Varsity Tutors always has a different HSPT Reading Question of the Day ready at your disposal! If you’re just looking to get a quick review into your busy day, our HSPT Reading Question of the Day is the perfect option. Answer enough of our HSPT Reading Question of the Day problems and you’ll be ready to ace the next test. Check out what today’s HSPT Reading Question of the Day is below.

One of the tests you may need to take before high school is the High School Placement Test, or HSPT. The test has multiple-choice questions that cover five subjects. The HSPT has reading, math, language, verbal, and quantitative sections. Anyone will tell you that the key to passing a major test is through preparation before you take the test. If you’re looking for free HSPT Reading section test practice, Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools have your back! You can choose from several different free practice options, including the Question of the Day. Every day, you can answer a free random question that pertains to the HSPT Reading section.

The Question of the Day changes on a daily basis. Each question is pulled from a massive collection of free HSPT Reading section practice tests. When you are registered with the website and you answer the question each day, you get a full assessment based on how you did, including any past questions that you may have answered. You are given key information that can provide valuable insight into your learning needs. You can see what concepts you most frequently get incorrect, and where you are at your strongest, allowing you to focus your studies on that particular area through other Learning Tools, such as Learn by Concept, flashcards, or full-length practice tests.

The Question of the Day provides further intelligence into your HSPT Reading section test preparedness, such as what percentile you would be placed by ranking you among anyone else that answered the question, and how long you took to answer the question. The information is further able to be used to help you create a specific study plan based on your individual needs, allowing you to use your study time on materials that you need to study. Through the randomization, you reap the benefits of rotating through different topics, such as ensuring the information is fresh in your mind, and preventing boredom related to sticking to the same topic.

With Varsity Tutors’ Learning Tools, you have the ability to study a wide range of different HSPT Reading section concepts. The Question of the Day covers them all at random, allowing you to have a quick refresher on a daily basis. You’ll be asked questions pertaining to the following HSPT Reading section topics: contemporary life, natural science, humanities, and social science. These may focus on comparison, contrast, main ideas, passage reasoning, authorial purpose, implied characteristics, inferring, predicting, concluding, cause and effect, fact and fiction, and details. In addition, there are questions for defining vocabulary words, finding the meaning among multiple possible meanings, and using context clues to determine word choice.

Before it’s time for you to take the HSPT, take the time to review the Question of the Day and other Learning Tools. They offer a valuable combination of focused study on core concepts, as well as free practice testing to determine how ready you really are. Rather than simply memorizing different ideas and facts, you can use your study time to test yourself on your true knowledge.

Question of the Day: HSPT Reading

"American Students and Foreign Languages" by Matthew Minerd (2013)

American students often find it difficult to understand the need for learning a foreign language. In part, this lack of understanding seems to occur because of the insulated nature of American geography. Unlike Europe, America is a massive country, comprised of states that all speak the same language. When an American travels from state to state, he or she is not confronted with a completely different language group as is the case when, for example, a Frenchman travels from his native land to the neighboring country of Italy or to England. Although America does have Canada to its north and Mexico to its south, it still does not have the great internal variety of languages as one finds in the small European continent. Therefore, students often do not experience the practical importance of knowing other languages.

Of course, America has always been called the “melting pot,” for many peoples have arrived on its shores, bringing their own distinctive cultures and languages with them. Still, this very expression—“melting pot”—shows that these immigrant cultures do not forever retain their own particular manners and languages. With time, these varied cultures become part of the American culture as a whole. While they do influence and change the culture, they likewise become assimilated into it. Their spoken language often becomes English. Even if they retain their mother tongue, they generally speak it privately. This is done as a matter of personal heritage, not as part of the day-to-day life in the culture. 

Additionally, America’s global dominance likewise allows Americans to avoid learning other languages. Since America has such influence over the rest of the world, it is generally in the interests of other peoples to learn English in order to be part of the economic, political, and military world in which America operates. Therefore, even at international meetings that are filled with people from many nationalities and language groups, English-speakers are at an advantage because they can talk with the many individuals who speak English. The work and learning of other peoples thus allows the Americans to convince themselves that there is no need to learn another language. 

Lastly, American education has come to emphasize mathematics and science to such a great degree that things such as language can often seem unimportant. The main goals of education are said to be the training of students for the technology workforce. If this is presented as the main goal of school, few children will understand why any of the non-scientific subjects are included in the curriculum. If a subject does not help in learning math and science, it will appear to be irrelevant. In particular, foreign languages do not seem to add to the teaching of math and science, which can be done very easily and effectively in English alone. 

Of course, many other reasons could be considered, and a more detailed discussion would undertake such a lengthy investigation. Still, the factors discussed above do provide some sense as to why American students find it difficult to understand the importance of learning a foreign language.

What is the main intent of this passage?

To critique the American education system, particularly in its ignorance regarding foreign languages

To discuss the reasons that American students find it difficult to understand the need for learning a foreign language

To show the many ways that Americans are deficient in languages in comparison with other countries

To present statistics concerning the deficiencies of American education with regard to languages

To discuss the imperialism of American aspirations and insistence on the use of English

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