GRE Verbal : Nouns and Verbs in Two-Blank Texts

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for GRE Verbal

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Example Questions

Example Question #51 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

The eruption of the ancient _________________, standing above the cloud and spewing a large amount of fire, ________________ the town underneath; luckily, everyone escaped.

Possible Answers:

customers . . . restrained

volcano . . . incinerated

reporters . . . enlightened

police . . . maligned

dogs . . . understood

Correct answer:

volcano . . . incinerated

Explanation:

"Volcano" is the only word that makes sense in context, as the following clause discusses the raining down of fire, which is a thing that pretty much only volcanoes, of the objects given in the answers, do. No other nouns fit there. "Incinerated" fits as the following word, as the previous clause discusses the raining of fire, and the following clause discusses the fortune that everyone escaped.

Example Question #52 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

The politician was convinced of his ______________ because of the screaming fans outside of his door, so he made the controversial decision to ______________ preparing for the debate to get more sleep.

Possible Answers:

love . . . strengthen

strength . . . begin

popularity . . . neglect

pleasure . . . enliven

weakness . . . appreciate

Correct answer:

popularity . . . neglect

Explanation:

"Popularity" makes sense given the description of the fans outside of the door. "Neglect" also works because it describes his stopping an action to get ready for sleep. This question was asking you to find an appropriate abstract noun, and a verb action based on the missing dynamic created by that abstract concept.

Example Question #53 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

The dictator displayed a _____________ for theft, using his power to _____________ for himself any property that he fancied.

Possible Answers:

alchemy . . . pervade

vexation . . . rarefy

proclivity . . . tout

propensity . . . appropriate

derision . . . obfuscate

Correct answer:

propensity . . . appropriate

Explanation:

"Proclivity" means natural predisposition. "Appropriate," as a verb, means to confiscate or take for one's own use. "Proclivity" has a similar meaning to "propensity," but "tout" means to publicly praise and therefore doesn't fit in the second blank.

Example Question #54 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

After they heard of the _______________, neighbors came to _______________ with them during the trying time. 

Possible Answers:

alleviation . . . sympathize

infirmity . . . upbraid

affliction . . . commiserate

respite . . . condole

malady . . . condone

Correct answer:

affliction . . . commiserate

Explanation:

“Respite” means to take a break from something unpleasant, so this word would not be appropriate given that its accompanying word is “condole.” “Condone” could possibly work for the second blank; however, given that it would either mean to pardon or to disregard something objectionable, it is a weak choice at best. An “affliction” is a state of pain or distress. To “commiserate” means to express sympathy for someone. “Affliction . . . commiserate” is the correct answer.

Example Question #55 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

We stood agape before a valley and the _______________ of sunlight _________________ hundreds of acres of verdant grass.

Possible Answers:

splendor . . . attenuating

jejuneness . . . saturating

aridity . . . suffusing

effulgence . . . permeating

sublimity . . . apprising

Correct answer:

effulgence . . . permeating

Explanation:

“Jejuneness” refers to something being dull or immature. “Aridity” means either dull or uninteresting. Neither of these words fit the sentence well. “Effulgence” refers to being dazzled by light. “Permeate” is to pass through every part of something. “Effulgence . . . permeating” is the best answer.

Example Question #56 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

He _______________ a portion of his earnings for the ________________ of a luxury sports car.

Possible Answers:

aggregated . . . relinquishment

allocated . . . acquisition

garnered . . . abnegation

explicated . . . accretion

deranged . . . procurement

Correct answer:

allocated . . . acquisition

Explanation:

“Abnegation” is to deny oneself of something. It wouldn’t make sense for him to save up or collect his money in order to deny himself a car, so this choice can be eliminated. Similarly, “relinquishment” will also not work. To “allocate” is to set aside for a particular purpose. “Acquisition” refers to coming into possession of something. “Allocated . . . acquisition” is the correct answer.

Example Question #57 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

She was ________________ to discover that her recounting of her nightly _________________ was overheard by a policeman.

Possible Answers:

rattled . . . slogging

placated . . . roguery

disconcerted . . . travails

conciliated . . . antics

abashed . . . escapades

Correct answer:

abashed . . . escapades

Explanation:

“Slogging” refers to long and tiring work. The key to the second blank is to note that her emotional response was the result of being “overheard by a policeman.” “Travails” has a similar definition to “slogging.” To be “abashed” means that you feel embarrassed. An “escapade” is a reckless, dangerous adventure that probably involves some type of “escape.” “Abashed . . . escapades" is the best answer.

Example Question #58 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that best completes the following sentence.

Todd was almost an utter _______________ of Gregory. He did not merely _______________ Gregory’s mannerisms but, in fact, was like him in almost every way imaginable.

Possible Answers:

adherent . . . contemplate

doppelganger . . . imitate

parallel . . . mediate

similitude . . . document

devotee . . . reflect on

Correct answer:

doppelganger . . . imitate

Explanation:

Apparently Todd was almost an exact copy of Gregory. The word doppelganger comes from the German word meaning "double-goer." It is based on the mythological idea of one person who looks totally like another person. This "copy" is a double of the other person. Apparently Todd was like this with regard to Gregory—or at least almost so. (Notice that it does say that he was almost an utter doppelganger.)

This means that Todd didn't merely copy this or that element of Gregory's mannerisms. To say this another way, he did not merely "imitate" Gregory.

Example Question #59 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the set of words that best completes the following sentence.

The __________ of the art museum was __________ by the presence of a couple of neanderthals. 

Possible Answers:

tranquility . . . atoned

ambience . . . adulterated

aura . . . exonerated

bedlam . . . attenuated

anarchy . . . defiled

Correct answer:

ambience . . . adulterated

Explanation:

When you call someone a “neanderthal,” you are referring to a group of humans who lived thousands of years ago. You essentially mean that the person is as stupid and ill-mannered as a caveman. “Ambience” refers to the atmosphere or mood of a place. To “adulterate” means to corrupt or mess something up. “Ambience . . . adulterated” is the most logical choice.

Example Question #60 : Nouns And Verbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the set of words that best completes the following sentence.

She was a(n) __________ when it came to pranks. At least once a week, she would __________ him with water balloons from a rooftop.

Possible Answers:

moderate . . . assault

maniac . . . bulwark

fanatic . . . ambush

addict . . . garrison

conservative . . . bombard

Correct answer:

fanatic . . . ambush

Explanation:

In case you were wondering, to “bulwark” is to defend against something with a protective wall. When someone is a “fanatic,” they are really excited about something, so much in fact that they might come off as a little crazy. To “ambush” is to suddenly come out from your hiding place and attack someone. “Fanatic . . . ambush” is the correct answer.

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