High School Math : Geometry

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for High School Math

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : How To Find The Length Of An Arc

Figure not drawn to scale.

In the figure above, circle C has a radius of 18, and the measure of angle ACB is equal to 100°. What is the perimeter of the red shaded region?

Possible Answers:

36 + 20π

18 + 36π

36 + 10π

18 + 10π

36 + 36π

Correct answer:

36 + 10π

Explanation:

The perimeter of any region is the total distance around its boundaries. The perimeter of the shaded region consists of the two straight line segments, AC and BC, as well as the arc AB. In order to find the perimeter of the whole region, we must add the lengths of AC, BC, and the arc AB.

The lengths of AC and BC are both going to be equal to the length of the radius, which is 18. Thus, the perimeter of AC and BC together is 36.

Lastly, we must find the length of arc AB and add it to 36 to get the whole perimeter of the region.

Angle ACB is a central angle, and it intercepts arc AB. The length of AB is going to equal a certain portion of the circumference. This portion will be equal to the ratio of the measure of angle ACB to the measure of the total degrees in the circle. There are 360 degrees in any circle. The ratio of the angle ACB to 360 degrees will be 100/360 = 5/18. Thus, the length of the arc AB will be 5/18 of the circumference of the circle, which equals 2πr, according to the formula for circumference.

length of arc AB = (5/18)(2πr) = (5/18)(2π(18)) = 10π.

Thus, the length of arc AB is 10π.

The total length of the perimeter is thus 36 + 10π.

The answer is 36 + 10π.

Example Question #41 : Geometry

Find the arc length of a sector that has an angle of 120 degrees and radius of 3.

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

The equation for the arc length of a sector is .

Substitute the given radius for  and the given angle for  to get the following equation:

Simplify:

Example Question #42 : Geometry

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

 

Example Question #21 : Sectors

Find the circumference of the following sector:

6

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

The formula for the circumference of a sector is

,

where  is the radius of the sector and  is the fraction of the sector.

Plugging in our values, we get:

Example Question #1 : How To Find The Length Of An Arc

Circle

In the circle above, the angle A in radians is 

What is the length of arc A?

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

Circumference of a Circle = 

Arc Length

Example Question #41 : Plane Geometry

Solve for .

Question_10

(Figure not drawn to scale).

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

We can solve for the angle, , by using the below relationship.

In the figure, intercepted arc is given.

 

Example Question #1 : How To Find The Angle Of A Sector

A pie has a diameter of 12". A piece is cut out, having a surface area of 4.5π. What is the angle of the cut?

Possible Answers:

25°

4.5°

12.5°

45°

90°

Correct answer:

45°

Explanation:

This is simply a matter of percentages. We first have to figure out what percentage of the surface area is represented by 4.5π. To do that, we must calculate the total surface area. If the diameter is 12, the radius is 6. Don't be tricked by this!

A = π * 6 * 6 = 36π

Now, 4.5π is 4.5π/36π percentage or 0.125 (= 12.5%)

To figure out the angle, we must take that percentage of 360°:

0.125 * 360 = 45°

Example Question #1 : How To Find The Angle Of A Sector

Eric is riding a Ferris wheel. The Ferris wheel has 18 compartments, numbered in order clockwise. If compartment 1 is at 0 degrees and Eric enters compartment 13, what angle is he at?

Possible Answers:

240

300

260

280

180

Correct answer:

240

Explanation:

12 compartments further means 240 more degrees. 240 is the answer.

360/12 = 240 degrees

Example Question #23 : Sectors

Solve for .

Question_10

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

The measure of an arc of an inscribed angle is twice the size of the inscribed angle.

Example Question #1 : How To Find The Angle Of A Sector

 

 

Circle2

 

 

In the figure above that includes Circle O, the measure of angle BAC is equal to 35 degrees, the measure of angle FBD is equal to 40 degrees, and the measure of arc AD is twice the measure of arc AB. Which of the following is the measure of angle CEF? The figure is not necessarily drawn to scale, and the red numbers are used to mark the angles, not represent angle measures.

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

The measure of angle CEF is going to be equal to half of the difference between the measures two arcs that it intercepts, namely arcs AD and CD.

Thus, we need to find the measure of arcs AD and CD. Let's look at the information given and determine how it can help us figure out the measures of arcs AD and CD. 

Angle BAC is an inscribed angle, which means that its meausre is one-half of the measure of the arc that it incercepts, which is arc BC.

Thus, since angle BAC is 35 degrees, the measure of arc BC must be 70 degrees.

We can use a similar strategy to find the measure of arc CD, which is the arc intercepted by the inscribed angle FBD.

Because angle FBD has a measure of 40 degrees, the measure of arc CD must be 80 degrees.

We have the measures of arcs BC and CD. But we still need the measure of arc AD. We can use the last piece of information given, along with our knowledge about the sum of the arcs of a circle, to determine the measure of arc AD.

We are told that the measure of arc AD is twice the measure of arc AB. We also know that the sum of the measures of arcs AD, AB, CD, and BC must be 360 degrees, because there are 360 degrees in a full circle. 

Because AD = 2AB, we can substitute 2AB for AD.

This means the measure of arc AB is 70 degrees, and the measure of arc AD is 2(70) = 140 degrees.

Now, we have all the information we need to find the measure of angle CEF, which is equal to half the difference between the measure of arcs AD and CD.

 

 

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