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Question of the Day: SAT II Literature

Adapted from "The Convalescent" in Essays of Elia by Charles Lamb (1823)

To be sick is to enjoy monarchal prerogatives. Compare the silent tread, and quiet ministry, almost by the eye only, with which he is served—with the careless demeanor, the unceremonious goings in and out (slapping of doors, or leaving them open) of the very same attendants, when he is getting a little better—and you will confess, that from the bed of sickness (throne let me rather call it) to the elbow chair of convalescence, is a fall from dignity, amounting to a deposition.

How convalescence shrinks a man back to his pristine stature! Where is now the space, which he occupied so lately, in his own, in the family's eye? The scene of his regalities, his sick room, which was his presence chamber, where he lay and acted his despotic fancies—how is it reduced to a common bedroom! The trimness of the very bed has something petty and unmeaning about it. It is made every day. How unlike to that wavy, many-furrowed, oceanic surface, which it presented so short a time since, when to make it was a service not to be thought of at oftener than three or four day revolutions, when the patient was with pain and grief to be lifted for a little while out of it, to submit to the encroachments of unwelcome neatness, and decencies which his shaken frame deprecated; then to be lifted into it again, for another three or four days' respite, to flounder it out of shape again, while every fresh furrow was a historical record of some shifting posture, some uneasy turning, some seeking for a little ease; and the shrunken skin scarce told a truer story than the crumpled coverlid

Hushed are those mysterious sighs—those groans—so much more awful, while we knew not from what caverns of vast hidden suffering they proceeded. The Lernean pangs are quenched. The riddle of sickness is solved; and Philoctetes is become an ordinary personage.

Perhaps some relic of the sick man's dream of greatness survives in the still lingering visitations of the medical attendant. But how is he too changed with everything else! Can this be he--this man of news—of chat—of anecdote—of everything but physic—can this be he, who so lately came between the patient and his cruel enemy, as on some solemn embassy from Nature, erecting herself into a high mediating party? Pshaw! 'Tis some old woman.

Farewell with him all that made sickness pompous—the spell that hushed the household—the desert-like stillness, felt throughout its inmost chambers—the mute attendance—the inquiry by looks—the still softer delicacies of self-attention—the sole and single eye of distemper alonely fixed upon itself—world-thoughts excluded—the man a world unto himself—his own theatre—What a speck is he dwindled into!

In the fourth paragraph, the author's attitude towards the doctor changes from __________ to __________.

condescension . . . disappointment

awe . . . appreciation

aggrandizement . . . contempt

expectancy . . . scorn

indifference . . . dependence

When applying to universities, it is imperative that you understand the requirement involved. Each institute had their own set of needs that must be included along with your application. Without follow through, it is possible your application with either be overlooked or pushed back. Today, many universities require students to not only submit their scores from the SAT or ACT, but also from up to three different SAT Subject Tests. These Subject Tests cover a variety of topics to give the admissions staff a general idea of your strengths. If you are serious about Literature, consider taking the SAT II Literature Subject Test. This exam is broken down into 60 multiple-choice questions designed to showcase your talents in this area. Not only can this test improve your application, but it can also possibly lead to your admission into higher level programs. As such, it is important that you put your best foot forward on the day of the test.

Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools offer a range of free daily test review materials for your use. Each tool offers its own unique take on the SAT II Subject Test in Literature, from aiding in memorization to providing a mock examination. Learning Tools Flashcards, Learn by Concept, Practice Tests, and Question of the Day can be used independently or combined for a full SAT II Literature Subject Test review.

Question of the Day is a Learning Tool designed to supplement your current study methods. The problems provided by this tool will give you a better insight into what you should expect to see on the SAT II Literature Subject Test. This exam will test your knowledge on American, British, and other forms of literature composed in the English language. You will be expected to utilize basic literary terms and concepts as you read through prose, poetry, and dramatic works from the 17th century and beyond.

Using Question of the Day is easy. Each day, you will login to view a newly selected problem reminiscent to those found on the actual examination. After carefully selecting an answer, you will be granted access to information that can assist you with developing your skills. Each question, regardless of how it was answered, is followed up with an explanation and a deeper look into the featured concept. Similar questions are also provided for you to view and work through. With Question of the Day, you have the ability to keep your progress in check. By reviewing past questions you have worked with, keeping track of your speed, and checking in with your correct-to-incorrect ratio, you can better determine the areas that need the most of your attention. Question of the Day also provides you with the tools to compare your progress to that of others. Discover many students have answered the question correctly and where you place on a percentile ranking. As you continue to solve problems, you will gain a better insight into your own abilities. To get the most out of Question of the Day, it is highly encouraged that you participate regularly.

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