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Neha

I am a current graduate student at the University of Illinois Chicago (UIC). I have a major in Biological Sciences and a minor in Psychology from UIC and am now studying public health and medicine in an MD/MPH program. I started tutoring throughout my undergraduate career and have since worked with students in a variety of settings, both in person and online. I have tutored students all around Chicago, from kindergarten through high school, towards academic success in all subjects.

For me, tutoring is a personalized experience. As I work with students, I learn how to adapt to their needs, relate seemingly uninteresting topics to their life, and think outside the box to explain a concept to them that may be particularly challenging or unclear. Through specialized individual attention, students became confident in their own abilities and began to develop into young scholars. Tutoring provided a means of reviewing and solidifying my own knowledge of topics as I taught it to my students while allowing me to pass my love of learning on to others.

Some of my hobbies include working out, traveling, and photography. In my spare time, I can often be found exploring all of the wonderful festivals and restaurants Chicago has to offer!

Undergraduate Degree:

University of Illinois at Chicago - Bachelors, Biological Sciences

Graduate Degree:

University of Illinois at Chicago - Masters, Public Health

ACT Composite: 35

ACT English: 36

ACT Math: 35

ACT Reading: 32

ACT Science: 36

tennis, running, photography, traveling

What is your teaching philosophy?

I first start with fundamentals to create a solid base upon which further knowledge can be built. I then tackle concepts and ensure that these concepts are clear and understood through discussion, practice problems, and review before moving on. I encourage my students to ask questions, think aloud, and be an active participant in their education.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I like to get to know my students and understand their academic goals, both long- and short-term. I have the student do practice questions that become increasingly difficult so I can see where they struggle and what areas I need to focus on most with them. I also encourage the student to take diagnostic tests for test prep to provide me with a more complete understanding of what level they are at.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

Rather than spoon-feed my students, I encourage them to think aloud. This helps the student become confident in their thinking process, as well as forces them to explain each step they took to arrive at the answer. This overall practice then translates over when students are faced with a difficult problem on homework or an exam.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I remain patient with my students and try to explain the concept using different examples that may relate better to that specific student. I provide them with practice problems that test their understanding of the skill and walk them through the first few problems before asking them to attempt the next one alone. I will continue to briefly review that concept in future sessions until the student has mastered the skill.