Algebra II : Sigma Notation

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Algebra II

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Example Questions

Example Question #43 : Summations And Sequences

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Correct answer:

Explanation:

This notation is asking us to add for all integer values of k between 1 and 4: 

 

Example Question #21 : Sigma Notation

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Explanation:

This expression is asking us to add the expressions for every integer value of n from 0 to 4:

Example Question #22 : Sigma Notation

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Explanation:

means that we are adding half of 20, plus half of that, plus half of that.

1:

2:

3:

Example Question #46 : Summations And Sequences

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Explanation:

This is asking us to add for n = 3 and 4.

Example Question #47 : Summations And Sequences

Calculate

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Explanation:

This is asking us to plug in the integers between 0 and 5, then add these numbers together.

Example Question #48 : Summations And Sequences

Evaluate

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Explanation:

This is asking us to add 6 plus two thirds of 6, plus two thirds of that, etc.

Example Question #49 : Summations And Sequences

Evaluate

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Explanation:

This is asking us to substitute integer values between 4 and 8 for n, and then add the results.

Example Question #50 : Summations And Sequences

Evaluate

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Explanation:

First, evaluate the sigma expression. It is asking us to plug in for k all of the integers between 0 and 4:

Now, multiply by

Example Question #51 : Summations And Sequences

Solve:  

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Correct answer:

Explanation:

Substitute the terms  for each iteration of the summation.

Add the fractions.

Convert the fractions to a common denominator. 

The answer is:  

Example Question #52 : Summations And Sequences

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Correct answer:

Explanation:

When using summation notation, the number on the bottom is the starting input value, and the number on the top is the ending input value.

 

This means that you will be adding the result of the first 5 outputs after plugging in 1 through 5. 

Plug in each value of n, from 1 to 5.

Now we take all of these numbers and sum them to get: 

 so.....

 

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