Varsity Tutors always has a different SAT II Literature Question of the Day ready at your disposal! If you’re just looking to get a quick review into your busy day, our SAT II Literature Question of the Day is the perfect option. Answer enough of our SAT II Literature Question of the Day problems and you’ll be ready to ace the next test. Check out what today’s SAT II Literature Question of the Day is below.

Question of the Day: SAT II Literature

Adapted from Act 1, Scene 1, ln. 78-119 of The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus by Christopher Marlowe (1604) in Vol. XIX, Part 2 of The Harvard Classics (1909-1914)

 

FAUST: How am I glutted with conceit of this!

Shall I make spirits fetch me what I please,

Resolve me of all ambiguities,

Perform what desperate enterprise I will?

I’ll have them fly to India for gold,

Ransack the ocean for orient pearl,

And search all corners of the new-found world

For pleasant fruits and princely delicates;

I’ll have them read me strange philosophy

And tell the secrets of all foreign kings;

I’ll have them wall all Germany with brass,

And make swift Rhine circle fair Wittenberg;

I’ll have them fill the public schools with silk,

Wherewith the students shall be bravely clad;

I’ll levy soldiers with the coin they bring,

And chase the Prince of Parma from our land,

And reign sole king of all the provinces;

Yea, stranger engines for the brunt of war

Than was the fiery keel at Antwerp’s bridge,

I’ll make my servile spirits to invent.

[Enter VALDES and CORNELIUS] 

Come, German Valdes and Cornelius,

And make me blest with your sage conference.

Valdes, sweet Valdes, and Cornelius,

Know that your words have won me at the last

To practice magic and concealed arts:

Yet not your words only, but mine own fantasy

That will receive no object, for my head

But ruminates on necromantic skill.

Philosophy is odious and obscure,

Both law and physic are for petty wits;

Divinity is basest of the three,

Unpleasant, harsh, contemptible, and vile:

’Tis magic, magic, that hath ravish’d me.

Then, gentle friends, aid me in this attempt;

And I that have with concise syllogisms

Gravell’d the pastors of the German church,

And made the flowering pride of Wittenberg

Swarm to my problems, as the infernal spirits

On sweet Musaeigus, when he came to hell,

Will be as cunning as Agrippa was,

Whose shadows made all Europe honor him.

Which of the following is NOT a reasonable inference to draw about Faustus' feelings on his situation?

He has been offered the use of dark arts, and he is excited by the power this opportunity could afford him.

He has had a long and successful academic career, but feels that he has reached the limit of earthly, academic pursuits.

He must choose between earthly academic pursuits and the dark arts, and he finds the new path of magic exciting.

He has had a long and successful academic career which has led him to feel superior to and bored with those around him.

He must choose between earthly academic pursuits and the dark arts, and he feels ambivalent about the decision.

When applying to universities, it is imperative that you understand the requirement involved. Each institute had their own set of needs that must be included along with your application. Without follow through, it is possible your application with either be overlooked or pushed back. Today, many universities require students to not only submit their scores from the SAT or ACT, but also from up to three different SAT Subject Tests. These Subject Tests cover a variety of topics to give the admissions staff a general idea of your strengths. If you are serious about Literature, consider taking the SAT II Literature Subject Test. This exam is broken down into 60 multiple-choice questions designed to showcase your talents in this area. Not only can this test improve your application, but it can also possibly lead to your admission into higher level programs. As such, it is important that you put your best foot forward on the day of the test.

Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools offer a range of free daily test review materials for your use. Each tool offers its own unique take on the SAT II Subject Test in Literature, from aiding in memorization to providing a mock examination. Learning Tools Flashcards, Learn by Concept, Practice Tests, and Question of the Day can be used independently or combined for a full SAT II Literature Subject Test review.

Question of the Day is a Learning Tool designed to supplement your current study methods. The problems provided by this tool will give you a better insight into what you should expect to see on the SAT II Literature Subject Test. This exam will test your knowledge on American, British, and other forms of literature composed in the English language. You will be expected to utilize basic literary terms and concepts as you read through prose, poetry, and dramatic works from the 17th century and beyond.

Using Question of the Day is easy. Each day, you will login to view a newly selected problem reminiscent to those found on the actual examination. After carefully selecting an answer, you will be granted access to information that can assist you with developing your skills. Each question, regardless of how it was answered, is followed up with an explanation and a deeper look into the featured concept. Similar questions are also provided for you to view and work through. With Question of the Day, you have the ability to keep your progress in check. By reviewing past questions you have worked with, keeping track of your speed, and checking in with your correct-to-incorrect ratio, you can better determine the areas that need the most of your attention. Question of the Day also provides you with the tools to compare your progress to that of others. Discover many students have answered the question correctly and where you place on a percentile ranking. As you continue to solve problems, you will gain a better insight into your own abilities. To get the most out of Question of the Day, it is highly encouraged that you participate regularly.

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