NCLEX : Musculoskeletal System and Anatomy

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for NCLEX

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Example Questions

Example Question #11 : Musculoskeletal System And Anatomy

Which of the following bony landmarks of the skull is an attachment point for the splenius capitis, the longissimus capitis, and the posterior belly of the digastric muscle?

Possible Answers:

The mandibular condyle

The mastoid process

The coronoid process

The styloid process

Correct answer:

The mastoid process

Explanation:

The splenius capitis, the longissimus capitis, and the posterior belly of the digastric muscle all attach to the mastoid process, a bony protuberance on the inferior border of the temporal bone. This landmark is also an attachment point for the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The styloid process of the temporal bone is directly anterior to the mastoid process, and is an attachment point for multiple ligaments and the styloglossus muscle, the stylohyoid muscle, and the stylopharyngeus muscle. The mandibular condyle and coronoid process are both part of the mandible and do not form any attachments to the muscles of the neck. 

Example Question #11 : Bone Identification

The inferior alveolar nerve exits through what opening in the skull?

Possible Answers:

The mental foramen

The foramen rotundum

The greater palatine foramen

The supraorbital foramen

Correct answer:

The mental foramen

Explanation:

The inferior alveolar nerve exits through the mental foramina of the chin. This nerve is a branch of the mandibular nerve and supplies sensory innervation to the lower teeth. The foramen rotundum transmits the maxillary nerve. The supraorbital foramina transmit the supraorbital artery, vein, and nerve. The greater palatine foramen is located in the palatine bone and transmits the greater palatine nerve, artery, and vein.

Example Question #12 : Bone Identification

The falx cerebri attaches anteriorly to the skull at what landmark?

Possible Answers:

The cribiform plate

The crista galli

The ethmoidal labyrinth

The orbital plate

Correct answer:

The crista galli

Explanation:

The falx cerebri, the dura that separates the two hemispheres of the brain, attaches to a bony projection of the ethmoid bone called the crista galli, or "crest of the rooster." This projection is a distinct landmark that arises from the cribiform plate. The ethmoidal labyrinth and orbital plate do not form any attachments to the dura of the brain. 

Example Question #11 : Musculoskeletal System And Anatomy

The supraspinatus tendon passes under what bony projection of the scapula?

Possible Answers:

The acromion

The spine of the scapula

The superior angle of the scapula

The coracoid process

Correct answer:

The acromion

Explanation:

The supraspinatus tendon passes under the acromion, a bony hook-like process at the end of the scapular spine. Inflammation of the supraspinatus muscle or tendon can quickly lead to entrapment of this muscle under the acromion, causing pain and reduced mobility. The coracoid process, another projection from the anterior scapula, is an attachment point for several muscles and ligaments, including the pectoralis minor and the short head of the biceps brachii. 

Example Question #11 : Bone Identification

What is the large, fan-like ridge of bone that can be palpated just below the waist?

Possible Answers:

The iliac crest

The anterior superior iliac spine

The greater sciatic notch

The anterior inferior iliac spine

Correct answer:

The iliac crest

Explanation:

The large, fan-like ridge of bone that can be felt just under the waist is the iliac crest. The anterior superior iliac spine and the anterior inferior iliac spine are smaller protuberances on the ilium that are important landmarks for assessing malpositions of the bones of the sacroiliac joint. The greater sciatic notch is in the posterior ilium and serves as a passage for several muscles and nerves of the pelvic girdle.

Example Question #14 : Musculoskeletal System And Anatomy

The head of the femur rests in what bony feature of the pelvis?

Possible Answers:

The pubic tubercle

The acetabulum

The pubic symphysis

The obturator foramen

Correct answer:

The acetabulum

Explanation:

The head of the femur rests in the acetabulum, a bony socket on the lateral pelvis that is formed by all three bones of the innominate (the ischium, ilium, and the pubis). The pubic symphysis is a midline cartilaginous joint between the pubic bones. The obturator foramen is an opening in the innominate through which multiple nerves and vessels pass. The pubic tubercle is a bony projection on the pubis that serves as an attachment point for inguinal ligament.

Example Question #501 : Nclex

What bone of the foot forms the heel?

Possible Answers:

The navicular

The calcaneus

The talus

The cuboid

Correct answer:

The calcaneus

Explanation:

All of the bones listed form the posterior portion of the foot. The largest bone in the foot is the calcaneus. It forms the heel and articulates with the bones of the ankle.

Example Question #11 : Musculoskeletal System And Anatomy

What is the name for the bones that form the anterior portion of the foot (but not the toes)?

Possible Answers:

The metatarsals

The metacarpals

The carpals

The phalanges

Correct answer:

The metatarsals

Explanation:

The bones that form the anterior half of the foot (but not the toes) are the metatarsals. These are mirrored in the metacarpal bones of the hand. The carpal bones form the wrist, and the phalanges form the toes and the fingers.

Example Question #191 : General Biology

Which of the following bones does not form part of the pelvis?

Possible Answers:

The ischium

The ileum

The sacrum

The ilium

The pubis

Correct answer:

The ileum

Explanation:

The pelvis is formed by the sacrum and coccyx and the three bones that come together to form the innominate: the ilium, ischium, and the pubis. The ileum is a part of the small intestine. 

Example Question #11 : Musculoskeletal System And Anatomy

Which of the following structures passes through the superior orbital fissure?

Possible Answers:

All of these

The ophthalmic nerve (cranial nerve V, branch V1)

The superior and inferior divisions of oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve III)

The trochlear nerve (cranial nerve IV)

The abducens nerve (cranial nerve VI)

Correct answer:

All of these

Explanation:

The superior orbital fissure, an opening in the back of the orbit formed by the lesser and greater wings of the sphenoid bone, has several important structures passing through it. These include the ophthalmic nerve (CN V1), the abducens nerve (CN VI), the trochlear nerve (CN IV), and the superior and inferior divisions of oculomotor nerve (CN III). It also transmits various blood vessels and the sympathetic fivers from the cavernous plexus. Injury to this area can cause a wide range of ocular pathologies including pain, diplopia, ptosis, exophthalmos, and vision impairment or vision loss.

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