AP European History : Elite and Popular Culture

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP European History

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

Example Questions

1 3 Next →

Example Question #21 : Elite And Popular Culture

This event caused so much suffering among the working classes that the institutions of democracy and capitalism came close to being overthrown throughout Europe.

Possible Answers:

The Oil Embargo of 1973

The Spanish Civil War

The Cold War

The Great Depression

World War I

Correct answer:

The Great Depression

Explanation:

The Great Depression began in the United States, but spread rapidly to Europe and around the world. It wrecked the economies of many European countries and caused widespread suffering and hunger among the working classes of Europe. The institutions of democracy and capitalism were heavily scrutinized across wide swaths of European society, and in many countries they were overthrown to be replaced by fascism, autocracy, or communism. Even in those countries that did not witness revolution, it was eminently possible, as working class or reactionary parties found favor in France, Britain, and elsewhere. The extreme deprivation created by the Great Depression essentially polarized a great deal of political thinking in Europe at the time. Fascism and communism, arguably the two most extreme alternatives to democracy at the opposite end of the political spectrum, both saw a massive rise in cultural and political prominence. While it can be argued that World War I directly contributed to, or at least exacerbated, many of the problems of the Great Depression, it was the financial crisis that directly gave rise to more revolutionary thought in the inter-war period.

Example Question #22 : Elite And Popular Culture

The erection of the Berlin Wall in 1961 by the __________ was intended to __________.

Possible Answers:

U.S.A. . . . prevent Soviet troops from crossing into West Berlin

U.S.S.R. . . . prevent East Germans from crossing into West Berlin

West Germans . . . prevent Soviet troops from crossing into West Berlin

U.S.S.R. . . . prevent West Germans from crossing into East Berlin

U.S.A. . . . prevent Soviet troops from crossing into East Berlin

Correct answer:

U.S.S.R. . . . prevent East Germans from crossing into West Berlin

Explanation:

When Berlin was captured at the end of the Second World War, it was quickly occupied by the Soviets, the Americans, the British, and the French. The country of Germany was divided into East Germany (communist and under Soviet control) and West Germany (capitalist and under American control). Berlin, which is located in East Germany, was divided into four sections, one for each of the invading powers. The French, British, and American sections were combined to form “West Berlin,” and the Soviet section became “East Berlin.” In 1961, in an attempt to prevent East Berliners from fleeing into West Germany, the Soviets erected the Berlin Wall. It came to represent a popular symbol of the fundamental divide, and underlying tension, of world relations during the Cold War. When it was torn down, almost thirty years later, it was like the physical representation of the disunity and suffering of the German people being torn down as well.

Example Question #21 : Elite And Popular Culture

The prosperity of the post war years in Europe (1945-1965) led to the emergence of a(n) __________ among lower and middle socioeconomic classes.

Possible Answers:

consumer culture

religious fervor

disdain for government

crisis of confidence

agrarian communal living

Correct answer:

consumer culture

Explanation:

The years after World War II witnessed a remarkable growth of prosperity in Western Europe and the United States. Class distinctions became much less important, and middle-class workers found themselves elevated to previously implausible levels of wealth and influence. This led to the emergence of a “consumer culture” among the common people, where the majority of people worked hard to buy the many things that were being sold to them as “fun,” “necessary,” “fashionable,” or “entertaining.” "Consumer culture" is often attributed to the proliferation of disposable income among increasingly varied socio-economic classes.

Example Question #24 : Elite And Popular Culture

__________ was a violent puppet show that became popular with British children during the Victorian era.

Possible Answers:

Lamb Chop

Charlie McCarthy

Punch and Judy

Bread and Puppet Theater

Bleekie

Correct answer:

Punch and Judy

Explanation:

Punch and Judy, imported from Italian comedic theater, was a popular marionette show in France, Britain, and the United States during the 18th century. It became more popular with children as the target audience in 19th century Britain.

Example Question #22 : Elite And Popular Culture

The Canterbury Tales was written by __________ and was unfinished when he died in 1400.

Possible Answers:

Geoffrey of Monmouth

Christopher Marlowe

John Milton

William Shakespeare

Geoffrey Chaucer

Correct answer:

Geoffrey Chaucer

Explanation:

Chaucer managed to write the Prologue, as well as 24 of 120 planned stories for The Canterbury Tales (1475). The other authors were not contemporaries of Chaucer. Geoffrey of Monmouth died in 1155, and none of the other choices were either alive or dead in the year 1400.

Example Question #23 : Elite And Popular Culture

In early 20th century Russia "Duma" referred to __________.

Possible Answers:

Political councils assembled to rule local districts after the overthrow of Czar Nicholas II

Russian army units, roughly equivalent in size to a battallion

None of these answers

Russian aristocrats, roughly similar in nature and title to British Dukes

Temporary representative groups attempting to represent the will of the people to the Czar Nicholas II

Correct answer:

Temporary representative groups attempting to represent the will of the people to the Czar Nicholas II

Explanation:

Duma were assembled councils created by Czar Nicholas II. While they were assembled to appease, and ostensibly give voice to, the people, the Duma were largely weakened by the fact that the Tzar retained the power to disband them, so although they attempted to represent common people's interests, they were still totally under the power of the Tzar, who would frequently dissolve them for suggesting actions with which he did not agree.

1 3 Next →
Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors