GRE Verbal : Nouns and Verbs in Two-Blank Texts

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for GRE Verbal

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Example Questions

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Example Question #1371 : Text Completion

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

Surely the year that ___________________ artificial intelligence will go down in the ____________________ of history.

Possible Answers:

espies . . . archives

actualizes . . . fabrications

engenders . . . annals

spawns . . . canards

lambastes . . . chronicles

Correct answer:

engenders . . . annals

Explanation:

“Engender,” which originally meant for life forms to procreate, now carries the meaning of producing or causing to happen. “Annals” comes from a Latin word that means year. “Annals” can refer to year-by-year chronological records, or it can refer to general recorded history, such as the phrase “annals of history.” “Engenders . . . annals” is the best answer.

Example Question #71 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

They ___________________ over whether to add a(n) ____________________ to their report after new information came forward.

Possible Answers:

pettifogged . . . farrago

cosseted . . . addendum

quibbled . . . annex

pampered . . . supplement

squabbled . . . goulash

Correct answer:

quibbled . . . annex

Explanation:

To “cosset” means to pamperto treat with extreme kindness and attention. Neither of these verbs fit the sentence. A “goulash” is a type of stew, or it can also refer to a mixture of different things, similar to “farrago.” To “quibble” is a small argument about a trivial matter. “Annex” refers to an addition made to something else. “Quibbled . . . annex” is the best answer.

Example Question #122 : Parts Of Speech In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

____________________ was not enough; she wanted to _______________________ her business rivals by any means necessary.

Possible Answers:

Approbation . . . decimate

Calumny . . . advocate

Slander . . . condone

Defamation . . . annihilate

Plaudits . . . abrogate

Correct answer:

Defamation . . . annihilate

Explanation:

“Plaudits” and “approbation” could theoretically work, if the words that followed them carried a positive connotation that went one step further. This is not the case. “Defamation” refers to hurting reputations. “Annihilate” goes one step further than defeating or killing; it means to wipe away all trace of something, even to go as far as to erase its memory. “Defamation . . . annihilate” is the best response.

Example Question #123 : Parts Of Speech In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

Since his grandmother had always ______________________ him, it took him by surprise to find that she had left him a(n) _____________________ of ten thousand dollars in her will.

Possible Answers:

abhorred . . . annuity

idolized . . . inheritance

lauded . . . allowance

anathematized . . . vanguard

execrated . . . apogee

Correct answer:

abhorred . . . annuity

Explanation:

If his grandmother had “idolized” or “lauded” him, it wouldn’t come as a surprise to find that she had left him money. To “abhor” is to regard with complete hatred. “Annuity” refers to money that is paid out regularly to someone for a set amount of time. “Abhorred . . . annuity” is the correct answer.

Example Question #124 : Parts Of Speech In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

The complete ________________ of the nation's government ____________________ from the total lack of support of its citizens, as well as from its inability to pay off debts owed to foreign powers.

Possible Answers:

collapse . . . ingratiated 

implosion . . . insinuated

dissolution . . . stemmed

proxy . . . adulterated

idolatry . . . originated

Correct answer:

dissolution . . . stemmed

Explanation:

It's clear from the context of the sentence that the first blank must refer to the negative consequence of the government's ineptitude. "Collapse," "implosion," and "dissolution" are all possibly correct, so we will need to take a look at the second blank in order to narrow down our options. From the context given, we can see that the second blank is used to explain the cause of the government's failure. Of our remaining choices, only "stemmed" fits. Thus, we know that "dissolution" and "stemmed" are our answers.

Example Question #125 : Parts Of Speech In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

While camping in Yosemite, mosquitoes were the _________________  of my existence, ________________ countless red, itchy bumps all over my arms and legs.

Possible Answers:

banal . . . kindling

augury . . . generating

frustration . . . jettisoning

bane . . . spawning

dirge . . . weltering

Correct answer:

bane . . . spawning

Explanation:

This question becomes easily answered if you're able to recognize the expression "bane of my existence," a common phrase which refers to something that spoils or ruins. Even if this did not immediately come to mind, a closer inspection of the answer choices presents few other viable options in the first blank. In the second blank, only "spawning" and "generating" make any sense. As an "augury" is a sign of something that will happen in the future, only the combination of "bane" and "spawning" makes sense in the context of the sentence.

Example Question #126 : Parts Of Speech In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

The tour boat's __________________ was thrown entirely off course when a crew member mistakenly ____________________ the boat's engine when instructed to lighten the load on board.

Possible Answers:

fluke . . . engendered

fuselage . . . posited

schedule . . . inveigled

itinerary . . . jettisoned

hegemony . . . discarded

Correct answer:

itinerary . . . jettisoned

Explanation:

An "schedule" is a timetable for things to take place and the word seemingly fits in the first blank of the sentence; however, to "inveigle" is to entice or lure through flattery, which does not make sense in the second blank. "Itinerary" is a word close in meaning to schedule, and "jettison" literally means to cast overboard. Therefore, "itinerary" and "jettison" are our best choices.

Example Question #127 : Parts Of Speech In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

Even decades after the scandal, opponents ____________________ the politician about the past indiscretions which marked a _____________________ in his public life and nearly ended his career altogether.

Possible Answers:

nettled . . . nadir

confounded . . . transgression

pestered . . . acme

brooked . . . puissance

harassed . . . anodyne

Correct answer:

nettled . . . nadir

Explanation:

In this sentence, it saves time to intuitively recognize that the second blank is more limited in the words which might logically fit. In examining the answer choices, only "nadir" and "transgression" make sense, so we've immediately narrowed our options down to two. Now, let's look at the first blank. Since we are now choosing between "nettled" and "confounded," it is clear that only "nettled" makes sense in the context. Therefore, we have arrived at our correct pairing of "nettled" and "nadir."

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