AP US History : 1755–1800

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP US History

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Example Questions

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Example Question #2 : Domestic Politics 1755–1800

A. I think the difference is very great. An external tax is a duty laid on commodities imported; that duty is added to the first cost, and other charges on the commodity, and when it is offered to sale, makes a part of the price. If the people do not like it at that price, they refuse it; they are not obliged to pay it. But an internal tax is forced from the people without their consent, if not laid by their own representatives. The Stamp Act says we shall have no commerce, make no exchange of property with each other, neither purchase nor grant, nor recover debts; we shall neither marry, nor make our wills, unless we pay such and such sums, and thus it is intended to extort our money from us, or ruin us by the consequences of refusing to pay it.

Q. But supposing the external tax or duty to be laid on the necessaries of life imported into your Colony, will not that be the same thing in its effects as an internal tax?

A. I do not know a single article imported into the Northern Colonies but what they can either do without or make themselves.

Q. Don’t you think cloth from England absolutely necessary to them?

A. No, by no means absolutely necessary; with industry and good management, they may very well supply themselves with all they want.

Q. Considering the resolutions of Parliament, as to the right, do you think if the Stamp Act is repealed that the North Americans will be satisfied?

A. I believe they will.

-Excerpt from Benjamin Franklin Testimony before the House of Commons relating to the Stamp Act, 13 Feb. 1766.

Britain responded to the Stamp Act crisis by _________________.

Possible Answers:

sending more troops to America

repealing the law

stopping the colonial exports

closing the Boston port

Correct answer:

repealing the law

Explanation:

England was disturbed by the strong reaction by the colonists. English merchants suffered from colonial boycotts. Parliament repealed the Stamp Act but passed the Declaration Act, reaffirming British authority over the colonies in all cases.

Example Question #21 : 1755–1800

Yet sorrowful it is, that many there are in Membership with us, who, notwithstanding the Labour bestow'd still continue to hold these People as Slaves under the Consideration whereof we are deeply affected, and United in Judgement, that we are loudly called upon to a faithful Obedience to the Injunction of our blessed Lord "to do all Men as we would they should do unto us" and to bear a clear testimony to these truths that "God is no respecter of Persons" and that "Christ died for all Men without distinction," which we earnestly and affectionately entreat may be duly consider'd in the awful and alarming Dispensation, and excite to impartial justice and judgment to black and white, rich and poor.

Passage adapted from "Society of Friends: Extracts from the Minutes of the Yearly Meeting," (September 23-28, 1776)

Which of the provided labels likely describes the author of this passage?

Possible Answers:

secessionist

abolitionist

eugenicist

industrialist

Correct answer:

abolitionist

Explanation:

Abolitionists believed that the slave trade should end and the slaves should be set free. Slavery posed special problems for Quakers, one of whom wrote this passage, because they strove to lead sinless lives. For Quakers, as for many later abolitionists, slavery could never be reconciled with the Golden Rule or with the other bedrock Judeo-Christian precept that God "is no respecter of Persons" — or in other words, that worldly titles, status, and privilege do not matter in the ultimate scheme of things.

 

Example Question #12 : Domestic Politics 1755–1800

"The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people." 

-- 9th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

What political group would be most in favor of this amendment?

Possible Answers:

Democratic-Republicans

Federalists

Democrats

Anti-federalists

Correct answer:

Anti-federalists

Explanation:

The Ninth Amendment to the Constitution provided that other rights existed beyond those that are listed. The amendment, drafted by James Madison, provided an additional protection against potentially tyrannical government. At the time of the adoption of the Constitution, this was a chief concern of those identified as Anti-federalists.

Example Question #11 : Domestic Politics 1755–1800

That this kingdom has the sovereign, the supreme legislative power over America, is granted. It cannot be denied; and taxation is a part of that sovereign power. It is one branch of the legislation. . . . Protection and obedience are reciprocal. Great Britain protects America, America is bound to yield [give] obedience. If not, tell me when the Americans were emancipated? When they want the protection of this kingdom, they are always ready to ask it. That protection has always been afforded them in the most full and ample manner. The nation has run itself into an immense debt to give them this protection; and now they are called upon to contribute a small share to the public expense.

-George Grenville, Member of Parliament (January 14, 1766)

After the French and Indian War, what point was parliament making?

Possible Answers:

enforce laws in the Americas because they owe sovereignty to Britain

became lax on the reign in the colonies

enforce laws in newly conquered French territory

begin a policy of salutary neglect in the America

Correct answer:

enforce laws in the Americas because they owe sovereignty to Britain

Explanation:

The British empire in North America had grown to huge and England had to pay attention to protecting and defending it, not neglecting it. To the British, it seemed natural to ask the colonist to help pay for the war and share the cost of maintaining troops. The British government decided to enforce existing trade laws and to introduce new laws. This new involvement was unwelcome as the colonists were used to salutary neglect, having habits of self rule.

Example Question #21 : 1755–1800

AN ACT for granting and applying certain stamp duties, and other duties, in the British colonies and plantations in America, towards further defraying the expenses of defending, protecting, and securing the same…

WHEREAS, by an act made in the last session of Parliament several duties were granted, continued, and appropriated toward defraying the expenses of defending, protecting, and securing the British colonies and plantations in America; and whereas it is just and necessary that provision be made for raising a further revenue within your majesty's dominions in America toward defraying the said expenses; we, your majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, have therefore resolved to give and grant unto your majesty the several rates and duties hereinafter mentioned… there shall be raised, levied, collected, and paid unto his majesty, his heirs, and successors, throughout the colonies and plantations in America…

-Excerpt from Stamp Act. March 22, 1765

The Stamp Act aroused opposition because it __________.

Possible Answers:

was passed by the colonial assemblies

taxed paper articles that most colonists used

slowed down mail deliveries

provided the that British soldiers were to be quartered in American towns in peacetime

Correct answer:

taxed paper articles that most colonists used

Explanation:

The Stamp Act of 1765 stirred up a storm of protest as it taxed newspapers, almanacs, pamphlets, playing cards, and legal documents. A government tax had to be placed on each article to show that the tax had been paid. Colonists showed their distaste  through secret societies, boycotting the items, and even attacking tax collectors.

Example Question #15 : Domestic Politics 1755–1800

About ten o'clock the enemy began to advance briskly in three columns, with loud shouts and recovered arms, two of them inclining to the left of our army, and the third towards our right, firing obliquely at the two extremities of our line, from the distance of one hundred and thirty, until they came within forty, yards; which our troops withstood with the greatest intrepidity and firmness, still reserving their fire, and paying the strictest obedience to their officers. This uncommon steadiness, together with the havoc which the grapeshot from our fieldpieces made among them, threw them into some disorder, and was most critically maintained by a well-timed, regular, and heavy discharge of our small arms, such as they could no longer oppose. Hereupon they gave way, and fled with precipitation, so that, by the time the cloud of smoke was vanished, our men were again loaded, and, profiting by the advantage we had over them, pursued them almost to the gates of the town and the bridge over the little river, redoubling our fire with great eagerness, making many officers and men prisoners.

- The Journal of John Knox, British Army Officer. 1763

What turning point battle of the French and Indian War is this passage about?

Possible Answers:

the Fall of Montreal

the French capture at Fort Oswego

the British seizure of Fort Niagara

the Capture of Quebec

Correct answer:

the Capture of Quebec

Explanation:

In 1759, under the leadership of James Wolfe, the British sailed up the St. Lawrence River. The troops were over 9,000 and they battled to break the defenses  for four months. Finally, the troops landed in the foot of the cliffs near the city. The forces confronted each other the next morning in the Plains of Abraham, a field outside the city. Both Wolfe and the Marquis de Montecalm, the french commander, were killed in this battle. As the British defeated the French and Captured the city of Quebec, making this the pivotal point in the French and Indian War.

Example Question #11 : Domestic Politics 1755–1800

"Political liberty, the great Montesquieu again observes, consists in security, or at least in the opinion we have of security; and this security therefore, or the opinion, is best obtained in moderate governments, where the mildness of the laws, and the equality of the manners, beget a confidence in the people, which produces this security, or the opinion. This moderation in governments, depends in a great measure on their limits, connected with their political distribution."

The author of this selection is most likely taking a position on __________.

Possible Answers:

the Treaty of Paris

the ratification of the Constitution

the Louisiana Purchase

the signing of the Declaration of Independence

Correct answer:

the ratification of the Constitution

Explanation:

The author is an Anti-federalist arguing against ratification of the Constitution. The selection is from Cato and was written in 1787. The selection discusses moderate government and the limits placed on it. This is in line with the views of those who opposed the ratification of the Constitution.

Example Question #22 : 1755–1800

“History and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican government.... Excessive partiality for one foreign nation and excessive dislike of another cause those whom they actuate to see danger only on one side and serve to veil and even second the arts of influence on the other. . . . The great rule of conduct for us, in regard to foreign nations, is in extending our commercial relations to have with them as little political connection as possible. So far as we have already formed engagements, let them be fulfilled with perfect good faith. Here let us stop. Europe has a set of primary interests which to us have none, or a very remote relation. Hence she must be engaged in frequent controversies, the causes of which are essentially foreign to our concerns.”

- George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796

 

The concerns elaborated by Washington were in response to which of the following events?

Possible Answers:

Arguments over purchasing Florida from Spain

Controversy regarding support for the revolutionary government of France

Dispute over the possibility of annexing Canada from Great Britain

Conflict with Great Britain over the treatment of American Loyalists

Debate over the proper treatment of American Indian tribes in the trans-Appalachian West in response to settlement by colonists

Correct answer:

Controversy regarding support for the revolutionary government of France

Explanation:

In his farewell address, Washington warned the nation to avoid permanent alliances with foreign nations. Washington’s efforts to protect the fragile young republic by steering a neutral course between England and France during the French Revolutionary Wars was made extremely difficult by the intense rhetoric flowing from the pro-English Federalists led by Alexander Hamilton and the pro-French led by Thomas Jefferson.

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