ISEE Upper Level Verbal : Synonyms: Verbs About Communicating, Arguing, and Understanding

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Upper Level Verbal

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Example Questions

Example Question #61 : Synonyms: Verbs About Communicating, Arguing, And Understanding

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DEIFY

Possible Answers:

Disobey

Myth

Violate

Statue

Venerate

Correct answer:

Venerate

Explanation:

The word “deify” literally means “to make into a God.” The “-fy” prefix is used in many places in English to mean “to make or do” as in “falsify” and “nullify.” The “dei-” portion of the word is derived from a large cluster of “god-related” words such as “deity” and “deism,” as well as “theology” and “atheist.” (The “d” and “th” are related sounds.) When someone deifies someone else, they are likely to worship that person as a god. Therefore, the best option here is “venerate,” which means “to revere someone or something.”

Example Question #62 : Synonyms: Verbs About Communicating, Arguing, And Understanding

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ACCOST

Possible Answers:

Persuade

Negate

Fumble

Waylay

Destroy

Correct answer:

Waylay

Explanation:

"Accost" is a verb that means "approach and address someone boldly or aggressively," so we need to pick out an answer choice that means something like "approach and address aggressively." Of the potential answer choices, "waylay," a verb that means "stop or interrupt someone and detain them in conversation or trouble them in some other way," is the answer choice closest in meaning to "accost," so "waylay" is the correct answer.

Example Question #63 : Synonyms: Verbs About Communicating, Arguing, And Understanding

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

JEST

Possible Answers:

Fool

Harlequin

Disparagement

Quip

Belittling

Correct answer:

Quip

Explanation:

You likely know the word “jester,” and think of it in terms of the “fool” with a strange looking hat. These persons would act foolishly for the sake of some high official—like a personal late night comedian always on call. When one “jests,” he or she makes a joke. For instance, one can say, “The young man joked about the manners of girl for whom he had affection. Since she knew that it was not malicious but in jest, she welcomed his flirtatious quips.” Jesting need not pertain to flirting, but the point here is that the jesting was kindly joke not a nasty remark.

Example Question #64 : Synonyms: Verbs About Communicating, Arguing, And Understanding

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

REPRIMAND

Possible Answers:

Scold

Praise

Inquisition

Question

Laud

Correct answer:

Scold

Explanation:

The word “reprimand” most properly applies to expressions of disapproval or correction that are directed from one in authority to someone under his or her authority. For instance, one could say, “The CEO reprimanded the entire marketing team for its poor performance and laziness this quarter, informing them that if they continued in this delinquency, layoffs would occur in great numbers.” Although “scold” does not necessarily carry the sense of authority, as is the case with “reprimand,” it is the closest of the options provided.

Example Question #65 : Synonyms: Verbs About Communicating, Arguing, And Understanding

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

INTIMATE

Possible Answers:

Overwhelm

Waver

Insinuate

Leverage

Hide

Correct answer:

Insinuate

Explanation:

"Intimate" is a word that can be used as a noun, verb, or adjective, but because all of the answer choices can be used as verbs, we will need to consider "intimate" as a verb. When used as a verb, "intimate" means either "imply or hint" or "state or make known." So, we need to pick out an answer choice that means something like "imply" or something like "state." "Hide," then, cannot be the correct answer, because "hide" is an antonym of "make known" and does not mean the same thing as "imply or hint." "Insinuate," however, is a verb that means "suggest or hint (something bad or reprehensible) in an indirect and unpleasant way," and because "insinuate" is the answer choice closest in meaning to "intimate," "insinuate" is the correct answer.

Example Question #66 : Synonyms: Verbs About Communicating, Arguing, And Understanding

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DOTE

Possible Answers:

Plunge

Engagement

Occasion

Pamper

Obligation

Correct answer:

Pamper

Explanation:

Most often, we use the term “dote” with the preposition “on.” For example, “Sally doted on the old man at the restaurant, for she reminded him of her grandfather whom she had so dearly loved.” Generally, the expression “dote on” is used to describe when someone is very fond of another person, often expressing that fondness in a very effusive and perhaps uncritical manner. It is like “spoiling” the person on whom the doting occurs. It can imply that the one “being doted on” is feeble, though this need not be the case.

Example Question #231 : Identifying Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

SLANDER

Possible Answers:

Criminal

Extortion

Corruption

Defame

Illegal

Correct answer:

Defame

Explanation:

When someone slanders another person, he or she makes a statement that damages that other person’s reputation. In general, the act of damaging someone’s reputation can be called “defaming” him or her. The word “slander” comes from the Latin word very closely related to “scandal.”

Example Question #41 : Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

BEWILDER

Possible Answers:

Anger

Vex

Confuse

Collide

Blind

Correct answer:

Confuse

Explanation:

Although “bewilder” is a verb, we often use it in its perfect passive participle form, “bewildered,” or in its present active participle form, “bewildering.” When it is used in the former sense, it means perplexed or confused. For example, we can say, “He was utterly bewildered by the questions being asked by the child, for he could only understand the sorts of questions asked by people who were his own age.” When used as a verb, “bewilder” merely means to cause confusion or perplexity. For example, one could say, “Questions bewilder the man and make him extremely confused and angry.”

Example Question #61 : Synonyms: Verbs

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

BEWILDER

Possible Answers:

Vex

Blind

Collide

Confuse

Anger

Correct answer:

Confuse

Explanation:

Although “bewilder” is a verb, we most often use it in its perfect passive participle form, “bewildered,” or in its present active participle form, “bewildering.”   When it is used in the former sense, it means “perplexed” or “confused.” For example, we can say, “He was utterly bewildered by the questions being asked by the child, for he could only understand the sorts of questions asked by people who were his own age.” When used as a verb, “bewilder” merely means “to cause confusion or perplexity.” For example, one could say, “Questions bewilder the man and make him extremely confused and angry.”

Example Question #234 : Identifying Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

RATIFY

Possible Answers:

Reject

Inspire

Follow

Approve

Demonstrate

Correct answer:

Approve

Explanation:

"Ratify" is a verb that means "sign or give formal consent to a treaty, contract, or agreement, making it officially valid." So, "reject" cannot be the correct answer because "reject" is an antonym of "ratify," not a synonym. "Approve" is a verb that means "officially agree to or accept as satisfactory" or "believe that someone or something is good or acceptable," and because it is the answer choice closest in meaning to "ratify," it is the correct answer.

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