A photo of Elias, a tutor from Ruhr Universitaet Bochum

Elias

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I live by the following motto. "You teach what you are, so be something worth teaching". My goal is to get the students to the Eureka's moment, when they realize that the subject matter is actually enlightening. My background is diverse as I’m a very curious individual. I studied Political Science and Foreign languages at Ruhr Universitaet in Bochum, Germany. There I spent 4 years teaching students both French and German. Then I went to Concordia University to study Finance and graduated with a MBA. My engineering mindset titillates me to get a Master of Science in Software Engineering from the University of St Thomas. I have worked in Finance, mostly in Investment both retail and institutional, during which I have consistently taught French, English and German on the side. My passion has always been languages. I speak six different languages. Now, I work as an IT Consultant for 3M.

Elias’ Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Ruhr Universitaet Bochum - Bachelors, Political Science and Foreign Languages

Graduate Degree: University of St Thomas - Masters, Software Engeneering

Hobbies

Reading, drumming, biking, enjoying nature.


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

In my teaching philosophy, there are two main elements: the teacher and the motivation. The teacher: a teacher needs to help his or her students realize their full potential. My role as a teacher is, in addition to conveying knowledge on the subject that I teach, to make my students grow and to make them aware of the world around them, and the elements that compose it, either at the level of the history of humanity, the religions around them, or even the scientific basis of the world in which we live. In addition to having better academic results, they will have the chance to become better humans, which motivation teaching must be, above all, a passion. A teacher who teaches to earn his bread and does not feel more concerned than that with his work will by definition be a bad teacher. One of the characteristics that makes me a good teacher is the fact that I do not want to work only for what it brings me as material goods, but also because I have a real passion which is enough to motivate me to teach. "You teach what you are, so be something worth teaching."

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

A typical first session is an opportunity to introduce myself, go over the program the student is working on, evaluate the student's strengths and weaknesses, and put together a plan for success.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

An essential element of independent learning is a positive relationship between teachers and students based on trust. A mutual responsibility for learning, which will draw in students' experiences in their family and local community, is also necessary.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

They are a couple of ways to help students be motivated. Below are a few examples: plan for every class; never try to wing it. Pay attention to the strengths and limitations of each of the students. Reward their strengths and strengthen their weaknesses. Review the learning objectives with the students. Be sure students know what they are expected to learn, do, know, etc. Be expressive. Smile. Put some excitement into the speech; vary your pitch, volume, and rate. Give lots of examples. Encourage students to share their ideas and comments, even if they are incorrect. You'll never know what students don't understand unless you ask them. Provide opportunities for students to speak to the class. Be available. Provide constructive feedback.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I will figure out what the student is struggling with and approach the concept from a direction that deals with that problem.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

I can help the students use different strategies to sharpen his/her reading comprehension. The below strategies could be helpful: identify where the difficulty occurs, identify what the difficulty is, restate the difficult sentence or passage in their own words, look back through the text, and look forward in the text for information that might help them to resolve the difficulty.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

I allow the student to work at his/her own pace. I validate the student's concerns and break complex issues into smaller ones. I always ask recurring questions to engage the students.