Varsity Tutors always has a different SAT II Literature Question of the Day ready at your disposal! If you’re just looking to get a quick review into your busy day, our SAT II Literature Question of the Day is the perfect option. Answer enough of our SAT II Literature Question of the Day problems and you’ll be ready to ace the next test. Check out what today’s SAT II Literature Question of the Day is below.

Question of the Day: SAT II Literature

  And first, truly, to all them that, professing learning, inveigh against poetry, may justly be objected that they go very near to ungratefulness, to seek to deface that which, in the noblest nations and languages that are known, hath been the first light-giver to ignorance, and first nurse, whose milk by little and little enabled them to feed afterwards of tougher knowledges. And will they now play the hedgehog, that, being received into the den, drave out his host? Or rather the vipers, that with their birth kill their parents?

Let learned Greece in any of her manifold sciences be able to show me one book before Musæus, Homer, and Hesiod, all three nothing else but poets. Nay, let any history be brought that can say any writers were there before them, if they were not men of the same skill, as Orpheus, Linus, and some other are named, who, having been the first of that country that made pens deliver of their knowledge to their posterity, may justly challenge to be called their fathers in learning. For not only in time they had this priority—although in itself antiquity be venerable—but went before them, as causes to draw with their charming sweetness the wild untamed wits to an admiration of knowledge. So as Amphion was said to move stones with his poetry to build Thebes, and Orpheus to be listened to by beasts,—indeed stony and beastly people. So among the Romans were Livius Andronicus and Ennius; so in the Italian language the first that made it aspire to be a treasure-house of science were the poets Dante, Boccaccio, and Petrarch; so in our English were Gower and Chaucer, after whom, encouraged and delighted with their excellent fore-going, others have followed to beautify our mother tongue, as well in the same kind as in other arts. 

(1595)

The author's tone in this passage could best be described as ___________________.

insincere and apathetic

didactic and earnest

sarcastic and bitter

nostalgic and sorrowful

angry and vehement

When applying to universities, it is imperative that you understand the requirement involved. Each institute had their own set of needs that must be included along with your application. Without follow through, it is possible your application with either be overlooked or pushed back. Today, many universities require students to not only submit their scores from the SAT or ACT, but also from up to three different SAT Subject Tests. These Subject Tests cover a variety of topics to give the admissions staff a general idea of your strengths. If you are serious about Literature, consider taking the SAT II Literature Subject Test. This exam is broken down into 60 multiple-choice questions designed to showcase your talents in this area. Not only can this test improve your application, but it can also possibly lead to your admission into higher level programs. As such, it is important that you put your best foot forward on the day of the test.

Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools offer a range of free daily test review materials for your use. Each tool offers its own unique take on the SAT II Subject Test in Literature, from aiding in memorization to providing a mock examination. Learning Tools Flashcards, Learn by Concept, Practice Tests, and Question of the Day can be used independently or combined for a full SAT II Literature Subject Test review.

Question of the Day is a Learning Tool designed to supplement your current study methods. The problems provided by this tool will give you a better insight into what you should expect to see on the SAT II Literature Subject Test. This exam will test your knowledge on American, British, and other forms of literature composed in the English language. You will be expected to utilize basic literary terms and concepts as you read through prose, poetry, and dramatic works from the 17th century and beyond.

Using Question of the Day is easy. Each day, you will login to view a newly selected problem reminiscent to those found on the actual examination. After carefully selecting an answer, you will be granted access to information that can assist you with developing your skills. Each question, regardless of how it was answered, is followed up with an explanation and a deeper look into the featured concept. Similar questions are also provided for you to view and work through. With Question of the Day, you have the ability to keep your progress in check. By reviewing past questions you have worked with, keeping track of your speed, and checking in with your correct-to-incorrect ratio, you can better determine the areas that need the most of your attention. Question of the Day also provides you with the tools to compare your progress to that of others. Discover many students have answered the question correctly and where you place on a percentile ranking. As you continue to solve problems, you will gain a better insight into your own abilities. To get the most out of Question of the Day, it is highly encouraged that you participate regularly.

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