Varsity Tutors always has a different LSAT Reading Question of the Day ready at your disposal! If you’re just looking to get a quick review into your busy day, our LSAT Reading Question of the Day is the perfect option. Answer enough of our LSAT Reading Question of the Day problems and you’ll be ready to ace the next test. Check out what today’s LSAT Reading Question of the Day is below.

The Law School Admission Test is the preliminary requirement ahead of getting into law school in North America, as well as a few other countries. The test is designed to evaluate your abilities based on three types of questions: reasoning logically and analytically, and reading comprehension skills. There are five total sections with multiple-choice questions that evaluate your abilities based on those critical concepts. You are given complex, dense, and intricate passages that you need to be able to understand, and use for or against an argument. Lawyers need to be able to make sense of these complicated texts, particularly when they are helping a client comprehend the jargon. Whether you need top LSAT tutors in New YorkLSAT tutors in Chicago, or top LSAT tutors in Los Angeles, working with a pro may take your studies to the next level. Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools also offer you a variety of materials to use to prepare for the LSAT Reading section. You can get free test practice daily through the Question of the Day alone. 

The questions you may be asked throughout the LSAT Reading section typically focus heavily on how newly introduced evidence and information can impact the argument at hand. These questions take skill to trace out the author’s claims and what implications they have, along with what is presented as the basis for the information. You may need to predict the author’s stance on a topic, or determine the purpose behind a passage. Varsity Tutors also offers resources like free LSAT Reading Practice Tests to help with your self-paced study, or you may want to consider an LSAT Reading tutor.

When you use the Question of the Day, you are given a variety of questions that come straight from the LSAT Reading practice tests. These cover a wide range of concepts. You need to be able to analyze comparisons between reading passages, effects of new information on previously read content, and extrapolate conclusions from these comparisons. You will need to be able to analyze humanities passages, such as main ideas, details, phrasing and vocabulary based on context, authorial tones and attitudes, organization and structures, identifying purpose, new information that strengthens, weakens or otherwise effects arguments, parallel reasoning, inferences based on information, and analogous cases. You may be given law-oriented questions, such as analyzing law passages for main idea, details, vocabulary comprehension, tone and attitude, purpose, structure, and organization, as well as information that affects passages, drawing inferences, parallel reasoning, and analogous cases. You will also work with science and social science passages. In addition to the LSAT Reading Question of the Day and LSAT Reading tutoring, you may also want to consider using some of our LSAT Reading Flashcards

To maximize your performance on the LSAT Reading section, you need to take the time to diligently prepare for it by taking advantage of free LSAT Reading practice. You can effectively practice your skills to ensure they are fine tuned for the test. There are numerous Learning Tools to choose from that are designed to supplement your studies, refresh your mind, and provide valuable study aid. The Question of the Day offers you daily practice for the test. You can also take full-length practice tests to evaluate your progress, preparation, and weak points. These can be great for identifying the concepts that you need to work with the most. Then you can use the Learn by Concept tool to delve deeper into those concepts.

With Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools, you can work with concepts on a deeper level. Whether you use the practice tests, Learn by Concept, Question of the Day, or all of them, you can get valuable practice before you take the LSAT.

Question of the Day: LSAT Reading

Adapted from an essay by Ralph Waldo Emerson in The Oxford Book of American Essays (1914)

It is natural to believe in great men. If the companions of our childhood should turn out to be heroes, and their condition regal, it would not surprise us. All mythology opens with demigods, and the circumstance is high and poetic; that is, their genius is paramount. In the legends of the Gautama, the first men ate the earth, and found it deliciously sweet.

Nature seems to exist for the excellent. The world is upheld by the veracity of good men: they make the earth wholesome. They who lived with them found life glad and nutritious. Life is sweet and tolerable only in our belief in such society, and actually or ideally we manage to live with superiors. We call our children and our lands by their names. Their names are wrought into the verbs of language, their works and effigies are in our houses, and every circumstance of the day recalls an anecdote of them.

The search after the great is the dream of youth and the most serious occupation of manhood. We travel into foreign parts to find his works—if possible, to get a glimpse of him. But we are put off with fortune instead. You say the English are practical; the Germans are hospitable; in Valencia the climate is delicious; and in the hills of the Sacramento there is gold for the gathering. Yes, but I do not travel to find comfortable, rich, and hospitable people, or clear sky, or ingots that cost too much. But if there were any magnet that would point to the countries and houses where are the persons who are intrinsically rich and powerful, I would sell all, and buy it, and put myself on the road today.

The people go with us on their credit. The knowledge that in the city is a man who invented the railroad raises the credit of all the citizens. But enormous populations, if they be beggars, are disgusting, like moving cheese, like hills of ants or of fleas—the more, the worse.

Our religion is the love and cherishing of these patrons. The gods of fable are the shining moments of great men. We run all our vessels into one mould. Our colossal theologies of Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, are the necessary and structural action of the human mind. The student of history is like a man going into a warehouse to buy clothes or carpets. He fancies he has a new article. If he goes to the factory, he shall find that his new stuff still repeats the scrolls and rosettes which are found on the interior walls of the pyramids of Thebes. Our theism is the purification of the human mind. Man can paint, or make, or think nothing but man. He believes that the great material elements had their origin from his thought. And our philosophy finds one essence collected or distributed.

Other men are lenses through which we read our own minds. I count him a great man who inhabits a higher sphere of thought, into which other men rise with labor and difficulty; he has but to open his eyes to see things in a true light, and in large relations, whilst they must make painful corrections and keep a vigilant eye on many sources of error. His service to us is of like sort. It costs a beautiful person no exertion to paint his or her image on our eyes; yet how splendid is that benefit! It costs no more for a wise soul to convey his quality to other men. And everyone can do his best thing easiest. He is great who is what he is from nature, and who never reminds us of others.

Which one of the following best captures the author's attitude toward great men in the first two paragraphs?

They are no better than our childhood friends.

Our attitudes towards them are instinctive.

They should be rightly worshipped.

They should be geniuses.

They are akin to gods.

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