A photo of Chelsea, a tutor from Temple University

Chelsea

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Hello! I am here to help :) I am one of those few folks who thinks Math is fun. I see math problems as puzzles that can be solved, we just have to do more thinking than with a typical puzzle. I am most confident with Algebra 1 & 2 and Geometry, so if you find yourself struggling in those areas, I could be of some assistance.

I am a 20 year old Architecture student at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA. I take interest in all types of design and art. I, myself, am a visual learner; I understand the struggle of not being able to grasp content simply because you just cannot see it. I hope for my artistic background to be of helpful use for students who need that visual component.

I am very patient and encouraging. I believe in you so that you can build the confidence to believe in yourself!

Chelsea’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Temple University - Current Undergrad, Architecture

Hobbies

art & design, music, cooking, cartoons, reading, working out


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

Effort + interest = success!

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I'd encourage them through every step of the problem. Also, when they get something wrong, I'd teach them that making mistakes is how everyone learns.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I would relate the concept to something they are familiar with. I'd also utilize my drawing skills to make the concept more visual, if needed.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

Reading comprehension issues can be addressed by having the student paraphrase what they read (every paragraph or so) so that they have to actually think about and process the content.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

Encouraging the student, giving them time to think before answering (without feeling rushed), and breaking any problems that give them trouble down into step-by-step bits are all successful strategies.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

I'd show them how the subject can apply to real-life situations. Also, I'd motivate them to do well simply because achieving understanding of a difficult subject is a rewarding feeling!

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

After covering the material, we'd do a few practice problems together, and then the student would have to do them independently to show they are confident.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

This is done by consistently reassuring the student that they can master anything they put their mind to. Building a student's confidence in a subject is also achieved by having them work on problems alone and creating problems that can be solved, too.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

I evaluate a student's needs by first asking them what they believe their own strengths and weaknesses are. This can then be evaluated further by having them do practice problems and taking note of where they seem to be hesitant.

How do you adapt your tutoring to the student's needs?

I adapt to my student's tutoring needs by asking them if they are comfortable with the content throughout the session and ensuring that the learning pace is not too fast or too slow.

What types of materials do you typically use during a tutoring session?

Calculators, pencils, paper, and sometimes a cell phone or laptop for internet access.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I'd get to know the student's interests outside of school so that we can try to relate the subject matter to things that excite them.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I help students become independent learners by having them do practice problems, then correcting them until they no longer make mistakes. I'd also have them create their own practice problems.