A photo of Kelly, a tutor from Worcester State College

Kelly

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I have been teaching at the college level since 1990. I have taught courses in English, History, and Humanities. I have taught at schools all over the country, and at both single sex and co-ed institutions. I have also worked as Director of a college Writing Studio.

Recently I have begun working with middle and high school aged students who are homeschooled--teaching essay writing, literature, and history online or through homeschool co-ops.

I also have experience with test prep, including the SAT/ACT and entrance exams for post-college study.

Kelly’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Worcester State College - Bachelors, English and History

Graduate Degree: University of Connecticut - Masters, Medieval Studies

Hobbies

cooking, reading, TV, movies, knitting

Tutoring Subjects

Ancient and Medieval Heritage

College English

College Essays

Comparative Literature

English

Essay Editing

High School English

Literature

Medieval Literature

Other

Social studies

Summer

Writing


Q & A

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

Finding a way to connect that topic to something the student is already interested in can be helpful. For example, if a student loves the Harry Potter books, showing what that series took from early literature might help make a connection to Medieval or Renaissance works.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

Asking a student to explain a concept to me. If he or she can "teach" me about it, then understanding has probably been achieved.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

Highlighting what a student already knows or showing how a student already uses these skills without realizing it.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

Asking where and how a student struggles, and what topics seem particularly problematic. Self-diagnosis is often helpful, but then I would follow through with some questions of my own to make sure.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

Find out a little about the student. Ask about the class, the assignment, and the time frame that the student has to work with. Go over some general introductory things to get a sense of where he or she is and what is needed.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

Teach the student the skills to figure things out on his or her own--not simply provide the answers.