AP Human Geography : Using Maps

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP Human Geography

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Example Questions

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Example Question #492 : Ap Human Geography

Which of these is the set of imaginary lines that run east-west, parallel to the equator? They allow us to determine how far north and south locations are from the equator.

Possible Answers:

Meridians

Longitude lines

Latitude lines

The Rose lines

Coordinates

Correct answer:

Latitude lines

Explanation:

Lines of latitude measure the distance North or South of the Equator and run East-West on a globe or map.

Example Question #493 : Ap Human Geography

Which of these is the set of curving imaginary lines that run North-South, coming together at the poles. They allow us to determine how far East or West locations are from the Prime Meridian. 

Possible Answers:

Longinus lines

Rose lines

Lines of longitude

Parallels

Lines of latitude

Correct answer:

Lines of longitude

Explanation:

Lines of longitude are the set of curving imaginary lines that run North-South, coming together at the poles. They measure distance, in degrees, East or West of the Prime Meridian.

Example Question #494 : Ap Human Geography

What is a thematic map?

Possible Answers:

A map that serves to teach others about another culture's native language. 

A map that conveys a particular theme associated with a geographic area.

A map that is readily accessible in K-12 classrooms across the world.

A map that is often used by nautical explorers to chart the distance to the nearest source of land. 

A map that utilizes symbols to convey the approximate size of a geographic area.

Correct answer:

A map that conveys a particular theme associated with a geographic area.

Explanation:

A thematic map is a type of map that is designed to show a theme connected with a specific geographic area. For example, a thematic map may serve to convey population growth disparities across U.S. states.

Example Question #495 : Ap Human Geography

List the types of regions studied in human geography.

Possible Answers:
  1. Formal/uniform
  2. Functional/nodal
  3. Perceptual/vernacular
  1. Dispersed/scattered
  2. Clustered/agglomerated
  1. Absolute
  2. Relative
  1. Hierarchical
  2. Contagious
  3. Stimulus
  1. Hearth
  2. Relocation
  3. Expansion
Correct answer:
  1. Formal/uniform
  2. Functional/nodal
  3. Perceptual/vernacular
Explanation:

Formal or uniform, functional or nodal, and perceptual or vernacular are all types of regions. You will see each called by either or both names.

Example Question #83 : Geography

Which of these lists the characteristics of the geographic grid?

Possible Answers:
  1. Accessibility
  2. Connectivity
  3. Network
  4. Distance decay
  5. Friction of distance
  6. Time-space compression
  1. Thematic
  2. Statistical
  3. Cartogram
  4. Dot
  5. Choropleth
  6. Isoline
  1. Hearth
  2. Relocation
  3. Expansion
  4. Hierarchical
  5. Contagious
  6. Stimulus
  7. Absolute
  8. Relative
  1. Formal
  2. Uniform
  3. Functional
  4. Nodal
  5. Perceptual
  6. Vernacular
  1. North and South Poles
  2. Latitude lines
  3. Parallels
  4. The equator
  5. Longitude lines
  6. Meridians
  7. The prime meridian
  8. The international date line
Correct answer:
  1. North and South Poles
  2. Latitude lines
  3. Parallels
  4. The equator
  5. Longitude lines
  6. Meridians
  7. The prime meridian
  8. The international date line
Explanation:

The global grid consists of north and south poles, latitude lines or parallels, the equator, longitude lines or meridians, the prime meridian, and the international date line.

Example Question #21 : Using Maps

The distance between time zones is approximately how many degrees?

Possible Answers:

50 degrees longitude

22 degrees latitude

15 degrees longitude

15 degrees latitude

22 degrees longitude

Correct answer:

15 degrees longitude

Explanation:

Time zones are separated by approximately 15 degrees longitude. Since there are 24 hours in 1 day, there are 24 time zones on Earth. As the Earth completes one full rotation of 360 degrees in 24 hours, the distance between time zones in degrees can be found by dividing 360 degrees by 24 time zones.

360/24 = 15 degrees per time zone

The correct answer is 15 degrees longitude. The Earth rotates horizontally around its axis, so time zones would be drawn from North to South. Longitudinal lines run North to South, making lines of longitude the correct choice.

Example Question #501 : Ap Human Geography

For which of the following purposes would a Mercator Projection be a poor choice?

Possible Answers:

showing where Africa is in relation to Europe

showing lines of latitude and longitude

showing the distortion that results from creating projections

navigating by ship between Europe and North America

visualizing population density

Correct answer:

visualizing population density

Explanation:

The Mercator Projection would be a very poor choice for depicting population density because the projections creates large distortions in landmasses near the poles. This issue makes the Mercator Projection inappropriate for showing land area-based data like population densities.

The Mercator Projection was created for ship navigation, so the projection would be a good choice for navigating between Europe and North America by ship. A Mercator Projection could be used to show where Africa is in relation to Europe because the land-mass distortions occur most at the poles. The Mercator Projection is able to depict lines of latitude and longitude effectively. Because the Mercator Projection has substantial distortion at the poles, it would be a good choice for showing the distortion that occurs from creating projections.

Example Question #501 : Ap Human Geography

There are many different kinds of map projections. No map can show true shape, true size, and true direction at the same time. One or more of these are lost in the process of taking the world, a three-dimensional object, and projecting it onto a two-dimensional plane. That being said, different map projections have different ways of projecting the earth onto a two-dimensional way, distorting one or more aspect of the representation of earth.

True Direction is shown everywhere on which particular map projection?

Possible Answers:

Robinson Projection

Mollweide Projection

Mercator Projection

True Map Projection

Conic Projection

Correct answer:

Mercator Projection

Explanation:

The Mercator Projection, designed by Gerardus Mercator in 1569, became the standard map projection used for nautical purposes because it correctly represents true direction everywhere on earth on a two-dimensional plane. It is a conformal map projection, which properly shows all lines of longitude and latitude on a grid plane with correct 90 degree angle crossing points throughout the map.

The Robinson Projection was created by Arthur Robinson, coming late to the map-making game in 1963. Robinson's projection is not an equal-area projection or a conformal projection, but rather is a combination of both. Robinson's projection shows the entire earth and distorts both shape and size slightly to make the two-dimensional representation look the most like the three-dimensional reality of the earth. Robinson's projection, though losing true shape, size, and direction, is the most widely used projection today.

The Conic Projection is not a specific projection, but rather is any map projection which equally spaces meridians radiating out from whatever the apex of the map is. Meanwhile, lines of latitudes (parallels) are mapped as circular arcs centered on the map's apex. Most commonly, the apex of conic map projections is the center of the north or south pole. This projection type is most often used to more accurately map the north or south pole.

The True Map Projection is not a map projection, it is a made-up term for the purposes of this quiz.

The Mollweide Projection was developed by Carl Mollweide in 1805. This map projection is a equal-area and pseudo-cylindrical representation of the earth. Instead of showing accuracy of angle in lines of latitude and longitude, or accuracy of shape, it distorts both of those factors in order to show accuracy of size in area throughout the entire world. It is only on this map projection that one can see the true size of the continents in relation to each other. On all other map projections, the continent of Africa looks much smaller than it actually is, distorting the size and often the shape as well. But with this map projection, the shape might be slightly skewed in order to gain the benefit of seeing the true large size that Africa boasts in comparison to the rest of the world.

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