LSAT Logic Games : Solving three-variable logic games

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for LSAT Logic Games

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Example Questions

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Example Question #61 : Solving Three Variable Logic Games

Chef Henri has six dinner specialties, A, B, C, D, E, and F. One dinner specialty, and only one dinner specialty, is presented on the menu for each evening the restaurant is open, which is Monday through Saturday (closed Sunday).

The following conditions must hold:

Free wine is served with C or D, but not for both, and free wine is served only on Tuesday or Wednesday. A must be served earlier in the week than B and C.

If B is served on Thursday, then B is served earlier in the week than E and F.

If B is not served on Thursday, then B is served later in the week than E and F.

Either D or E is served on Friday.

If D is served on Monday, then which one of the following could be false?

Possible Answers:

E is served on Friday.

A is served on Tuesday.

C is served on Wednesday.

B is served on Saturday.

C is the dinner specialty served with free wine.

Correct answer:

B is served on Saturday.

Explanation:

This is a tricky question because of the way it is phrased (not uncommon on the LSAT).  It does NOT ask which item MUST be false, but only which one COULD BE false.  The best way to proceed is to eliminate the ones that must be true (which is really what the question is calling for--identifying what must be true).  If D is served on Monday, then A must be served on Tuesday and C must be served on Wednesday.  Why?  Because C must be served on free-wine day (Tues or Wed), since D is not an option given that it is served on Monday, and A must precede C.  We also know for sure that E is served on Friday, since Friday is reserved only for D or E, but D is taken up for Monday.  Thus, we can eliminate all the choices except for the proposition that B is served on Saturday.  Note that B could be served on Saturday, but it is not required.  Therefore, that proposition COULD BE FALSE.

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