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Jack

I'm a recent grad from Northwestern (B.A. in Theatre and Economics) who loves teaching and learning. I love helping other people achieve their goals and helping students find ways to be their best selves. Excited to meet and work with Chicagoland's students!

Undergraduate Degree:

Northwestern University - Bachelors, Economics/Theatre

ACT Composite: 35

ACT English: 35

ACT Math: 35

ACT Reading: 35

ACT Science: 36

Theatre, Improv, Arabic, Jogging, Folk Music

American Literature

Business

College Accounting

College Business

College Economics

College English

College Level American Literature

Comparative Literature

Fiction Writing

High School Accounting

High School Business

High School Economics

High School English

High School Level American Literature

Homework Support

Macroeconomics

Other

Shakespeare

Study Skills

Study Skills and Organization

Summer

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

First sessions always start with discussion of a subject's foundations. If we nail these, the rest of the learning becomes ten times easier.

What is your teaching philosophy?

I'm big on listening. It's my job to hear what a client needs instead of jumping right into practice problems or revisions. First, we talk about goals. Then, we set up a timeline and steps for how to achieve those goals.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I approach sessions with a lot of focus. We work to build consistency in tackling subjects so that the tools used in tutoring sessions improve long-term study techniques.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I like to think in terms of "why." Tests aren't a reward in themselves. It's important to identify a personal reason for wanting to achieve a certain grade or score.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I would ask the student to explain their understanding starting from the basics. Often, academic difficulty comes from teachers skipping over little holes in understanding that grow over time.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

Read out loud. I'm an actor, so I'm a huge proponent of acting out text, even if it's not written to be performed.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

I think that's the most interesting part of a tutor's job--getting to find the ways to make a subject personal for a student. I love talking with students to connect coursework to their passions/life experiences.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

I think practice tests are good diagnostic measures, but I like to prefer conversations about the material. This tells me if the student understands the material as opposed to how to take the test.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

I like to discuss the idea of intent. An author doesn't write for the sake of writing, just as a scientist doesn't build graphs for the sake of building a graph. These are tools that people are using to communicate something underneath. Once we reframe to focus on intent, interpreting information becomes a lot more engaging.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

I identify where the student is a rock star. These areas are like little lighthouses on tests. When test panic sets in, my students always know what type of problems they can go to get a confidence boost. I'm also a big believer in habit. If my students are developing strong study habits and rituals, they don't have to walk into a test and hope for the best, they know exactly what they are doing and can do it fearlessly.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

If a student is struggling, I ask them to walk me through the fundamentals of the problem. A lot of times, this helps me find holes from when they first learned a topic in the classroom. We also talk about learning styles, strategies that have helped them in the past, and what they are looking to get out of tutoring.

How do you adapt your tutoring to the student's needs?

When working problems, I always try to talk less than my students. This helps me pick up on cues as to what they are asking for in terms of help.

What types of materials do you typically use during a tutoring session?

I'm a huge fan of pen/paper. This helps me build creative exercises that fit the student's needs. For example, I just did a session where I had my student speed-draw all the imagery in an ACT reading passage. I also love recommending books/articles for outside reading (not specifically test prep, but challenging, engaging texts).