Varsity Tutors always has a different SSAT Middle Level Reading Question of the Day ready at your disposal! If you’re just looking to get a quick review into your busy day, our SSAT Middle Level Reading Question of the Day is the perfect option. Answer enough of our SSAT Middle Level Reading Question of the Day problems and you’ll be ready to ace the next test. Check out what today’s SSAT Middle Level Reading Question of the Day is below.

You can use the SSAT Middle Level Reading Comprehension Question of the Day to get into the habit of thinking about SSAT Middle Level Reading Comprehension content on a daily basis when studying for the SSAT. Varsity Tutors' SSAT Middle Level Reading Comprehension Questions of the Day are drawn from each topic and question type covered on the Middle Level Reading Comprehension section of the SSAT.

Question of the Day: SSAT Middle Level Reading

Adapted from Myths and Legends of All Nations by Logan Marshall (1914)

Many, many centuries ago there lived two brothers, Prometheus or Forethought, and Epimetheus or Afterthought. They were the sons of those Titans who had fought against Jupiter and been sent in chains to the great prison-house of the lower world, but for some reason had escaped punishment.

Prometheus, however, did not care for idle life among the gods on Mount Olympus. Instead he preferred to spend his time on the earth, helping men to find easier and better ways of living. For the children of earth were not happy as they had been in the golden days when Saturn ruled. Indeed, they were very poor and wretched and cold, without fire, without food, and with no shelter but miserable caves. "With fire they could at least warm their bodies and cook their food," Prometheus thought, "and later they could make tools and build houses for themselves and enjoy some of the comforts of the gods."

So Prometheus went to Jupiter and asked that he might be permitted to carry fire to the earth. But Jupiter shook his head in wrath. "Fire, indeed!" he exclaimed. "If men had fire they would soon be as strong and wise as we who dwell on Olympus. Never will I give my consent." Prometheus made no reply, but he didn't give up his idea of helping men. "Some other way must be found," he thought.

Then, one day, as he was walking among some reeds he broke off one, and seeing that its hollow stalk was filled with a dry, soft pith, exclaimed: “At last! In this I can carry fire and the children of men shall have the great gift in spite of Jupiter."

Immediately, taking a long stalk in his hands, he set out for the dwelling of the sun in the far east. He reached there in the early morning, just as Apollo's chariot was about to begin its journey across the sky. Lighting his reed, he hurried back, carefully guarding the precious spark that was hidden in the hollow stalk.

Then he showed men how to build fires for themselves, and it was not long before they began to do all the wonderful things of which Prometheus had dreamed. They learned to cook and to domesticate animals and to till the fields and to mine precious metals and melt them into tools and weapons. And they came out of their dark and gloomy caves and built for themselves beautiful houses of wood and stone. And instead of being sad and unhappy they began to laugh and sing. "Behold, the Age of Gold has come again," they said. But Jupiter was not so happy. He saw that men were gaining daily greater power, and their very prosperity made him angry. "That young Titan!" he cried out, when he heard what Prometheus had done. "I will punish him."

He called Strength and Force and bade them seize the Titan and carry him to the highest peak of the Caucasus Mountains. Then he sent Vulcan to bind him with iron chains, making arms and feet fast to the rocks. Vulcan was sorry for Prometheus, but dared not disobey.

So the friend of man lay, miserably bound, naked to the winds, while the storms beat about him and an eagle tore at his liver with its cruel talons. But Prometheus did not utter a groan in spite of all his sufferings. Year after year he lay in agony, and yet he would not complain, beg for mercy or repent of what he had done. Men were sorry for him, but could do nothing.

Then one day a beautiful white cow passed over the mountain, and stopped to look at Prometheus with sad eyes. “I know you," Prometheus said. "You are Io, once a fair and happy maiden dwelling in Argos, doomed by Jupiter and his jealous queen to wander over the earth in this guise. Go southward and then west until you come to the great river Nile. There you shall again become a maiden, fairer than ever before, and shall marry the king of that country. And from your race shall spring the hero who will break my chains and set me free."

Centuries passed and then a great hero, Hercules, came to the Caucasus Mountains. He climbed the rugged peak, slew the fierce eagle, and with mighty blows broke the chains that bound the friend of man.

What thing or person can you infer that Apollo carries on the back of his chariot?

The sky 

Reeds

The moon 

Jupiter

The sun 

Middle school learners who are interested in attending an independent or private school may need to take the Secondary School Admission Test. These tests are used to evaluate your middle school learner’s knowledge, and usually play a role in helping faculty come to a decision regarding admission. There are three different versions of the Middle Level SSAT, depending on your learner’s grade. Whether your learner is looking to take the fifth, sixth, or seventh grade version of the Middle Level SSAT, Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools have the resources available to help him or her get the most out of their Middle Level SSAT Reading review sessions.


The reading component of the Middle Level SSAT consists of 40 reading comprehension-based questions. By accessing the Question of the Day on the Learning Tools website, your learner will be given a random Middle Level SSAT Reading question each day. These questions are completely random and cover literary form, the humanities, social sciences, and natural science. The Question of the Day provides daily SSAT Middle Level Reading review to assist in preparing your learner for the reading component of the Middle Level SSAT. By answering a random question every day, he or she will be able to test his or her knowledge on a number of areas covered by the SSAT.

At times, standardized tests can seem difficult to prepare for. Sometimes being able to succeed at standardized tests is a skill of its own. However, by continuing to utilize the Question of the Day, you are enabling your learner to build the essential study habits needed to prepare him or her for test day. Moreover, the randomness of each question is a good way to help your middle school learner prepare for the unexpected on the actual test.

In addition to helping your learner review previously learned material, the Question of the Day provides you with a great way to help your middle school learner understand new concepts. Following each Middle Level SSAT Reading question is an in-depth explanation that tells your child how the correct answer was obtained. Not only do these explanations help improve learners’ reading practice by letting learners see their mistakes, but they may also contain important definitions and vocabulary words that may appear on the test.

By using the Question of the Day alongside the rest of Varsity Tutors’ comprehensive Learning Tools, your middle school learner can develop a fully customizable Middle Level SSAT Reading study guide that is suited to his or her needs. In addition to the Question of the Day, your learner can get more in-depth, concept-specific SSAT Middle Level Reading help by using Learn by Concept. Your child can also drill their skills using the multitude of SSAT Middle Level Reading Flashcards and test their knowledge with the Practice Tests.

The Question of the Day is an excellent way to help your child get the valuable daily SSAT Middle Level Reading practice they need. By making use of all of Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools, your learner can build their confidence as they prepare for the Middle Level Reading SSAT.

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