Test: GMAT Verbal

Adapted from "Federalist No. 46. The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared" by James Madison in The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay (1788)

I proceed to inquire whether the federal government or the state governments will have the advantage with regard to the predilection and support of the people. Notwithstanding the different modes in which they are appointed, we must consider both of them as substantially dependent on the great body of the citizens of the United States. I assume this position here as it respects the first, reserving the proofs for another place. The federal and state governments are in fact but different agents and trustees of the people, constituted with different powers, and designed for different purposes. The adversaries of the Constitution seem to have lost sight of the people altogether in their reasonings on this subject, and to have viewed these different establishments not only as mutual rivals and enemies, but as uncontrolled by any common superior in their efforts to usurp the authorities of each other. These gentlemen must here be reminded of their error. They must be told that the ultimate authority, wherever the derivative may be found, resides in the people alone, and that it will not depend merely on the comparative ambition or address of the different governments, whether either, or which of them, will be able to enlarge its sphere of jurisdiction at the expense of the other. Truth, no less than decency, requires that the event in every case should be supposed to depend on the sentiments and sanction of their common constituents.

1.

What is the main idea of the passage?

The author discusses the relative unimportance of constituents in his country's current governmental system.

The author describes the features of the Constitution and the effects they may have on federal- and state-level government.

The author compares features of the federal and state governments and concludes that they are very different from one another.

The author compares the federal and state governments, and in doing so, argues that the ultimate source of a government's authority is the people it governs.

The author points out flaws in his opponents' arguments in order to oppose the Constitution.

1/41 questions

0%

Access results and powerful study features!

Take 15 seconds to create an account.
Start now! Create your free account and get access to features like:
  • Full length diagnostic tests
  • Invite your friends
  • Access hundreds of practice tests
  • Monitor your progress over time
  • Manage your tests and results
  • Monitor the progress of your class & students
By clicking Create Account you agree that you are at least 13 years old and you agree to the Varsity Tutors LLC Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.
Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors