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Question of the Day: SAT II Literature

Passage adapted from Cape Cod by Henry David Thoreau (1865) 

Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Charleston, New Orleans, and the rest, are the names of wharves projecting into the sea (surrounded by the shops and dwellings of the merchants), good places to take in and to discharge a cargo (to land the products of other climes and load the exports of our own). I see a great many barrels and fig-drums, piles of wood for umbrella-sticks, blocks of granite and ice, great heaps of goods, and the means of packing and conveying them, much wrapping-paper and twine, many crates and hogsheads and trucks, and that is Boston. The more barrels, the more Boston. The museums and scientific societies and libraries are accidental. They gather around the sands to save carting. The wharf-rats and customhouse officers, and broken-down poets, seeking a fortune amid the barrels. Their better or worse lyceums, and preachings, and doctorings, these, too, are accidental, and the malls of commons are always small potatoes....

When we reached Boston that October, I had a gill of Provincetown sand in my shoes, and at Concord there was still enough left to sand my pages for many a day; and I seemed to hear the sea roar, as if I lived in a shell, for a week afterward.

The places which I have described may seem strange and remote to my townsmen, indeed, from Boston to Provincetown is twice as far as from England to France; yet step into the cars, and in six hours you may stand on those four planks, and see the Cape which Gosnold is said to have discovered, and which I have so poorly described. If you had started when I first advised you, you might have seen our tracks in the sand, still fresh, and reaching all the way from the Nauset Lights to Race Point, some thirty miles, for at every step we made an impression on the Cape, though we were not aware of it, and though our account may have made no impression on your minds. But what is our account? In it there is no roar, no beach-birds, no tow-cloth.

Which of the following best describes the author's rhetorical strategy in the underlined section?

He plays upon the reader's prejudice against Boston

He implies that Provincetown does not make a lasting impression

He implies that the best way to experience Provincetown is through the written word

He implies that the written word is inadequate to describe Provincetown

He implies that Provincetown is impossible to understand

When applying to universities, it is imperative that you understand the requirement involved. Each institute had their own set of needs that must be included along with your application. Without follow through, it is possible your application with either be overlooked or pushed back. Today, many universities require students to not only submit their scores from the SAT or ACT, but also from up to three different SAT Subject Tests. These Subject Tests cover a variety of topics to give the admissions staff a general idea of your strengths. If you are serious about Literature, consider taking the SAT II Literature Subject Test. This exam is broken down into 60 multiple-choice questions designed to showcase your talents in this area. Not only can this test improve your application, but it can also possibly lead to your admission into higher level programs. As such, it is important that you put your best foot forward on the day of the test.

Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools offer a range of free daily test review materials for your use. Each tool offers its own unique take on the SAT II Subject Test in Literature, from aiding in memorization to providing a mock examination. Learning Tools Flashcards, Learn by Concept, Practice Tests, and Question of the Day can be used independently or combined for a full SAT II Literature Subject Test review.

Question of the Day is a Learning Tool designed to supplement your current study methods. The problems provided by this tool will give you a better insight into what you should expect to see on the SAT II Literature Subject Test. This exam will test your knowledge on American, British, and other forms of literature composed in the English language. You will be expected to utilize basic literary terms and concepts as you read through prose, poetry, and dramatic works from the 17th century and beyond.

Using Question of the Day is easy. Each day, you will login to view a newly selected problem reminiscent to those found on the actual examination. After carefully selecting an answer, you will be granted access to information that can assist you with developing your skills. Each question, regardless of how it was answered, is followed up with an explanation and a deeper look into the featured concept. Similar questions are also provided for you to view and work through. With Question of the Day, you have the ability to keep your progress in check. By reviewing past questions you have worked with, keeping track of your speed, and checking in with your correct-to-incorrect ratio, you can better determine the areas that need the most of your attention. Question of the Day also provides you with the tools to compare your progress to that of others. Discover many students have answered the question correctly and where you place on a percentile ranking. As you continue to solve problems, you will gain a better insight into your own abilities. To get the most out of Question of the Day, it is highly encouraged that you participate regularly.

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