small car.

Correct answer:

The small toy car will change speed, direction, or may stop.

Explanation:

In this scenario, there is an example of unbalanced forces. When an unbalanced force is applied to an object, there can be a change in motion. When a heavier, faster toy car moves into the path or side of the small car, it will cause the little vehicle to change speeds, directions, or even stop. This change in motion is due to a stronger force acting upon the small toy car.

Example Question #278 : 3rd Grade Science

How can this graphic be edited to represent an unbalanced force?

Illustration of Balanced Forces at work

Possible Answers:

None of the answer choices are correct.

Remove one of the people from either side of the box.

Add an extra person to the left side of the box.

Add an extra person to the right side of the box.

All of the answer choices are correct.

Correct answer:

All of the answer choices are correct.

Explanation:

This graphic currently represents an object with balanced forces working on it. Each side has the same amount of force, so the object will not move. If one of the people was removed or an extra person was added to either side, there will be an unequal distribution of force so that the object will move. Creating an unbalanced amount of strength on one side will change the object's motion.

Example Question #279 : 3rd Grade Science

Mrs. Gartrell's class is playing Tug-of-War to demonstrate how an unbalanced force will affect an object's motion. The class has twenty students, and they have to split into teams to represent an unbalanced force. J'Michael says they should divide evenly, ten on each side. Nate disagrees and says there should not be even teams; it should be the eight students against twelve students.

Who is correct, and why?

Possible Answers:

Neither student is correct. Their suggestions would not demonstrate an unbalanced force. They would need to change their set-up to have unbalanced forces.

They are both correct. Both of their ideas would work to show an example of an unbalanced force.

Nate is correct. Dividing the team into uneven numbers and uneven sizes will give one side more strength, which represents an unbalanced force.

J'Michael is correct. If the teams are split ten and ten, there will be equal strength on each side, which represents an unbalanced force.

Correct answer:

Nate is correct. Dividing the team into uneven numbers and uneven sizes will give one side more strength, which represents an unbalanced force.

Explanation:

In this situation, the students are trying to demonstrate an example of unbalanced forces. Unbalanced forces mean they are not even or the same. One side should have more energy than another when there are unbalanced forces. Nate is correct in this scenario; there should be uneven teams with different strengths on each side. To get the rope to move and one team to win, there has to be more strength on one side. When creating the teams, the side with the highest number of students would have more energy and strength, leading to an unbalanced force.

 

Example Question #280 : 3rd Grade Science

A toy train is rolling on a smooth surface. I am investigating how unbalanced forces affect an object's motion, so I push a heavy car into the train and then repeat it again but with a lighter car. What effect on the train's motion will I most likely notice?

Possible Answers:

The heavier car will change the train's direction or speed more than the lighter car will.

The lighter car will change the train's direction or speed more than the heavier car will.

The heavier car will change the train's direction or speed the same as the lighter car will.

Neither car will affect the train's motion.

Correct answer:

The heavier car will change the train's direction or speed more than the lighter car will.

Explanation:

In this scenario, there is an example of unbalanced forces. When an unbalanced force is applied to an object, there can be a change in motion. When the heavier toy car moves into the path or side of the train, it will cause the little vehicle to change speeds, directions, or even stop. This change in motion is due to a stronger force acting upon the toy train. The lighter car may have an impact on the train's movement, but it will not be as great.

Example Question #1 : Investigate How Unbalanced Forces Affect An Object's Motion

Which scenario is NOT an example of unbalanced forces?

Possible Answers:

Samantha and her twin sister play tug-of-war; it ends in a tie.

Steven pulls a door open so his mother can walkthrough.

Patrick pushes a vase off of the countertop.

Jeffery and his little brother crash into each other while rollerblading.

Correct answer:

Samantha and her twin sister play tug-of-war; it ends in a tie.

Explanation:

In the scenarios, "Samantha and her twin sister play tug-of-war; it ends in a tie." is NOT an example of unbalanced forces. The sisters are the same age, and we can assume the same size (they are twins) and the game neds in a tie. This means that they pulled with the same strength, and neither won. This would indicate that the forces were balanced during the tugging.

Example Question #2 : Investigate How Unbalanced Forces Affect An Object's Motion

Unbalanced forces are the opposite of a balanced force.

Possible Answers:

False

True

Correct answer:

True

Explanation:

An unbalanced force causes a change in motion, speed, direction, or movements because of unequal force or strength that is applied to one side of an object. Opposite sides have forces acting against them, but in the case of unbalanced forces, one side has more energy than the other. Unbalanced forces are the opposite of a balanced force.

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