SAT Math : Decimals

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for SAT Math

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Example Questions

Example Question #351 : Arithmetic

Find the decimal equivalent of the fraction:

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the numerator by the denominator. Because the number in the numerator is smaller than the number in the denominator, you have to place the decimal point after it and add zeros. Then complete long division. In many cases, the decimal will not end, so the best thing to do is divide until you get four decimal places, then round accordingly. For this question that will look like this:

To perform long division make sure the value in the numerator is in the division symbol.

From here, we need to add a decimal point and zero because the inside value is less than the outside value.

    

Now, evaluate how many times 23 goes into 120. In this case, since 5 times 23 is 115, this is largest number possible without exceeding 120. From here subtract 115 from 120.

    

    

Now, evaluate how many times 23 goes into 50. Since 2 times 23 is 46, subtract that number from 50. 

    

  

    

    

Now, evaluate how many times 23 goes into 40, which in this case is only once. So multiply 1 times 23 to get 23, then subtract it from 40.

    

     

    

    

Since our answer choices only go to three decimal places, we are done. 

Therefore the answer is,

Example Question #351 : Arithmetic

Find the decimal equivalent of the fraction:

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the numerator by the denominator. Because the number in the numerator is smaller than the number in the denominator, you have to place the decimal point after it and add zeros. Then complete long division. In many cases, the decimal will not end, so the best thing to do is divide until you get four decimal places, then round accordingly. For this question that will look like this:

To perform long division make sure the value in the numerator is in the division symbol.

From here, we need to add a decimal point and zero because the inside value is less than the outside value.

    

Now, evaluate how many times 17 goes into 30, which in this case is only once. So multiply 1 times 17, then subtract it from 30.

    

 

    

Now, evaluate how many times 17 goes into 130. Since 7 times 17 is 119, that is the largest number possible without exceeding 130. So we subtract that number from 130. 

    

  

    

    

Now, evaluate how many times 17 goes into 110. Since 6 times 17 is 102, we will subtract that number from 110. 

    

     

    

   

Since our answer choices only go to three decimal places, we are done. 

Therefore the answer is,

Example Question #11 : How To Find The Decimal Equivalent Of A Fraction

Find the decimal equivalent of the fraction:

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the numerator by the denominator. Because the number in the numerator is smaller than the number in the denominator, you have to place the decimal point after it and add zeros. Then complete long division. In many cases, the decimal will not end, so the best thing to do is divide until you get four decimal places, then round accordingly. For this question that will look like this:

To perform long division make sure the value in the numerator is in the division symbol.

From here, we need to add a decimal point and zero because the inside value is less than the outside value.

    

Now, evaluate how many times 44 goes into 50, which in this case is only once. So multiply 1 times 44, then subtract it from 50.

    

  

     

Now, evaluate how many times 44 goes into 60, which again is only once. So we multiply 1 times 44 and subtract that number from 60. 

    

  

    

  

    

Now, evaluate how many times 44 goes into 160. Since 44 times 3 is 132, we will subtract that number from 160 because it the largest possible number without exceeding 160. 

    

     

       

   

       

   

Since our answer choices only go to three decimal places, we are done. 

Therefore the answer is,

Example Question #11 : Decimals With Fractions

Find the decimal equivalent of the fraction:

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the numerator by the denominator. Because the number in the numerator is smaller than the number in the denominator, you have to place the decimal point after it and add zeros. Then complete long division. In many cases, the decimal will not end, so the best thing to do is divide until you get four decimal places, then round accordingly. For this question that will look like this:

To perform long division make sure the value in the numerator is in the division symbol.

From here, we need to add a decimal point and zero because the inside value is less than the outside value.

    

Now, evaluate how many times 11 goes into 90. Since, 11 time 8 is 88, which is the largest number without exceeding 90. So subtract 88 from 90.

    

  

     

Now, evaluate how many times 11 goes into 20, which is only once. So we multiply 1 times 11 and subtract that number from 20. 

    

  

    

  

    

Now, evaluate how many times 11 goes into 90. Since we already know this number is 88, we will subtract that from 90 because it the largest possible number without exceeding 90. 

    

     

       

   

       

   

Since our answer choices only go to three decimal places, we are done. 

Therefore the answer is,

Example Question #12 : Decimals

Find the decimal equivalent of the fraction:

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the numerator by the denominator. Because the number in the numerator is smaller than the number in the denominator, you have to place the decimal point after it and add zeros. Then complete long division. In many cases, the decimal will not end, so the best thing to do is divide until you get four decimal places, then round accordingly. For this question that will look like this:

To perform long division make sure the value in the numerator is in the division symbol.

From here, we need to add a decimal point and zero because the inside value is less than the outside value.

    

Now, evaluate how many times 24 goes into 100. We know that 24 times 4 is 96, which is the largest possible number without exceeding 100. So subtract 96 from 100.

    

     

        

Now, evaluate how many times 24 goes into 40, which is only once. So we multiply 1 times 24 and subtract that number from 40. 

    

     

        

     

       

Now, evaluate how many times 24 goes into 160. Since 6 times 24 is 144, we will subtract that from 160 because it the largest possible number without exceeding 160. 

    

     

       

   

       

   

Since our answer choices only go to three decimal places, we are done. 

Therefore the answer is,

Example Question #11 : Decimals With Fractions

Find the decimal equivalent of the fraction:

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the numerator by the denominator. Because the number in the numerator is smaller than the number in the denominator, you have to place the decimal point after it and add zeros. Then complete long division. In many cases, the decimal will not end, so the best thing to do is divide until you get four decimal places, then round accordingly. For this question that will look like this:

To perform long division make sure the value in the numerator is in the division symbol.

From here, we need to add a decimal point and zero because the inside value is less than the outside value.

    

Now, evaluate how many times 17 goes into 80. We know that 17 times 4 is 68, which is the largest possible number without exceeding 80. So subtract 68 from 80.

    

   

      

Now, evaluate how many times 17 goes into 120. Since 7 times 17 is 119, subtract that number from 120.

    

   

        

     

       

Since 17 doesn't go into 10, we have to put a zero in after the 7 and move on to the next place. Now, evaluate how many times 17 goes into 100. Since 5 times 17 is 85, we will subtract that from 100 because it the largest possible number without exceeding 100. 

    

     

       

   

       

   

Our answer choices only go to three decimal places, but we have four. So before we are done, we must round accordingly. 

Therefore the answer is,

Example Question #11 : How To Find The Decimal Equivalent Of A Fraction

Find the decimal equivalent of the fraction:

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the numerator by the denominator. Because the number in the numerator is smaller than the number in the denominator, you have to place the decimal point after it and add zeros. Then complete long division. In many cases, the decimal will not end, so the best thing to do is divide until you get four decimal places, then round accordingly. For this question that will look like this:

To perform long division make sure the value in the numerator is in the division symbol.

From here, we need to add a decimal point and zero because the inside value is less than the outside value.

    

Now, evaluate how many times 5 goes into 30. We know that 5 times 6 is 30 and can subtract accordingly.

    

 

     

Since subtraction gave us zero, we are done. 

Therefore the answer is,

Example Question #11 : Decimals

Find the decimal equivalent of the fraction:

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the numerator by the denominator. Because the number in the numerator is smaller than the number in the denominator, you have to place the decimal point after it and add zeros. Then complete long division. In many cases, the decimal will not end, so the best thing to do is divide until you get four decimal places, then round accordingly. For this question that will look like this:

To perform long division make sure the value in the numerator is in the division symbol.

From here, we need to add a decimal point and zero because the inside value is less than the outside value.

    

Now, evaluate how many times 26 goes into 130. We know that 5 times 26 is 130 and can subtract accordingly.

    

   

       

Since subtraction gave us zero, we are done. 

Therefore the answer is,

Example Question #13 : Decimals With Fractions

Find the decimal equivalent of the fraction:

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

To find the decimal equivalent of a fraction, divide the numerator by the denominator. Because the number in the numerator is smaller than the number in the denominator, you have to place the decimal point after it and add zeros. Then complete long division. In many cases, the decimal will not end, so the best thing to do is divide until you get four decimal places, then round accordingly. For this question that will look like this:

To perform long division make sure the value in the numerator is in the division symbol.

From here, we need to add a decimal point and zero because the inside value is less than the outside value.

    

Now, evaluate how many times 15 goes into 60. We know that 4 times 15 is 60 and can subtract accordingly.

    

   

        

Since subtraction gave us zero, we are done. 

Therefore the answer is,

Example Question #13 : How To Find The Decimal Equivalent Of A Fraction

_______ 

 

Which of the following numbers can be written in the blank to make that a true statement?

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

Convert each fractions to its decimal equivalent by dividing numerator by denominator, as follows:

Division

The number in the blank falls between 0.272 and 0.286; the only such choice is 0.28.

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