GMAT Verbal : Correcting Conjunction Errors

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for GMAT Verbal

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Example Questions

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Example Question #5 : Correcting Subordinating Conjunction Errors

Replace the underlined portion with the answer choice that results in a sentence that is clear, precise, and meets the requirements of standard written English.

Some prescription drugs can produce dangerous interactions when combined with other chemicals, and you should always tell your physician about any medications you take at home.

Possible Answers:

and you should always tell your physician about any medications you take at home.

and you should always be telling your physician about any medications you take at home.

but you should always tell your physician about any medications you take at home.

although you should always tell your physician about any medications you take at home.

so you should always tell your physician about any medications you take at home.

Correct answer:

so you should always tell your physician about any medications you take at home.

Explanation:

This sentence contains an error in its logic of cause and effect. The first part of the sentence is the reason for the advice offered in the second part. So, you should change "and" to a word that demonstrates the cause-and-effect relationship. Do not add a contrast word like "but" or "although" unless the sentence includes some sort of contradiction or opposition.

Example Question #41 : Correcting Conjunction Errors

Replace the underlined portion with the answer choice that results in a sentence that is clear, precise, and meets the requirements of standard written English.

The highway, which is notorious for its terrible potholes, was closed on Monday, and I had to take an alternate route to work.

Possible Answers:

The highway, which is notorious for its terrible potholes, was closed on Monday, and I had to take an alternate route to work.

The highway, which is notorious for its terrible potholes, was closed on Monday, so I had to take an alternate route to work.

The highway, which is notorious for its terrible potholes, was closed on Monday, or I had to take an alternate route to work.

The highway, which is notorious for its terrible potholes and was closed on Monday, I had to take an alternate route to work.

The highway, which is notorious for its terrible potholes, was closed on Monday, although I had to take an alternate route to work.

Correct answer:

The highway, which is notorious for its terrible potholes, was closed on Monday, so I had to take an alternate route to work.

Explanation:

Based on the information in this sentence, we can infer that there is a cause-and-effect relationship: as a result of the highway being closed, the speaker had to take a different route to work. “So” is the only conjunction here that indicates cause and effect.

Example Question #42 : Correcting Conjunction Errors

Replace the underlined portion with the answer choice that results in a sentence that is clear, precise, and meets the requirements of standard written English.

Since our family had never before been to Seattle, so our restaurant selection was a shot in the dark based on advice from others.

Possible Answers:

Since our family had never before been to Seattle; so our restaurant selection was a shot in the dark based on advice from others.

Since our family had never before been to Seattle, our restaurant selection was a shot in the dark based on advice from others.

Since our family had never before been to Seattle so our restaurant selection was a shot in the dark based on advice from others.

Since our family had never before been to Seattle; our restaurant selection was a shot in the dark based on advice from others.

Since our family had never before been to Seattle, so our restaurant selection was a shot in the dark based on advice from others.

Correct answer:

Since our family had never before been to Seattle, our restaurant selection was a shot in the dark based on advice from others.

Explanation:

Each of the clauses in this sentence starts with a subordinating conjunction. This makes for an ill-crafted sentence. Only one of the two clauses should start like this. Deleting either "since" or "so" would make this sentence better. Beginning two consecutive clauses with subordinating conjunctions will almost always result in either a contradiction or a redundancy.

Example Question #43 : Correcting Conjunction Errors

Replace the underlined portion with the answer choice that is clear, precise, and meets the requirements of standard written English.

Because the company lacked the proper funds to launch the new research project, so they turned back to the board of directors to ask for a relatively minor additional investment. 

Possible Answers:

The company, lacking the proper funds to launch the new research project, so they turned back to the board of directors

The company lacked the proper funds to launch the new research project, they turned back to the board of directors

The company lacked the proper funds to launch the new research project, so they turned back to the board of directors

Because the company lacked the proper funds to launch the new research project so they turned back to the board of directors

Because the company lacked the proper funds to launch the new research project; they turned back to the board of directors

Correct answer:

The company lacked the proper funds to launch the new research project, so they turned back to the board of directors

Explanation:

This sentence, as written, has an issue with its subordinating conjunctions. Both of its clauses start with these conjunctions - one with "because" and one with "so." This is problematic. The sentence, to be grammatical, can only have one of these clauses start with such a conjunction. Either one could be deleted to make the sentence grammatically correct - "because," in this case.

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