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Reid

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I am an econ-math student, attending NYU. As a result, I am specifically interested in students who need help in math, economics, and, well, the ACT. I love to challenge students as a means to provoke their curiosity in these subjects. Outside of academics, I am an avid soccer fan; I produce music; and I ski.

Reid’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: New York University - Current Undergrad, Economics-Mathematics

Test Scores

ACT Composite: 33

ACT English: 35

ACT Math: 32

ACT Reading: 33

ACT Science: 31

Hobbies

Soccer, music and skiing


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

Patience is essential to working with a student. Additionally, I like to begin with the fundamentals. With those two elements combined, we can accomplish a lot together.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

Derive it or demonstrate it conceptually. You must be patient, and you must dissect the problem into his most fundamental terms. I would use what we know then to answer the question.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

I want them to annotate and constantly summarize what they are reading along the margins of the text.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

Patience is essential to working with a student. Additionally, I like to begin with the fundamentals. With those two elements combined, we can accomplish a lot together.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

As I previously mentioned, I must encourage the student. In other words, I must provoke their curiosity. When I took physics, for instance, my teacher derived each equation using a series of labs and experiments. I think I can accomplish a similar task, but with math or economics.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

I would offer them challenge problems. Problems that are intended to apply what they have learned. It is not enough to memorize a formula or a pattern, but it has proven effective if the student can apply his/her knowledge to the question.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

Again, encouragement. When the student succeeds, I succeed. As a result, I want to compliment the student on a job well done when the student accomplishes a task or a tricky problem.